Skip to content
Permalink
Branch: master
Find file Copy path
Find file Copy path
Fetching contributors…
Cannot retrieve contributors at this time
64 lines (46 sloc) 2.84 KB

Response

Introduction

In MVC architecture, when controller is finished with its work, you have to return Response. Framework will accept anything, from primitive values to printable object instances, but we recommend that you return any object instance which extends \Koldy\Response\AbstractResponse. Framework comes with few predefined Response classes and all classes are within \Koldy\Response namespace.

Framework Response Classes

  1. View - This is Koldy's templating engine. Use this when you need to print HTML or anything else.
  2. Plain - Use it for plain text. Good for robots.txt.
  3. Redirect - Use this when you want to return 301 or 302 response.
  4. Json - Use this one when you want to return JSON response. Good for APIs.
  5. FileDownload - Good when you want to start file download on client's browser.

Custom Response Classes

To create custom response class yourself, simply extend any of the framework's existing response classes or extend \Koldy\Response\AbstractResponse.

Benefits Of AbstractResponse

When you're using AbstractResponse, you'll notice that these classes automatically have methods for headers, status code and before/after work manipulation. Headers and status codes are standard things when working with HTTP requests, while before and after is function (or more than one function) that will be executed before/after response was dumped to output buffer.

before

Pass any number of functions to before() and all functions will be executed right before everything is sent to output buffer. Functions will be executed in the same order as it was added to queue. This can be good chance to cleanup unnecessary stuff or prepare output. Instance of the same AbstractResponse class is passed as first parameter to the function you passed to before().

return View::create('something')
	->before(function (View $view) {
		Log::debug('Do something with View');
		$view->set('something', 'additional');
	});

after

Pass any number of functions to after() and all functions will be executed right after everything is sent to output buffer. Functions will be executed in the same order as it was added to queue. This can be good chance to cleanup unnecessary stuff or to perform any time-consuming task that doesn't require client to know about, like, sending an email in the background, or sending message to Slack.

When after functions are defined, framework will prepare Content-Length header so the client will close the connection after it receives given number of bytes. That's why you're able to perform any time-consuming task after.

return Json::create()
	->set('success', true)
	->after(function () {
		\YourApp\Slack::notification('Someone signed up!');
	});
You can’t perform that action at this time.