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Adding new gems, filters, and styles.

Signed-off-by: Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene <kurtisrainboltgreene@gmail.com>
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4 Gemfile
@@ -4,8 +4,8 @@ gem 'nanoc', '~> 3.1.7'
gem 'haml', '~> 3.1.1'
gem 'sass', '~> 3.1.1'
-gem 'rdiscount', '~> 1.6.8'
-gem 'highlight', '~> 1.1.2', :require => 'simplabs/highlight'
+gem 'redcarpet', '~> 1.15.2'
+gem 'coderay', '~> 0.9.8'
gem 'heroku', '~> 2.1.4'
View
102 Gemfile.lock
@@ -1,102 +0,0 @@
-GEM
- remote: http://rubygems.org/
- specs:
- activesupport (3.0.7)
- archive-tar-minitar (0.5.2)
- capybara (0.4.1.2)
- celerity (>= 0.7.9)
- culerity (>= 0.2.4)
- mime-types (>= 1.16)
- nokogiri (>= 1.3.3)
- rack (>= 1.0.0)
- rack-test (>= 0.5.4)
- selenium-webdriver (>= 0.0.27)
- xpath (~> 0.1.3)
- celerity (0.8.9)
- childprocess (0.1.9)
- ffi (~> 1.0.6)
- chronic (0.4.0)
- columnize (0.3.2)
- configuration (1.2.0)
- cri (1.0.1)
- culerity (0.2.15)
- delorean (1.0.1)
- chronic
- diff-lcs (1.1.2)
- ffi (1.0.9)
- haml (3.1.1)
- heroku (2.1.4)
- launchy (>= 0.3.2)
- rest-client (~> 1.6.1)
- term-ansicolor (~> 1.0.5)
- highlight (1.1.2)
- activesupport (>= 2.0.0)
- json_pure (1.5.1)
- launchy (0.4.0)
- configuration (>= 0.0.5)
- rake (>= 0.8.1)
- linecache19 (0.5.12)
- ruby_core_source (>= 0.1.4)
- mime-types (1.16)
- msgpack (0.4.5)
- nanoc (3.1.7)
- nanoc3 (>= 3.1.7)
- nanoc3 (3.1.7)
- cri (>= 1.0.0)
- nokogiri (1.4.4)
- rack (1.3.0)
- rack-test (0.6.0)
- rack (>= 1.0)
- rake (0.9.1)
- rbtrace (0.3.13)
- ffi (>= 1.0.6)
- msgpack (>= 0.4.3)
- trollop (>= 1.16.2)
- rdiscount (1.6.8)
- rest-client (1.6.3)
- mime-types (>= 1.16)
- rspec (2.6.0)
- rspec-core (~> 2.6.0)
- rspec-expectations (~> 2.6.0)
- rspec-mocks (~> 2.6.0)
- rspec-core (2.6.3)
- rspec-expectations (2.6.0)
- diff-lcs (~> 1.1.2)
- rspec-mocks (2.6.0)
- ruby-debug-base19 (0.11.25)
- columnize (>= 0.3.1)
- linecache19 (>= 0.5.11)
- ruby_core_source (>= 0.1.4)
- ruby-debug19 (0.11.6)
- columnize (>= 0.3.1)
- linecache19 (>= 0.5.11)
- ruby-debug-base19 (>= 0.11.19)
- ruby_core_source (0.1.5)
- archive-tar-minitar (>= 0.5.2)
- rubyzip (0.9.4)
- sass (3.1.2)
- selenium-webdriver (0.2.1)
- childprocess (>= 0.1.7)
- ffi (>= 1.0.7)
- json_pure
- rubyzip
- term-ansicolor (1.0.5)
- trollop (1.16.2)
- xpath (0.1.4)
- nokogiri (~> 1.3)
-
-PLATFORMS
- ruby
-
-DEPENDENCIES
- capybara (~> 0.4.1.2)
- delorean (~> 1.0.0)
- haml (~> 3.1.1)
- heroku (~> 2.1.4)
- highlight (~> 1.1.2)
- nanoc (~> 3.1.7)
- rbtrace (~> 0.3.13)
- rdiscount (~> 1.6.8)
- rspec (~> 2.6.0)
- ruby-debug19 (~> 0.11.6)
- sass (~> 3.1.1)
View
2 Rules
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ compile '/style/*' do
end
compile '*' do
- filter :rdiscount, { :autolink => true, :smart => true }
+ filter :redcarpet
filter :colorize_syntax
layout 'default'
end
View
33 content/book/chapter/1.markdown
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ And Then There Was Ruby
**Note: If you want to get straight to hacking start at [Chapter 2: Ready! Set! Hack](/chapter/2).**
-[HCP: Hackers, Code, and Programming](id:section-one)
+HCP: Hackers, Code, and Programming
-----------------------------------------------------
> The computer programmer is a creator of universes for which he alone is responsible.
@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@ A computer only knows how and when to do things if you tell it to in it's own la
### Binary's Count 1 To 10, Print Sum
-
+~~~ { language-binary }
00110001 00000000 00000000
00110001 00000001 00000001
00110011 00000001 00000010
@@ -51,6 +51,7 @@ A computer only knows how and when to do things if you tell it to in it's own la
01000001 00000001 00000001
00010000 00000010 00000000
01100010 00000000 00000000
+~~~
This program tells the computer to take every number from 1 to 10, add them together, and display the sum (55).
It's complex, arcane, and completely unreadable to the naked eye for most people.
@@ -60,11 +61,21 @@ The same code is written here in Ruby:
### Ruby's Count 1 To 10, Print Sum
-<script src="http://gist.github.com/654757.js?file=count-to-ten.rb"></script>
+``` ruby
+ total = 0
+ count = 1
+
+ while count <= 10
+ total += count
+ count += 1
+ end
+```
Or even:
-<script src="http://gist.github.com/654757.js?file=alt-count-to-ten.rb"></script>
+``` ruby
+ print (1..10).sum
+```
![Awesome Placeholder Image](http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&text=Awesome%20Placeholder "So awesome.")
@@ -74,18 +85,26 @@ The next two examples are exactly the same, first in Java a really powerful and
### Java's "Hello, World"
-<script src="http://gist.github.com/654757.js?file=hello-world.java"></script>
+``` java
+ public class HelloWorld {
+ public static void main(String[] args) {
+ System.out.println("Hello, World");
+ }
+ }
+```
### Ruby's "Hello, World"
-<script src="http://gist.github.com/654757.js?file=hello-world.rb"></script>
+``` ruby
+ print 'Hello, World'
+```
Meanwhile, _Code_ is a language agnostic term for the source code that we write.
Further, source code is is any collection of statements or declarations written in some human-readable computer programming language.
The above examples I've listed are exactly that: Code.
-[def ruby](id:section-two)
+def ruby
--------------------------
> A dynamic, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity.
View
103 content/book/chapter/2.markdown
@@ -1,3 +1,104 @@
-# Ready! Set! Hack.
+Ready! Set! Hack.
+=================
**Note: I adore notes.**
+[T0](id:section-one) Installing Ruby
+-----------------------------------------------------
+
+\![Awesome Placeholder Image](http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&text=Awesome%20Placeholder "So awesome.")
+
+### Summary
+
+This is the most important Task in the entire book.
+This task will detail each step required to get Ruby running on your computer.
+Without Ruby you can't run the code you build and that makes this entire thing worthless.
+Oh we also talk about your workstation.
+
+### Source Code
+
+#### Ubuntu
+
+1. Open up Terminal:
+ 1. Click on the magnifying glass in the top right of your screen.
+ 2. Type `Terminal` and press enter.
+ 3. Type in the parts that look like `this` into Terminal and press enter.
+2. Install dependencies:
+ 2. `sudo apt-get install build-essential bison autoconf g++ \ `
+ 3. `zlib1g-dev libreadline-dev libsqlite3-dev \ `
+ 4. `libxslt-dev libxml2-dev libssl-dev \ `
+ 5. `curl git-core subversion` then `yes`.
+3. Install Ruby & Friends
+ 1. `bash < <( curl http://rvm.beginrescueend.com/releases/rvm-install-head )`
+ 2. `source ~/.rvm/scripts/rvm && rvm install --default 1.9.2`
+4. Setup your environment:
+ 1. `mkdir ~/repo ~/repo/rb ~/repo/rb/lytr && cd ~/repo/rb/lytr`
+ 2. `rvmsrc='[[ -s "~/.rvm/scripts/rvm" ]]' && echo $rvmsrc >> ~/.bash_profile && echo $rvmsrc >> ~/.bashrc`
+ 3. `curl https://github.com/krainboltgreene/dotfiles/blob/master/gemrc -o ~/.gemrc && gedit ~/.bashrc`
+ 4. In gedit add `# ` in front (On the same line) as: `[ -z "$PS1" ] && return` if it's there.
+5. Make yourself comfortable in Gedit:
+ 1. Turn on `Highlight Cur...` and `Highlight Mat...`
+ 2. Go to the Editor tab.
+ 3. `Tab Width` change to 4. Turn On `Insert Spaces Inst...` and `Enable Auto...`
+6. Save and close gedit. Type `exit` in the Terminal.
+7. Add the Terminal & Gedit shortcuts to the panel
+
+#### Windows
+
+1. Magic Happens.
+
+#### Mac OS X
+
+1. Open up Terminal:
+ 1. Click on the magnifying glass in the top right of your screen.
+ 2. Type `Terminal` and press enter.
+ 3. Type in the parts that look like `this` into Terminal.
+2. Install brew:
+ 1. `ruby -e "$(curl -fsSLk https://gist.github.com/raw/323731/install_homebrew.rb)"`
+ 2. `open https://connect.apple.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/MemberSite.woa/wa/getSoftware?bundleID=20792`
+ 3. Login and install XCode.
+3. Install Ruby & Friends:
+ 1. `brew install curl git`
+ 2. `bash < <( curl http://rvm.beginrescueend.com/releases/rvm-install-head )`
+4. Setup your environment:
+ 1. `mkdir ~/repo ~/repo/rb ~/repo/rb/lytr && cd ~/repo/rb/lytr`
+ 2. `source ~/.rvm/scripts/rvm && rvm install --default 1.9.2`
+ 3. `rvmsrc='[[ -s "$HOME/.rvm/scripts/rvm" ]] && echo $rvmsrc >> ~/.bash_profile && echo $rvmsrc >> ~/.bashrc`
+ 4. `curl https://github.com/krainboltgreene/dotfiles/blob/master/gemrc -o ~/.gemrc && open ~/.bashrc`
+ 5. In gedit add `# ` in front (On the same line) as: `[ -z "$PS1" ] && return` if it's there.
+5. Install and setup GEdit:
+ 1. ...
+ 2. ...
+ 3. ...
+ 4. In gedit, open the Edit menu and go to Preferences.
+ 5. Turn on `Highlight Cur...` and `Highlight Mat...`
+ 6. Go to the Editor tab.
+ 7. `Tab Width` change to 4. Turn On `Insert Spaces Inst...` and `Enable Auto...`
+ 8. Save and close gedit. Type `exit` in the Terminal.
+ 9. Add the Terminal & Gedit shortcuts to the dock
+
+### Results
+
+You should have working instances of Ruby Version Manager, Ruby 1.9.2, and Gedit.
+With a interpeter, an editor, and a computer you're well on your way to becoming a developer!
+If you happened to encoutner an error simply go to http://gist.github.com.
+Paste the error message (if you can) along with the step you were on.
+Then create a new issue at [my issues page](http://github.com/krainboltgreene/learn-you-the-ruby-for-awesome-power/issues) with the link to Gist.
+
+
+### Task Details
+
+The steps above assume one thing: You know the very basics about using your computer.
+If you don't understand how your computer works you need to take some classes, explore, and learn.
+Don't go beyond this point until you do.
+Ruby, and other languages, are tools and tools require that much respect to use.
+
+
+### Extra Credit
+
+1. Open a few text files with gedit and get to know the interface.
+2. Customize Gedit, Terminal, and your Operating System to better suit your style.
+3. Go to the Learn You The Ruby website and read through the glossary.
+4. Type these in the Terminal:
+ 1. `rvm use 1.9.2@global`
+ 2. `gem install bundler heroku rake rack`
+ 4. `rvm use 1.9.2`
View
14 content/style/main.sass
@@ -1 +1,15 @@
@import "extra/mixins", "extra/variables", "extra/reset"
+pre
+ width: 400px
+ @include outline
+ @include center
+ @include round
+ @include in-shadow
+ background: $grey + 45
+ & code.language-ruby
+ @include outline
+ margin-top: -15px
+ @include center
+ font-size: 14px
+ & .i
+ color: $bright_theme_color
View
10 lib/filters/redcarpet_filter.rb
@@ -0,0 +1,10 @@
+require 'redcarpet'
+
+class RedcarpetFilter < Nanoc3::Filter
+ identifier :redcarpet
+ type :text
+
+ def run(content, params={})
+ Redcarpet.new(content, :smart, :filter_html, :generate_toc, :fenced_code).to_html
+ end
+end
View
244 output/book/chapter/1/index.html
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
<title></title>
<meta charset='utf-8' />
<meta content='en' name='language' />
-<meta content='2011-06-05 02:26:04 -0700' name='created' />
+<meta content='2011-06-05 07:13:35 -0700' name='created' />
<meta content='Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene' name='author' />
<meta content='A Book On How To Program With The Ruby Language' name='description' />
<meta content='ruby, programming, hacking, learning, tutorial, book, free' name='keywords' />
@@ -19,87 +19,106 @@
<h1></h1>
</header>
<article>
-<h1>And Then There Was Ruby</h1>
+<h1 id="toc_0">And Then There Was Ruby</h1>
<p><strong>Note: If you want to get straight to hacking start at <a href="/chapter/2">Chapter 2: Ready! Set! Hack</a>.</strong></p>
-<h2><a id="section-one">HCP: Hackers, Code, and Programming</a></h2>
-
+<h2 id="toc_1">HCP: Hackers, Code, and Programming</h2>
<blockquote>
<p>The computer programmer is a creator of universes for which he alone is responsible.</p>
-<h2>Universes of virtually unlimited complexity can be created in the form of computer programs.</h2>
+<h2 id="toc_2">Universes of virtually unlimited complexity can be created in the form of computer programs.</h2>
<p><strong>Joseph Weizenbaum</strong>, Computer Power and Human Reason</p>
</blockquote>
-
-<p>If you've watched any news in the last ten years, read any newspapers in the last fifteen (Some people still do!), or talked to that technically inclined cousin of yours, then you've probably heard three words that are specific to this field:</p>
+<p>If you’ve watched any news in the last ten years, read any newspapers in the last fifteen (Some people still do!), or talked to that technically inclined cousin of yours, then you’ve probably heard three words that are specific to this field:</p>
<ol>
<li>Hacker (or Hacking)</li>
<li>Code (or coding)</li>
<li>Programming (Or programs)</li>
-</ol><p>Lets talk about each one specifically since they're going to be so prevalent in the next ten years of your life should you decide to be a programmer.
+</ol><p>Lets talk about each one specifically since theyre going to be so prevalent in the next ten years of your life should you decide to be a programmer.
The first and most complicated word is <em>Hacker</em>.
-You've probably heard it in a very negative tone, often defined as a person who uses computers to illegally gain access to computers to hinder or damage.
-Hell, you've probably had some idiot claim to be a hacker in order to intimidate you into doing something.</p>
+Youve probably heard it in a very negative tone, often defined as a person who uses computers to illegally gain access to computers to hinder or damage.
+Hell, youve probably had some idiot claim to be a hacker in order to intimidate you into doing something.</p>
-<p><strong>Guess what</strong>: That's not what <em>hacker</em> means.
-No, there's already a name for people who do what I just described: Criminals.
-They don't need a special name to help them appear more mysterious or dangerous.
+<p><strong>Guess what</strong>: Thats not what <em>hacker</em> means.
+No, theres already a name for people who do what I just described: Criminals.
+They dont need a special name to help them appear more mysterious or dangerous.
In reality, a hacker is a member of the hacker subculture and simply an individual who seeks to learn as much as possible using technology.
Usually under a self-defined code of ethics, not necessarily ones that reflect common law.
Many consider the only method of learning is to examine, since the information necessary for their own enlightenment is not free.‏</p>
-<p><img src="/image/hacker.png" title="Yeah, it's kinda like that." alt="Real Hackers"></p>
+<p><img src="/image/hacker.png" alt="Real Hackers" title="Yeah, it's kinda like that."></p>
<p>The latter two terms are less culturally significant but should still be defined and talked about: <em>Programming</em> is the act of writing code, using a programming language.
A programming language is the language we, humans, use to instruct computers, dumb pieces of plastic, on what to do.
-A program (or script) is a list of instructions that you've laid out for the computer to follow and complete.
+A program (or script) is a list of instructions that youve laid out for the computer to follow and complete.
Programs are sometimes called software, applications, or scripts depending on the complexity or detail involved in using them.</p>
<p>The act of programming is to write these scripts or applications in a programming language, like Ruby.
-A computer only knows how and when to do things if you tell it to in it's own language, Binary.</p>
-
-<h3>Binary's Count 1 To 10, Print Sum</h3>
-
-<pre><code>00110001 00000000 00000000
-00110001 00000001 00000001
-00110011 00000001 00000010
-01010001 00001011 00000010
-00100010 00000010 00001000
-01000011 00000001 00000000
-01000001 00000001 00000001
-00010000 00000010 00000000
-01100010 00000000 00000000
+A computer only knows how and when to do things if you tell it to in its own language, Binary.</p>
+
+<h3 id="toc_3">Binarys Count 1 To 10, Print Sum</h3>
+
+<pre><code class="binary"> 00110001 00000000 00000000
+ 00110001 00000001 00000001
+ 00110011 00000001 00000010
+ 01010001 00001011 00000010
+ 00100010 00000010 00001000
+ 01000011 00000001 00000000
+ 01000001 00000001 00000001
+ 00010000 00000010 00000000
+ 01100010 00000000 00000000
</code></pre>
<p>This program tells the computer to take every number from 1 to 10, add them together, and display the sum (55).
-It's complex, arcane, and completely unreadable to the naked eye for most people.
+Its complex, arcane, and completely unreadable to the naked eye for most people.
Would you believe that people actually programmed applications this way?
Simple software, like a calculator, required complex and time consuming work that was error prone and easily crashed.
The same code is written here in Ruby:</p>
-<h3>Ruby's Count 1 To 10, Print Sum</h3>
+<h3 id="toc_4">Rubys Count 1 To 10, Print Sum</h3>
-<script src="http://gist.github.com/654757.js?file=count-to-ten.rb"></script><p>Or even:</p>
+<pre><code class="ruby"> total = 0
+ count = 1
-<script src="http://gist.github.com/654757.js?file=alt-count-to-ten.rb"></script><p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" title="So awesome." alt="Awesome Placeholder Image"></p>
+ while count &lt;= 10
+ total += count
+ count += 1
+ end
+</code></pre>
-<p>It's obvious in the previous two examples that programming languages are a tool for making developing easier.
+<p>Or even:</p>
+
+<pre><code class="ruby"> print (1..10).sum
+</code></pre>
+
+<p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" alt="Awesome Placeholder Image" title="So awesome."></p>
+
+<p>It’s obvious in the previous two examples that programming languages are a tool for making developing easier.
Programming in Ruby works by writing text (like above), having the Ruby interpreter compile it, and getting the result of your work.
The next two examples are exactly the same, first in Java a really powerful and common language, the second in Ruby:</p>
-<h3>Java's "Hello, World"</h3>
+<h3 id="toc_5">Java’s “Hello, World</h3>
-<script src="http://gist.github.com/654757.js?file=hello-world.java"></script><h3>Ruby's "Hello, World"</h3>
+<pre><code class="java"> public class HelloWorld {
+ public static void main(String[] args) {
+ System.out.println(“Hello, World”);
+ }
+ }
+</code></pre>
-<script src="http://gist.github.com/654757.js?file=hello-world.rb"></script><p>Meanwhile, <em>Code</em> is a language agnostic term for the source code that we write.
-Further, source code is is any collection of statements or declarations written in some human-readable computer programming language.
-The above examples I've listed are exactly that: Code.</p>
+<h3 id="toc_6">Ruby’s “Hello, World”</h3>
-<h2><a id="section-two">def ruby</a></h2>
+<pre><code class="ruby"> print ‘Hello, World’
+</code></pre>
+
+<p>Meanwhile, <em>Code</em> is a language agnostic term for the source code that we write.
+Further, source code is is any collection of statements or declarations written in some human-readable computer programming language.
+The above examples I’ve listed are exactly that: Code.</p>
+<h2 id="toc_7">def ruby</h2>
<blockquote>
<p>A dynamic, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity.
It has an elegant syntax that is natural to read and easy to write.</p>
@@ -108,53 +127,52 @@
<p><strong>Ruby Lang</strong>, http://ruby-lang.org</p>
<p>Ruby is a dynamic, reflective, general purpose object-oriented programming language that combines syntax inspired by Perl with Smalltalk-like features.
-Ruby originated in Japan during the mid-1990s and was initially developed and designed by Yukihiro "Mat.
+Ruby originated in Japan during the mid-1990s and was initially developed and designed by Yukihiro Mat.
Matsumoto.
It is based on Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, Ada, and Lisp.</p>
<hr>
-<p><strong>Wikipedia</strong>, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby_(programming_language)</p>
+<p><strong>Wikipedia</strong>, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby<em>(programming</em>language)</p>
</blockquote>
+<p><img src="/image/from-japan.png" alt="It Came From Japana" title=":horror-face:"></p>
-<p><img src="/image/from-japan.png" title=":horror-face:" alt="It Came From Japana"></p>
-
-<p>You didn't come here to read about a few definitions, though.
-You came here to learn about Ruby (or else you're going to be mildly disappointed).
-So let's learn about Ruby: Ruby is a programming language.
+<p>You didn’t come here to read about a few definitions, though.
+You came here to learn about Ruby (or else you’re going to be mildly disappointed).
+So let’s learn about Ruby: Ruby is a programming language.
Ok, so you probably figured that out already.
-Here's some important information that wont make sense yet: The Ruby programming language is expressive, imperative, and object-oriented.
-Ruby doesn't require a compile step, but instead is interpreted by an interpreter.
+Heres some important information that wont make sense yet: The Ruby programming language is expressive, imperative, and object-oriented.
+Ruby doesnt require a compile step, but instead is interpreted by an interpreter.
The Ruby programming language is geared toward and designed for both simplicity and enjoyability.
-Ruby's goal is to make development very fun and easy for developers.</p>
-
-<blockquote><p>Experienced programmers should take note of the term "Object-Oriented.
-That's not "Object-Curious", or "Object-Casual.
-This isn't that one time at band camp when your program let another modify his orientation for the night.</p></blockquote>
-
-<p>This is an object-oriented language and you'll be dealing with Classes and Objects the entire time.
+Rubys goal is to make development very fun and easy for developers.</p>
+<blockquote>
+<p>Experienced programmers should take note of the term "Object-Oriented.
+Thats not "Object-Curious, or Object-Casual.
+This isnt that one time at band camp when your program let another modify his orientation for the night.</p>
+</blockquote>
+<p>This is an object-oriented language and youll be dealing with Classes and Objects the entire time.
Everything, and I do mean everything, is an Object in Ruby, even the results from methods (a more manlier word for function) are an Object.</p>
-<p>Ruby was officially named on 1993-02-24 in Japan by it's creator Yukihiro "Mat" Matsumoto.
+<p>Ruby was officially named on 1993-02-24 in Japan by its creator Yukihiro "Mat Matsumoto.
The language went public 1995-12-21 with Ruby v0.95.
-Ruby v1.0 wouldn't crawl around until a year later, 1996-12-25.
+Ruby v1.0 wouldnt crawl around until a year later, 1996-12-25.
Somewhere during the year 2000 Ruby would finally become used mainstream outside of Japan, and on 2001-12-15 the Pragmatic Programmers released Programming Ruby, otherwise known as <em>Pickaxe</em>.
2001 also happened to be the year of the ever successful convention, RubyConf?
which was first called RubyConf?.new(2001).
-It's an inside joke you'll get later.</p>
+Its an inside joke youll get later.</p>
-<p><img src="/image/matz.png" title="Matz: The Original Ruby Goatee" alt="The Real Matz"></p>
+<p><img src="/image/matz.png" alt="The Real Matz" title="Matz: The Original Ruby Goatee"></p>
-<p>The ball didn't start really rolling until David "DH.
+<p>The ball didnt start really rolling until David DH.
Heinmeier hit the scene.
Mr.
Heinemeier designed and created Rails (Usually called Ruby On Rails) and opened the source on 2004-07.
-He didn't give commit rights (The right to change the code) to anyone else until 2005-02 and even then it's a strict list.
+He didnt give commit rights (The right to change the code) to anyone else until 2005-02 and even then its a strict list.
Rails exploded onto the web development scene like the Virut virus on an unsuspecting computer.
DHH had single handedly made web development enjoyable, the cad.
Apple Inc.
picked up on this crazy development in the webtech scene and announced that Mac OS X (10.5, Leopard) would ship with the latest Rails in 2004-08.</p>
-<p>The real question you want to know (most likely) is what the language is "good for", or at least used for.
+<p>The real question you want to know (most likely) is what the language is "good for, or at least used for.
The answer to this is easy: Everything.
Want a script that sorts, edits, or deletes your files?
Can do.
@@ -163,7 +181,7 @@
Pushing out an extensive and complex web application?
Twitter, YelloPages, and Github did it with Rails.
You will be doing simpler things of course, but all these projects and more are within the grasp of even average people if they put their mind to it.
-In fact, here's a (very small) list of examples:</p>
+In fact, heres a (very small) list of examples:</p>
<ul>
<li>
@@ -175,80 +193,80 @@
<li>
<a href="http://rake.rubyforge.org/">Rake</a>, all the simplicity of Ruby for powerful makes.</li>
</ul><p>Ruby has a lot of good facets (haha, precious gem joke) that are very easy to identify: Ruby is powerful and elegant, easy to read and detailed, with enterprise and open source in mind.
-All these are pretty much buzz words when you get down too it so the real good side of Ruby is that it's easy and fun.
+All these are pretty much buzz words when you get down too it so the real good side of Ruby is that its easy and fun.
These are traits not often found in programming languages.
Like all programming languages and tools Ruby has a place and use that it is best fit for: Web development.</p>
-<p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" title="So awesome." alt="Awesome Placeholder Image"></p>
+<p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" alt="Awesome Placeholder Image" title="So awesome."></p>
<p>Like every other language Ruby has some bad parts too.
-The Ruby Community is so terrible that I've devoted an entire chapter just to the culture around Ruby.
+The Ruby Community is so terrible that Ive devoted an entire chapter just to the culture around Ruby.
The standard Ruby interpreter (1.8) is really slow compared to pretty much every other modern used language.
The latest stable version (1.9) is only just now coming into broad usage by developers.
-Ruby isn't scalable naturally for the most part, and requires external sources and languages to assist it.
-One programmer has told me that the long time solution to this was, "Run more machines with Ruby.
+Ruby isnt scalable naturally for the most part, and requires external sources and languages to assist it.
+One programmer has told me that the long time solution to this was, Run more machines with Ruby.
which is an obviously flawed approach.
-Open Ruby projects tend to have serious little or poor documentation and for the most part hasn't improved.</p>
+Open Ruby projects tend to have serious little or poor documentation and for the most part hasnt improved.</p>
-<h2><a id="section-three">The Ruby Revolution &amp; Renaissance</a></h2>
+<h2 id="toc_8"><a href="id:section-three">The Ruby Revolution &amp; Renaissance</a></h2>
-<p>Now that you know what Ruby is (or at least the definition of Ruby) and how it started, it's time to learn about the history.
+<p>Now that you know what Ruby is (or at least the definition of Ruby) and how it started, its time to learn about the history.
The era, called the <em>Ruby Revolution</em> by some, of most significance started in 2004.
The Ruby Revolution concerns the period of time where Rails hit the scene and started to cause a fuss among web developers.
The "fus.
would be called <em>Ruby Philosophy</em>.
-The core philosophy behind Ruby is "DRY: Don't Repeat Yourself".
-During this time period you can see at least three sides forming in the web development community: The older fellows who liked what they had (JavaEE, PHP) and didn't think this new fangled Ruby On Rails was worth the change, the younger developers who quite enjoyed the ease Rails and Ruby gave them, and those that didn't care either way.</p>
+The core philosophy behind Ruby is "DRY: Dont Repeat Yourself.
+During this time period you can see at least three sides forming in the web development community: The older fellows who liked what they had (JavaEE, PHP) and didnt think this new fangled Ruby On Rails was worth the change, the younger developers who quite enjoyed the ease Rails and Ruby gave them, and those that didnt care either way.</p>
<p>While web development and web frameworks existed long before Rails, it was commonly considered that web application development sucked.
It was something you had to really plow through without much help.
The idea that web development could be significantly easier made a lot of people happy.
-Of course, Ruby and Rails wasn't (and isn't) perfect, but it was the initial push toward making things easier that mattered.
-The thing is the Ruby Revolution wouldn't have happened without the success of Ruby On Rails with American developers.
+Of course, Ruby and Rails wasnt (and isnt) perfect, but it was the initial push toward making things easier that mattered.
+The thing is the Ruby Revolution wouldnt have happened without the success of Ruby On Rails with American developers.
Thanks to the Rails phenomenon the number of Ruby developers in the United states and European Union grew by incredible amounts.
-Even though there is an even smaller divide among Rubyists on Rails, we owe a lot of Ruby's following and popularity to Rails.</p>
+Even though there is an even smaller divide among Rubyists on Rails, we owe a lot of Rubys following and popularity to Rails.</p>
-<p><img src="/image/dhh.png" title="DHH: The Ruby Pretty Boy" alt="David Heineiehem Handsomface"></p>
+<p><img src="/image/dhh.png" alt="David Heineiehem Handsomface" title="DHH: The Ruby Pretty Boy"></p>
<p>As with all revolutions there had to end, and it did end around the year 2009.
Though while the <em>Ruby Revolution</em> ended many claimed that 2010 will be the start of the <em>Ruby Renaissance</em>.
-An era for Ruby to refine many aspects of the language and it's parts.
+An era for Ruby to refine many aspects of the language and its parts.
At the end of 2009 Ruby already had four variations, the beginning of a Standard, and the rise of three other major web frameworks beyond Rails.
More importantly many companies were (and are) specifically hiring Ruby and Ruby On Rails developers.</p>
<p>A lot of articles have been written and will be written about the Ruby Revolution and the change that Ruby has made in the web development area.
-It's a good idea to keep in mind that Ruby's Revolution and Renaissance didn't sprout from a void.
-The real source of Ruby's success is you, future developers and users.</p>
+Its a good idea to keep in mind that Rubys Revolution and Renaissance didnt sprout from a void.
+The real source of Rubys success is you, future developers and users.</p>
-<h2><a id="section-four">Rock Out To The Rock Star</a></h2>
+<h2 id="toc_9"><a href="id:section-four">Rock Out To The Rock Star</a></h2>
<p>The term Rockstar, or Rock Star, in the context of developers or developing is commonly meant to describe someone who has a cult like following.
Rock Stars are programmers who do things (sometimes amazing things) and advance the community or the language.
Like Jimi Hendrix, Elvis, and Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Rock Stars usually have a large amount of followers and disciples that watch their every word and movement.
-Rock Stars don't have everything going for them however.
-Much like the music gods they're titled after eventually the Rock Star burns out and either becomes destructive or washes away in mystery.
+Rock Stars dont have everything going for them however.
+Much like the music gods theyre titled after eventually the Rock Star burns out and either becomes destructive or washes away in mystery.
I know, who thought Programming could be so dramatic?</p>
<p>The Ruby Community has two Rock Stars worth taking serious notice of.
Both of these Rock Stars are people I look up to and look forward to matching one day.
They have changed the face of Ruby and will be remembered for a very long time.
-It's hard to look at Ruby and not see the areas that they've changed and so they are in my Ruby Rock Star Hall of Fame, if you will.
+Its hard to look at Ruby and not see the areas that theyve changed and so they are in my Ruby Rock Star Hall of Fame, if you will.
The first is Zed Shaw, someone whom you might already know from his rants and usual internet ravings.
A musician and a talent, he has since left the Ruby community.
The second is Why The Lucky Stiff, or _why, and has paved the path for a kinder and more enjoyable Ruby experience for a lot of new people.
He is also considered to be one of the more wild aspects of Ruby developing.
-He has since left the internet completely, committing what many consider to be "Internet Suicide."</p>
+He has since left the internet completely, committing what many consider to be Internet Suicide.</p>
-<p><img src="/image/_why.png" title="_why: Pure Imagination" alt="why the lucky stiff"></p>
+<p><img src="/image/_why.png" alt="why the lucky stiff" title="_why: Pure Imagination"></p>
<p>Zed Shaw developed Mongrel, an open-source HTTP library and web server for Ruby web applications and is mostly recognized for that accomplishment.
He has since moved on to building Mongrel 2 (Not Ruby), Lamson, and the Liberlist.
-Attaining Rock Star status due to his heavy influence in how the community deals with Corporate presence, Zed Shaw burned out finally with a blog post called "Rails Is A Ghetto."
+Attaining Rock Star status due to his heavy influence in how the community deals with Corporate presence, Zed Shaw burned out finally with a blog post called Rails Is A Ghetto.
The blog post no longer exists on his web site and all that remains is a note by him for programmers to follow the quiet helpers who look after those in need rather than the tough jocks of our community, like himself.</p>
-<p><img src="/image/zed-shaw.png" title="Zed Shaw: Born to code." alt="Zed Shaw"></p>
+<p><img src="/image/zed-shaw.png" alt="Zed Shaw" title="Zed Shaw: Born to code."></p>
-<p>You might wonder why I don't use _why's real name, and instead use his moniker Why The Lucky Stiff.
+<p>You might wonder why I dont use _whys real name, and instead use his moniker Why The Lucky Stiff.
This is because no one currently knows his true identity and is willing to tell.
_why has developed many projects that have changed the face of the Ruby Community.
His efforts to guide the Ruby Community into a place where new people are met with enthusiasm and not disgust have put him in the Rock Star Hall of Fame along with Zed Shaw.
@@ -256,40 +274,40 @@
One day all of his repositories and social networking accounts were closed and gone.
Many of his works are now mirrored, but developers of Ruby have all felt his impact.</p>
-<p>While Rock Stars have a limited time to do good before they burn out it's important to understand that Rock Stars do in fact do good.
+<p>While Rock Stars have a limited time to do good before they burn out its important to understand that Rock Stars do in fact do good.
Think of them as Nitrous Oxide Systems, that for a short period drastically increase the speed the community moves at.
The Ruby Community has a lot to gain from these men of action, despite their short social life spans.</p>
-<h2><a id="section-five">The Cherry Kool-Aid</a></h2>
+<h2 id="toc_10"><a href="id:section-five">The Cherry Kool-Aid</a></h2>
<p>Like many geek cultures that exist today the programming communities tend to have a very common problem: Power users, fanboys, and evangelists.
Fanatics of a religion, political party, or creed have always existed and the programming culture is no less afflicted by them.
In fact due to the social ineptitude many geeks live with we are more prone to the red haze of cultism.
-You're mistaken if you think I'm joking when I say that there have been actual fist fights over which indentation style to use in C, or what command line editor to write with.
-Despite the Hacker culture's focus on individuality and freedom, the Ruby world is still a geek world.</p>
+Youre mistaken if you think Im joking when I say that there have been actual fist fights over which indentation style to use in C, or what command line editor to write with.
+Despite the Hacker cultures focus on individuality and freedom, the Ruby world is still a geek world.</p>
-<p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" title="So awesome." alt="Awesome Placeholder Image"></p>
+<p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" alt="Awesome Placeholder Image" title="So awesome."></p>
<p>Ever since Rails rolled out the Ruby community has stepped knee deep in hype and hyperbole.
It started off as lot of programmers becoming very enthusiastic about a new and expressive language.
-It didn't help that the community had a lot of early Rock Stars emerging from Rails, and that they talked a lot of smack about other languages.
+It didnt help that the community had a lot of early Rock Stars emerging from Rails, and that they talked a lot of smack about other languages.
Many touted Ruby as the Great White Hope of Programming.
-It's a general consensus among Rubyits that the egotism and dickery comes directly from Rails's growth.</p>
+Its a general consensus among Rubyits that the egotism and dickery comes directly from Railss growth.</p>
<p>The reality here is that geeks of any flavor tend to gush over new toys and geeks of any flavor tend to rant about others gushing.
In recent years the type of behavior described has slowly ground to a halt as the fanatics are pushed aside and the community, and language, matures.
It is important to realize that his behavior stems from ignorance and the best cure is education.
We as a group cannot abide by this blind fervor because it will ultimately ruin a lot of what Ruby stands for: The enjoyment of developing.</p>
-<p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" title="So awesome." alt="Awesome Placeholder Image"></p>
+<p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" alt="Awesome Placeholder Image" title="So awesome."></p>
-<h2><a id="section-six">Credits &amp; Licensing</a></h2>
+<h2 id="toc_11"><a href="id:section-six">Credits &amp; Licensing</a></h2>
-<p>Alright, you've gotten through the boring part of the book.
+<p>Alright, youve gotten through the boring part of the book.
You know about Ruby, the history, and some of the pitfalls of the community.
-You're equipped, now, to start learning Ruby and building applications.
-Hopefully you can start understand why I've written this guide, especially this way, once you get into Ruby developing on your own.
-This book is of course not the last thing you'll read.
+Youre equipped, now, to start learning Ruby and building applications.
+Hopefully you can start understand why Ive written this guide, especially this way, once you get into Ruby developing on your own.
+This book is of course not the last thing youll read.
In fact you should go on to read these great books, because they inspired me to write this:</p>
<ul>
@@ -306,12 +324,12 @@
<li><a href="http://learnyouahaskell.com/">Learn You A Haskell For Great Good</a></li>
<li><a href="http://learnyousomeerlang.com/">Learn You Some Erlang For Great Good</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Learning_Clojure">Learning Clojure</a></li>
-</ul><p>Also, here's the <a href="/book/copyright">copyright</a>.</p>
+</ul><p>Also, heres the <a href="/book/copyright">copyright</a>.</p>
-<h2><a id="section-seven">How This Book Works</a></h2>
+<h2 id="toc_12"><a href="id:section-seven">How This Book Works</a></h2>
-<p><strong>Good!</strong> You've heroically made it to the end of Chapter One.
-I promise the next chapter won't be too terribly long.
+<p><strong>Good!</strong> Youve heroically made it to the end of Chapter One.
+I promise the next chapter wont be too terribly long.
In fact chapters three through ten will all be ten sections long, while chapter two will have 1 setup section and 10 learning sections.
Each section of each chapter will be in five important sections:</p>
@@ -321,23 +339,23 @@
<li>A result of running the code</li>
<li>A detailed description of each (new) important part</li>
<li>And some extra credit tasks</li>
-</ul><p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" title="So awesome." alt="Awesome Placeholder Image"></p>
+</ul><p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" alt="Awesome Placeholder Image" title="So awesome."></p>
-<p>Now that we know all the pieces to the puzzle it's time to learn how to read and use this book.
+<p>Now that we know all the pieces to the puzzle its time to learn how to read and use this book.
Follow each step exactly and then go wild:</p>
<ol>
-<li>Read the brief description, don't worry if you don't fully understand it</li>
-<li>Create a new file, in your projects directly (We'll get to that), called <code>lytr#.rb</code> and replace the # with the task number.</li>
+<li>Read the brief description, dont worry if you dont fully understand it</li>
+<li>Create a new file, in your projects directly (Well get to that), called <code>lytr#.rb</code> and replace the # with the task number.</li>
<li>Write each line from the source code into the file. <strong>Do not copy and paste</strong>. The point is to learn by doing.</li>
<li>Read the detailed description and the code you just wrote.</li>
-<li>Run the code, see if you get the desired output. If you don't, return to step 3. <em><strong>Note</strong>: Some sections will have <strong>secret bugs</strong> just for you to figure out!</em>
+<li>Run the code, see if you get the desired output. If you dont, return to step 3. <em><strong>Note</strong>: Some sections will have <strong>secret bugs</strong> just for you to figure out!</em>
</li>
<li>If you feel confidant check out the extra credit portions, change the code around, and get messy!</li>
</ol><p>It is very important that you type each bit of source code out.
It will make the learning process a whole lot easier and give you a deeper, first hand, understanding of writing Ruby code.
-Once you've followed each step carefully you should understand another portion of how to program with Ruby.
-Initially this might be a very difficult way of learning how to program with Ruby, but if you stick with it you'll be hacking out apps left and right.
+Once youve followed each step carefully you should understand another portion of how to program with Ruby.
+Initially this might be a very difficult way of learning how to program with Ruby, but if you stick with it youll be hacking out apps left and right.
One last thing before we start you on the really interesting things: Have.
Fun.</p>
</article>
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145 output/book/chapter/2/index.html
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
<title></title>
<meta charset='utf-8' />
<meta content='en' name='language' />
-<meta content='2011-06-05 02:26:04 -0700' name='created' />
+<meta content='2011-06-05 06:59:26 -0700' name='created' />
<meta content='Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene' name='author' />
<meta content='A Book On How To Program With The Ruby Language' name='description' />
<meta content='ruby, programming, hacking, learning, tutorial, book, free' name='keywords' />
@@ -19,9 +19,150 @@
<h1></h1>
</header>
<article>
-<h1>Ready! Set! Hack.</h1>
+<h1 id="toc_0">Ready! Set! Hack.</h1>
<p><strong>Note: I adore notes.</strong></p>
+
+<h2 id="toc_1"><a href="id:section-one">T0</a> Installing Ruby</h2>
+
+<p><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300/00/44.png&amp;text=Awesome%20Placeholder" alt="Awesome Placeholder Image" title="So awesome.">
+</p>
+
+<h3 id="toc_2">Summary</h3>
+
+<p>This is the most important Task in the entire book.
+This task will detail each step required to get Ruby running on your computer.
+Without Ruby you can&rsquo;t run the code you build and that makes this entire thing worthless.
+Oh we also talk about your workstation.</p>
+
+<h3 id="toc_3">Source Code</h3>
+
+<h4 id="toc_4">Ubuntu</h4>
+
+<ol>
+<li>Open up Terminal:
+
+<ol>
+<li>Click on the magnifying glass in the top right of your screen.</li>
+<li>Type <code>Terminal</code> and press enter.</li>
+<li>Type in the parts that look like <code>this</code> into Terminal and press enter.</li>
+</ol></li>
+<li>Install dependencies:
+
+<ol>
+<li><code>sudo apt-get install build-essential bison autoconf g++ \</code></li>
+<li><code>zlib1g-dev libreadline-dev libsqlite3-dev \</code></li>
+<li><code>libxslt-dev libxml2-dev libssl-dev \</code></li>
+<li><code>curl git-core subversion</code> then <code>yes</code>.</li>
+</ol></li>
+<li>Install Ruby &amp; Friends
+
+<ol>
+<li><code>bash &lt; &lt;( curl http://rvm.beginrescueend.com/releases/rvm-install-head )</code></li>
+<li><code>source ~/.rvm/scripts/rvm &amp;&amp; rvm install &mdash;default 1.9.2</code></li>
+</ol></li>
+<li>Setup your environment:
+
+<ol>
+<li><code>mkdir ~/repo ~/repo/rb ~/repo/rb/lytr &amp;&amp; cd ~/repo/rb/lytr</code></li>
+<li><code>rvmsrc=&lsquo;[[ -s &ldquo;~/.rvm/scripts/rvm&rdquo; ]]&rsquo; &amp;&amp; echo $rvmsrc &gt;&gt; ~/.bash_profile &amp;&amp; echo $rvmsrc &gt;&gt; ~/.bashrc</code></li>
+<li><code>curl https://github.com/krainboltgreene/dotfiles/blob/master/gemrc -o ~/.gemrc &amp;&amp; gedit ~/.bashrc</code></li>
+<li>In gedit add <code>#</code> in front (On the same line) as: <code>[ -z &ldquo;$PS1&rdquo; ] &amp;&amp; return</code> if it&rsquo;s there.</li>
+</ol></li>
+<li>Make yourself comfortable in Gedit:
+
+<ol>
+<li>Turn on <code>Highlight Cur&hellip;</code> and <code>Highlight Mat&hellip;</code></li>
+<li>Go to the Editor tab.</li>
+<li><code>Tab Width</code> change to 4. Turn On <code>Insert Spaces Inst&hellip;</code> and <code>Enable Auto&hellip;</code></li>
+</ol></li>
+<li>Save and close gedit. Type <code>exit</code> in the Terminal.</li>
+<li>Add the Terminal &amp; Gedit shortcuts to the panel</li>
+</ol>
+
+<h4 id="toc_5">Windows</h4>
+
+<ol>
+<li>Magic Happens.</li>
+</ol>
+
+<h4 id="toc_6">Mac OS X</h4>
+
+<ol>
+<li>Open up Terminal:
+
+<ol>
+<li>Click on the magnifying glass in the top right of your screen.</li>
+<li>Type <code>Terminal</code> and press enter.</li>
+<li>Type in the parts that look like <code>this</code> into Terminal.</li>
+</ol></li>
+<li>Install brew:
+
+<ol>
+<li><code>ruby -e &ldquo;$(curl -fsSLk https://gist.github.com/raw/323731/install_homebrew.rb)&rdquo;</code></li>
+<li><code>open https://connect.apple.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/MemberSite.woa/wa/getSoftware?bundleID=20792</code></li>
+<li>Login and install XCode.</li>
+</ol></li>
+<li>Install Ruby &amp; Friends:
+
+<ol>
+<li><code>brew install curl git</code></li>
+<li><code>bash &lt; &lt;( curl http://rvm.beginrescueend.com/releases/rvm-install-head )</code></li>
+</ol></li>
+<li>Setup your environment:
+
+<ol>
+<li><code>mkdir ~/repo ~/repo/rb ~/repo/rb/lytr &amp;&amp; cd ~/repo/rb/lytr</code></li>
+<li><code>source ~/.rvm/scripts/rvm &amp;&amp; rvm install &mdash;default 1.9.2</code></li>
+<li><code>rvmsrc=&lsquo;[[ -s &ldquo;$HOME/.rvm/scripts/rvm&rdquo; ]] &amp;&amp; echo $rvmsrc &gt;&gt; ~/.bash_profile &amp;&amp; echo $rvmsrc &gt;&gt; ~/.bashrc</code></li>
+<li><code>curl https://github.com/krainboltgreene/dotfiles/blob/master/gemrc -o ~/.gemrc &amp;&amp; open ~/.bashrc</code></li>
+<li>In gedit add <code>#</code> in front (On the same line) as: <code>[ -z &ldquo;$PS1&rdquo; ] &amp;&amp; return</code> if it&rsquo;s there.</li>
+</ol></li>
+<li>Install and setup GEdit:
+
+<ol>
+<li>&hellip;</li>
+<li>&hellip;</li>
+<li>&hellip;</li>
+<li>In gedit, open the Edit menu and go to Preferences.</li>
+<li>Turn on <code>Highlight Cur&hellip;</code> and <code>Highlight Mat&hellip;</code></li>
+<li>Go to the Editor tab.</li>
+<li><code>Tab Width</code> change to 4. Turn On <code>Insert Spaces Inst&hellip;</code> and <code>Enable Auto&hellip;</code></li>
+<li>Save and close gedit. Type <code>exit</code> in the Terminal.</li>
+<li>Add the Terminal &amp; Gedit shortcuts to the dock</li>
+</ol></li>
+</ol>
+
+<h3 id="toc_7">Results</h3>
+
+<p>You should have working instances of Ruby Version Manager, Ruby 1.9.2, and Gedit.
+With a interpeter, an editor, and a computer you&rsquo;re well on your way to becoming a developer!
+If you happened to encoutner an error simply go to http://gist.github.com.
+Paste the error message (if you can) along with the step you were on.
+Then create a new issue at <a href="http://github.com/krainboltgreene/learn-you-the-ruby-for-awesome-power/issues">my issues page</a> with the link to Gist.</p>
+
+<h3 id="toc_8">Task Details</h3>
+
+<p>The steps above assume one thing: You know the very basics about using your computer.
+If you don&rsquo;t understand how your computer works you need to take some classes, explore, and learn.
+Don&rsquo;t go beyond this point until you do.
+Ruby, and other languages, are tools and tools require that much respect to use.</p>
+
+<h3 id="toc_9">Extra Credit</h3>
+
+<ol>
+<li>Open a few text files with gedit and get to know the interface.</li>
+<li>Customize Gedit, Terminal, and your Operating System to better suit your style.</li>
+<li>Go to the Learn You The Ruby website and read through the glossary.</li>
+<li>Type these in the Terminal:
+
+<ol>
+<li><code>rvm use 1.9.2@global</code></li>
+<li><code>gem install bundler heroku rake rack</code></li>
+<li><code>rvm use 1.9.2</code></li>
+</ol></li>
+</ol>
+
</article>
<footer>
<p>Copyright 2011 <a href="mailto:kurtisrainboltgreene@gmail.com">Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene</a></p>
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@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
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<meta charset='utf-8' />
<meta content='en' name='language' />
-<meta content='2011-06-05 02:26:04 -0700' name='created' />
+<meta content='2011-06-05 06:59:26 -0700' name='created' />
<meta content='Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene' name='author' />
<meta content='A Book On How To Program With The Ruby Language' name='description' />
<meta content='ruby, programming, hacking, learning, tutorial, book, free' name='keywords' />
@@ -19,7 +19,8 @@
<h1></h1>
</header>
<article>
-<h1>The Trail To Neverland</h1>
+<h1 id="toc_0">The Trail To Neverland</h1>
+
</article>
<footer>
<p>Copyright 2011 <a href="mailto:kurtisrainboltgreene@gmail.com">Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene</a></p>
View
2 output/book/chapter/4/index.html
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
<title></title>
<meta charset='utf-8' />
<meta content='en' name='language' />
-<meta content='2011-06-05 02:26:04 -0700' name='created' />
+<meta content='2011-06-05 06:59:26 -0700' name='created' />
<meta content='Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene' name='author' />
<meta content='A Book On How To Program With The Ruby Language' name='description' />
<meta content='ruby, programming, hacking, learning, tutorial, book, free' name='keywords' />
View
2 output/book/chapter/5/index.html
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
<title></title>
<meta charset='utf-8' />
<meta content='en' name='language' />
-<meta content='2011-06-05 02:26:04 -0700' name='created' />
+<meta content='2011-06-05 06:59:26 -0700' name='created' />
<meta content='Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene' name='author' />
<meta content='A Book On How To Program With The Ruby Language' name='description' />
<meta content='ruby, programming, hacking, learning, tutorial, book, free' name='keywords' />
View
101 output/book/frequently-asked-questions/index.html
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
<title></title>
<meta charset='utf-8' />
<meta content='en' name='language' />
-<meta content='2011-06-05 02:26:04 -0700' name='created' />
+<meta content='2011-06-05 06:59:26 -0700' name='created' />
<meta content='Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene' name='author' />
<meta content='A Book On How To Program With The Ruby Language' name='description' />
<meta content='ruby, programming, hacking, learning, tutorial, book, free' name='keywords' />
@@ -19,79 +19,80 @@
<h1></h1>
</header>
<article>
-<h1>FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS</h1>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: Is (Ruby||Programming) hard to learn?</p></blockquote>
-
+<h1 id="toc_0">FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS</h1>
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: Is (Ruby||Programming) hard to learn?</p>
+</blockquote>
<p><strong>A</strong>: Programming is largely four things: Effort, Learning, Syntax, and Paradigms.
-This shouldn't be surprising, but the effort is the hardest part about learning how to program.
-Without the effort to work on things yourself you'll never go forward as a learner, no matter how much you read.
+This shouldn&rsquo;t be surprising, but the effort is the hardest part about learning how to program.
+Without the effort to work on things yourself you&rsquo;ll never go forward as a learner, no matter how much you read.
The latter three are self explanitory, but here you go: You have to be willing to learn, constantly.
Programming is a moving target even if you want to work with old stuff.
Finally, learning any language requires learning the facets of the Paradigm and the particular syntax the language uses.</p>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: Who are you?</p></blockquote>
-
-<p><strong>A</strong>: I'm a hacker, writer, designer, and father.
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: Who are you?</p>
+</blockquote>
+<p><strong>A</strong>: I&rsquo;m a hacker, writer, designer, and father.
I have a keen interest in pushing the programming community forward by making it easier to jump into.
Luckily I was gifted with the ability, fortitude, and foolishness to write a learning book.</p>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: Why do you like Ruby?</p></blockquote>
-
-<p><strong>A</strong>: I like Ruby because it's expressive syntax, and it's affinity for Domain Specific Languages.
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: Why do you like Ruby?</p>
+</blockquote>
+<p><strong>A</strong>: I like Ruby because it&rsquo;s expressive syntax, and it&rsquo;s affinity for Domain Specific Languages.
It was the first language I ever used seriously, and I hope to continue working with it.
It also happens that I can make a lot of money developing in Ruby.</p>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: Who built this website?</p></blockquote>
-
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: Who built this website?</p>
+</blockquote>
<p><strong>A</strong>: I built this website!
All of it.
To elaborate I wrote the HTML with HAML, and the CSS with SASS.
Each chapter is formatted with the Discount markdown language.
The web site runs on Sinatra, a simple micro web framework.</p>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: Why did you build this website?</p></blockquote>
-
-<p><strong>A</strong>: I built this website because I felt the tutorials out there, excluding _why's, were dry and unapproachable.
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: Why did you build this website?</p>
+</blockquote>
+<p><strong>A</strong>: I built this website because I felt the tutorials out there, excluding _why&rsquo;s, were dry and unapproachable.
For a language that is as expressive and fun to develop with as Ruby, this seems like such a tragedy.</p>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: Have you built any others?</p></blockquote>
-
-<p><strong>A</strong>: Other <strong>Learn You The</strong>'s? Not yet, but I seriously plan to.
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: Have you built any others?</p>
+</blockquote>
+<p><strong>A</strong>: Other <strong>Learn You The</strong>&rsquo;s? Not yet, but I seriously plan to.
I look forward to finishing the LYTR website only to do a Factor, HTML/CSS, and many many more if I have the time.
-It's a rather time consuming task and I do love to bog myself down in projects.</p>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: Can you help me make my own?</p></blockquote>
-
+It&rsquo;s a rather time consuming task and I do love to bog myself down in projects.</p>
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: Can you help me make my own?</p>
+</blockquote>
<p><strong>A</strong>: I can and will help those who want to help others, all you have to do is contact
me.</p>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: You stole this from (LYAH || LYSE || LPTHW), didn't you!?</p></blockquote>
-
-<p><strong>A</strong>: Arrrgh, you found out my diabolical scheme...
-Actually, no it's more like "I was incredibly inspired by that book."
-The creators seem to enjoy my book, and that's really awesome for me.</p>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: Is this website available in Russian?</p></blockquote>
-
-<p><strong>A</strong>: No, sadly it isn't available in Russian...Yet!
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: You stole this from (LYAH || LYSE || LPTHW), didn&rsquo;t you!?</p>
+</blockquote>
+<p><strong>A</strong>: Arrrgh, you found out my diabolical scheme&hellip;
+Actually, no it&rsquo;s more like &ldquo;I was incredibly inspired by that book.&rdquo;
+The creators seem to enjoy my book, and that&rsquo;s really awesome for me.</p>
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: Is this website available in Russian?</p>
+</blockquote>
+<p><strong>A</strong>: No, sadly it isn&rsquo;t available in Russian&hellip;Yet!
I plan to have this work translated into as many languages as I possibly can.
At the very least provide links to Google Translate.
-Because I'm lazy and poor, and that is easy and free.</p>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: What's with the duck and Soviet theme then?</p></blockquote>
-
-<p><strong>A</strong>: That's actually a good question.
-It's a rather obscure joke that I will attempt to explain:
+Because I&rsquo;m lazy and poor, and that is easy and free.</p>
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: What&rsquo;s with the duck and Soviet theme then?</p>
+</blockquote>
+<p><strong>A</strong>: That&rsquo;s actually a good question.
+It&rsquo;s a rather obscure joke that I will attempt to explain:
You see, Ruby is a Duck-Typed language, right?
And Ruby, the precious gem, is red (So is the color, obviously)!
-...Which is the primary color in Soviet Russia!
+&hellip;Which is the primary color in Soviet Russia!
So you see, it all makes sense:
<em>In Soviet Ruby, Duck Types You!</em></p>
-
-<blockquote><p><strong>Q</strong>: Are you a Socialist/Communist/Leninist?</p></blockquote>
-
+<blockquote>
+<p><strong>Q</strong>: Are you a Socialist/Communist/Leninist?</p>
+</blockquote>
<p><strong>A</strong>: I do sport an awesome goatee.</p>
+
</article>
<footer>
<p>Copyright 2011 <a href="mailto:kurtisrainboltgreene@gmail.com">Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene</a></p>
View
15 output/book/license/index.html
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
<title></title>
<meta charset='utf-8' />
<meta content='en' name='language' />
-<meta content='2011-06-05 02:26:04 -0700' name='created' />
+<meta content='2011-06-05 06:59:26 -0700' name='created' />
<meta content='Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene' name='author' />
<meta content='A Book On How To Program With The Ruby Language' name='description' />
<meta content='ruby, programming, hacking, learning, tutorial, book, free' name='keywords' />
@@ -19,12 +19,12 @@
<h1></h1>
</header>
<article>
-<h1>Copyright</h1>
+<h1 id="toc_0">Copyright</h1>
<p>This work is split into two parts: Literature and Source Code.
Each part has a different license attached.</p>
-<h2>Literature</h2>
+<h2 id="toc_1">Literature</h2>
<pre><code>Learn You The Ruby For Awesome Power[0] by Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene[1] is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License[2].
@@ -36,12 +36,12 @@
[3]: http://learnyoutheruby.org/source.tar.gz
</code></pre>
-<h2>Source Code</h2>
+<h2 id="toc_2">Source Code</h2>
-<pre><code>Copyright (c) 2011 Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene
+<pre><code>Copyright &copy; 2011 Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
-of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
+of this software and associated documentation files (the &ldquo;Software&rdquo;), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@
The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.
-THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
+THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED &ldquo;AS IS&rdquo;, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER
@@ -57,6 +57,7 @@
OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN
THE SOFTWARE.
</code></pre>
+
</article>
<footer>
<p>Copyright 2011 <a href="mailto:kurtisrainboltgreene@gmail.com">Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene</a></p>
View
89 output/book/table-of-contents/index.html
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
<title></title>
<meta charset='utf-8' />
<meta content='en' name='language' />
-<meta content='2011-06-05 02:26:04 -0700' name='created' />
+<meta content='2011-06-05 06:59:26 -0700' name='created' />
<meta content='Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene' name='author' />
<meta content='A Book On How To Program With The Ruby Language' name='description' />
<meta content='ruby, programming, hacking, learning, tutorial, book, free' name='keywords' />
@@ -19,11 +19,10 @@
<h1></h1>
</header>
<article>
-<h1>Table Of Contents</h1>
+<h1 id="toc_0">Table Of Contents</h1>
<ol>
-<li>
-<p><a href="/book/chapter/1">And Then There Was Ruby</a></p>
+<li><p><a href="/book/chapter/1">And Then There Was Ruby</a></p>
<ul>
<li><a href="/book/chapter/1#section-one">HCP: Hackers, Code, And Programming</a></li>
@@ -33,57 +32,51 @@
<li><a href="/book/chapter/1#section-five">The Cherry Kool-Aid</a></li>
<li><a href="/book/chapter/1#section-six">Credits &amp; License</a></li>
<li><a href="/book/chapter/1#section-seven">How This Book Works</a></li>
-</ul>
-</li>
-<li>
-<p><a href="/book/chapter/2">Ready! Set! Hack.</a></p>
+</ul></li>
+<li><p><a href="/book/chapter/2">Ready! Set! Hack.</a></p>
<ul>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-one">Task 0 - Installing</a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-two">Task 1 - Puts and Strings</a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-three">Task 2 - Print, Comments, and Backslash Characters</a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-four">Task 3 - Numbers, Math, and Interpolation</a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-five">Task 4 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-six">Task 5 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-seven">Task 6 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-eight">Task 7 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-nine">Task 8 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-ten">Task 9 - </a></li>
-</ul>
-</li>
-<li>
-<p><a href="/book/chapter/3">The Trail To Neverland</a></p>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-one">Task 0 &ndash; Installing</a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-two">Task 1 &ndash; Puts and Strings</a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-three">Task 2 &ndash; Print, Comments, and Backslash Characters</a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-four">Task 3 &ndash; Numbers, Math, and Interpolation</a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-five">Task 4 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-six">Task 5 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-seven">Task 6 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-eight">Task 7 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-nine">Task 8 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/2#section-ten">Task 9 &ndash; </a></li>
+</ul></li>
+<li><p><a href="/book/chapter/3">The Trail To Neverland</a></p>
<ul>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-one">Task 10 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-two">Task 11 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-three">Task 12 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-four">Task 13 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-five">Task 14 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-six">Task 15 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-seven">Task 16 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-eight">Task 17 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-nine">Task 18 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-ten">Task 19 - </a></li>
-</ul>
-</li>
-<li>
-<p><a href="/book/chapter/4">It's Rubies All The Way Down</a></p>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-one">Task 10 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-two">Task 11 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-three">Task 12 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-four">Task 13 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-five">Task 14 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-six">Task 15 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-seven">Task 16 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-eight">Task 17 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-nine">Task 18 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/3#section-ten">Task 19 &ndash; </a></li>
+</ul></li>
+<li><p><a href="/book/chapter/4">It&rsquo;s Rubies All The Way Down</a></p>
<ul>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-one">Task 20 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-two">Task 21 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-three">Task 22 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-four">Task 23 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-five">Task 24 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-six">Task 25 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-seven">Task 26 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-eight">Task 27 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-nine">Task 28 - </a></li>
-<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-ten">Task 29 - </a></li>
-</ul>
-</li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-one">Task 20 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-two">Task 21 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-three">Task 22 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-four">Task 23 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-five">Task 24 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-six">Task 25 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-seven">Task 26 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-eight">Task 27 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-nine">Task 28 &ndash; </a></li>
+<li><a href="/book/chapter/4#section-ten">Task 29 &ndash; </a></li>
+</ul></li>
</ol>
+
</article>
<footer>
<p>Copyright 2011 <a href="mailto:kurtisrainboltgreene@gmail.com">Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene</a></p>
View
8 output/index.html
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
<title></title>
<meta charset='utf-8' />
<meta content='en' name='language' />
-<meta content='2011-06-05 02:26:04 -0700' name='created' />
+<meta content='2011-06-05 06:59:26 -0700' name='created' />
<meta content='Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene' name='author' />
<meta content='A Book On How To Program With The Ruby Language' name='description' />
<meta content='ruby, programming, hacking, learning, tutorial, book, free' name='keywords' />
@@ -19,9 +19,11 @@
<h1></h1>
</header>
<article>
-<h1>Learn You The Ruby For Awesome Power</h1>
+<h1 id="toc_0">Learn You The Ruby For Awesome Power</h1>
+
+<p><img src="/image/soviet-duck.png" alt="In Soviet Russia, Duck Types You!" title="In Soviet Russia, Duck Types You!">
+</p>
-<p><img src="/image/soviet-duck.png" title="In Soviet Russia, Duck Types You!" alt="In Soviet Russia, Duck Types You!"></p>
</article>
<footer>
<p>Copyright 2011 <a href="mailto:kurtisrainboltgreene@gmail.com">Kurtis Rainbolt-Greene</a></p>
View
2 output/style.css
@@ -1 +1 @@
-html,body,div,span,object,iframe,hr,h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6,p,blockquote,pre,abbr,address,cite,code,del,dfn,em,img,ins,kbd,q,samp,small,strong,sub,sup,var,b,i,dl,dt,dd,ol,ul,li,fieldset,form,label,button,label,legend,input,textarea,table,caption,tbody,tfoot,thead,tr,th,td,article,aside,figure,footer,header,hgroup,menu,nav,section,menu,time,mark,audio,video{margin:0;padding:0;border:0 none;outline:0;outline-offset:0;font-size:inherit;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;background:transparent;color:inherit}article,aside,figure,footer,header,hgroup,nav,section,hr{display:block}body{line-height:1}ol,ul,nav{list-style:none}blockquote,q{quotes:none}blockquote:before,blockquote:after,q:before,q:after{content:"";content:none}del{text-decoration:line-through}ins,mark{background-color:#ffff99;color:black}ins{text-decoration:none}mark{font-style:italic;font-weight:bold}table{border-collapse:collapse;border-spacing:0}hr{height:1px;border-top:1px solid #cccccc;margin:1em 0}abbr[title],dfn[title]{border-bottom:1px dotted black;cursor:help}input,select{vertical-align:middle}:focus{outline:0}html{overflow-y:scroll}body{width:100%;background:white;color:black;font-family:"Helvetica", Helvetica, Myriad, Optima, Futura, Trebuchet, "Droid Sans", Tahoma, sans-serif;font-size:10px;-webkit-font-smoothing:antialiased;text-rendering:optimizeLegibility}h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;text-rendering:optimizeLegibility}h1,h2,h6{font-family:"Nobile", Helvetica, Myriad, Optima, Futura, Trebuchet, "Droid Sans", Tahoma, sans-serif;font-weight:bold}h3,h4,h5{font-weight:normal}h1{font-size:60px}h2{font-size:50px}h3{font-size:40px}h4{font-size:30px}h5{font-size:20px}h6{font-size:15px}p,ol,ul,pre{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;line-height:1.75}blockquote{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;padding-left:4.5em}blockquote p{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;font-family:"Merriweather", Georgia, Garamond, Palatino, Trajan, Baskerville, "Droid Serif", "Groudy old Style", serif;font-size:1.2em;font-style:italic}blockquote p cite{font-size:0.75em;text-decoration:underline}p{font-family:"Georgia", Georgia, Garamond, Palatino, Trajan, Baskerville, "Droid Serif", "Groudy old Style", serif;font-size:16px;text-align:left}pre,code{white-space:pre;white-space:pre-wrap;white-space:pre-line;word-wrap:break-word;font-family:"Inconsolata", Inconsolata, "Anonymous Pro", "Droid Sans Mono", monospace}ul,ol{font-size:16px}ul li,ol li{margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;margin-left:1.75em;margin-right:1.75em}ul ul,ul ol,ol ul,ol ol{margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;margin-left:1.75em;margin-right:1.75em}ul{list-style:disc inside}ol{list-style:decimal inside}hr{height:0.25px;display:block;margin-left:auto;margin-right:auto;border:1px dotted rgba(25, 25, 25, 0.75)}a{color:#990100;text-decoration:none}a:hover{color:#350000;boder-bottom:1px dotted}a:active{color:#607890;outline:none}a:focus{outline:thin dotted}a:link{-webkit-tap-highlight-color:#ff5e99}sub,sup{font-size:10px}sub{vertical-align:sub}sup{vertical-align:super}form label{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;font-family:"Helvetica", Helvetica, Myriad, Optima, Futura, Trebuchet, "Droid Sans", Tahoma, sans-serif;font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;line-height:1.75}form select{font-family:"Helvetica", Helvetica, Myriad, Optima, Futura, Trebuchet, "Droid Sans", Tahoma, sans-serif;color:#0f0f0f;font-size:18px}form input,form textarea{border:1px solid #0f0f0f;width:auto;margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;font-family:"Helvetica", Helvetica, Myriad, Optima, Futura, Trebuchet, "Droid Sans", Tahoma, sans-serif;color:#0f0f0f;font-size:14px}form input[type=text],form input[type=email],form input[type=password],form textarea[type=text],form textarea[type=email],form textarea[type=password]{background:#f0f0f0}form textarea{height:25px;background:#f0f0f0}
+html,body,div,span,object,iframe,hr,h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6,p,blockquote,pre,abbr,address,cite,code,del,dfn,em,img,ins,kbd,q,samp,small,strong,sub,sup,var,b,i,dl,dt,dd,ol,ul,li,fieldset,form,label,button,label,legend,input,textarea,table,caption,tbody,tfoot,thead,tr,th,td,article,aside,figure,footer,header,hgroup,menu,nav,section,menu,time,mark,audio,video{margin:0;padding:0;border:0 none;outline:0;outline-offset:0;font-size:inherit;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;background:transparent;color:inherit}article,aside,figure,footer,header,hgroup,nav,section,hr{display:block}body{line-height:1}ol,ul,nav{list-style:none}blockquote,q{quotes:none}blockquote:before,blockquote:after,q:before,q:after{content:"";content:none}del{text-decoration:line-through}ins,mark{background-color:#ffff99;color:black}ins{text-decoration:none}mark{font-style:italic;font-weight:bold}table{border-collapse:collapse;border-spacing:0}hr{height:1px;border-top:1px solid #cccccc;margin:1em 0}abbr[title],dfn[title]{border-bottom:1px dotted black;cursor:help}input,select{vertical-align:middle}:focus{outline:0}html{overflow-y:scroll}body{width:100%;background:white;color:black;font-family:"Helvetica", Helvetica, Myriad, Optima, Futura, Trebuchet, "Droid Sans", Tahoma, sans-serif;font-size:10px;-webkit-font-smoothing:antialiased;text-rendering:optimizeLegibility}h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;text-rendering:optimizeLegibility}h1,h2,h6{font-family:"Nobile", Helvetica, Myriad, Optima, Futura, Trebuchet, "Droid Sans", Tahoma, sans-serif;font-weight:bold}h3,h4,h5{font-weight:normal}h1{font-size:60px}h2{font-size:50px}h3{font-size:40px}h4{font-size:30px}h5{font-size:20px}h6{font-size:15px}p,ol,ul,pre{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;line-height:1.75}blockquote{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;padding-left:4.5em}blockquote p{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;font-family:"Merriweather", Georgia, Garamond, Palatino, Trajan, Baskerville, "Droid Serif", "Groudy old Style", serif;font-size:1.2em;font-style:italic}blockquote p cite{font-size:0.75em;text-decoration:underline}p{font-family:"Georgia", Georgia, Garamond, Palatino, Trajan, Baskerville, "Droid Serif", "Groudy old Style", serif;font-size:16px;text-align:left}pre,code{white-space:pre;white-space:pre-wrap;white-space:pre-line;word-wrap:break-word;font-family:"Inconsolata", Inconsolata, "Anonymous Pro", "Droid Sans Mono", monospace}ul,ol{font-size:16px}ul li,ol li{margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;margin-left:1.75em;margin-right:1.75em}ul ul,ul ol,ol ul,ol ol{margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;margin-left:1.75em;margin-right:1.75em}ul{list-style:disc inside}ol{list-style:decimal inside}hr{height:0.25px;display:block;margin-left:auto;margin-right:auto;border:1px dotted rgba(25, 25, 25, 0.75)}a{color:#990100;text-decoration:none}a:hover{color:#350000;boder-bottom:1px dotted}a:active{color:#607890;outline:none}a:focus{outline:thin dotted}a:link{-webkit-tap-highlight-color:#ff5e99}sub,sup{font-size:10px}sub{vertical-align:sub}sup{vertical-align:super}form label{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;font-family:"Helvetica", Helvetica, Myriad, Optima, Futura, Trebuchet, "Droid Sans", Tahoma, sans-serif;font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;line-height:1.75}form select{font-family:"Helvetica", Helvetica, Myriad, Optima, Futura, Trebuchet, "Droid Sans", Tahoma, sans-serif;color:#0f0f0f;font-size:18px}form input,form textarea{border:1px solid #0f0f0f;width:auto;margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;font-family:"Helvetica", Helvetica, Myriad, Optima, Futura, Trebuchet, "Droid Sans", Tahoma, sans-serif;color:#0f0f0f;font-size:14px}form input[type=text],form input[type=email],form input[type=password],form textarea[type=text],form textarea[type=email],form textarea[type=password]{background:#f0f0f0}form textarea{height:25px;background:#f0f0f0}pre{width:400px;margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;display:block;margin-left:auto;margin-right:auto;-moz-border-radius-topleft:3px 3px;-webkit-border-top-left-radius:3px 3px;-o-border-top-left-radius:3px 3px;border-top-left-radius:3px 3px;-moz-border-radius-topright:3px 3px;-webkit-border-top-right-radius:3px 3px;-o-border-top-right-radius:3px 3px;border-top-right-radius:3px 3px;-moz-border-radius-bottomleft:3px 3px;-webkit-border-bottom-left-radius:3px 3px;-o-border-bottom-left-radius:3px 3px;border-bottom-left-radius:3px 3px;-moz-border-radius-bottomright:3px 3px;-webkit-border-bottom-right-radius:3px 3px;-o-border-bottom-right-radius:3px 3px;border-bottom-right-radius:3px 3px;-moz-box-shadow:1px 1px 2px 1px rgba(10, 10, 10, 0.45) inset;-webkit-box-shadow:1px 1px 2px 1px rgba(10, 10, 10, 0.45) inset;-o-box-shadow:1px 1px 2px 1px rgba(10, 10, 10, 0.45) inset;box-shadow:1px 1px 2px 1px rgba(10, 10, 10, 0.45) inset;background:#aaa}pre code.language-ruby{margin-left:5px;margin-right:5px;margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;padding-left:5px;padding-right:5px;padding-top:5px;padding-bottom:5px;margin-top:-15px;display:block;margin-left:auto;margin-right:auto;font-size:14px}pre code.language-ruby .i{color:#b90504}

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