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CSI Cinder driver

Kubernetes

Compatibility

CSI version CSI Sidecar Version Cinder CSI Plugin Version Kubernetes Version
v1.0.x v1.0.x v1.0.0 docker image: k8scloudprovider/cinder-csi-plugin:latest v1.13+
v0.3.0 v0.3.x, v0.4.x v0.3.0 docker image: k8scloudprovider/cinder-csi-plugin:1.13.x v1.11, v1.12, v1.13
v0.2.0 v0.2.x v0.2.0 docker image: k8scloudprovider/cinder-csi-plugin:0.2.0 v1.10, v1.9
v0.1.0 v0.1.0 v0.1.0 docker image: k8scloudprovider/cinder-csi-plugin:0.1.0 v1.9

Requirements

RUNTIME_CONFIG="storage.k8s.io/v1=true"

MountPropagation requires support for privileged containers. So, make sure privileged containers are enabled in the cluster.

Check kubernetes CSI Docs for flag details and latest update.

NOTE: All following examples need to be used inside instance(s) provisoned by openstack, otherwise the attach action will fail due to fail to find instance ID from given openstack cloud.

Example local-up-cluster.sh

ALLOW_PRIVILEGED=true RUNTIME_CONFIG="storage.k8s.io/v1=true" LOG_LEVEL=5 hack/local-up-cluster.sh

Deploy

If you already created the cloud-config secret used by the cloud-controller-manager, remove the file manifests/cinder-csi-plugin/csi-secret-cinderplugin.yaml and then jump directly to the kubectl apply ... command.

Encode your $CLOUD_CONFIG file content using base64.

base64 -w 0 $CLOUD_CONFIG

Update cloud.conf configuration in manifests/cinder-csi-plugin/csi-secret-cinderplugin.yaml file by using the result of the above command.

kubectl -f manifests/cinder-csi-plugin apply

This creates a set of cluster roles, cluster role bindings, and statefulsets etc to communicate with openstack(cinder). For detailed list of created objects, explore the yaml files in the directory. You should make sure following similar pods are ready before proceed:

NAME                                READY   STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
csi-cinder-controllerplugin         4/4     Running   0          29h
csi-cinder-nodeplugin               2/2     Running   0          46h

you can get information about CSI Drivers running in a cluster, using CSIDriver object

$ kubectl get csidrivers.storage.k8s.io
NAME                       CREATED AT
cinder.csi.openstack.org   2019-07-29T09:02:40Z

$ kubectl describe csidrivers.storage.k8s.io
Name:         cinder.csi.openstack.org
Namespace:    
Labels:       <none>
Annotations:  <none>
API Version:  storage.k8s.io/v1beta1
Kind:         CSIDriver
Metadata:
  Creation Timestamp:  2019-07-29T09:02:40Z
  Resource Version:    1891
  Self Link:           /apis/storage.k8s.io/v1beta1/csidrivers/cinder.csi.openstack.org
  UID:                 2bd1f3bf-3c41-46a8-b99b-5773cb5eacd3
Spec:
  Attach Required:    true
  Pod Info On Mount:  false
Events:               <none>

Example Nginx application usage

After performing above steps, you can try to create StorageClass, PersistentVolumeClaim and pod to consume it. Try following command:

kubectl -f examples/cinder-csi-plugin/nginx.yaml create

You will get pvc which claims one volume from cinder

$ kubectl get pvc
NAME                   STATUS   VOLUME                                     CAPACITY   ACCESS MODES   STORAGECLASS          AGE
csi-pvc-cinderplugin   Bound    pvc-72a8f9c9-f462-11e8-b6b6-fa163e18b7b5   1Gi        RWO            csi-sc-cinderplugin   58m

$ openstack volume list
+--------------------------------------+--------+------------------------------------------+------+-------------+----------+--------------------------------------+
|                  ID                  | Status |                   Name                   | Size | Volume Type | Bootable |             Attached to              |
+--------------------------------------+--------+------------------------------------------+------+-------------+----------+--------------------------------------+
| b2e7be02-cdd7-487f-8eb9-6f10f3df790b | in-use | pvc-72a8f9c9-f462-11e8-b6b6-fa163e18b7b5 |  1   | lvmdriver-1 |  false   | 39859899-2985-43cf-8cdf-21de2548dfd9 |
+--------------------------------------+--------+------------------------------------------+------+-------------+----------+--------------------------------------+

Check the volume created and attached to the pod

$ ls /dev/vdb
/dev/vdb

$ mount | grep vdb
/dev/vdb on /var/lib/kubelet/pods/8196212e-f462-11e8-b6b6-fa163e18b7b5/volumes/kubernetes.io~csi/pvc-72a8f9c9-f462-11e8-b6b6-fa163e18b7b5/mount type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)

$ fdisk -l /dev/vdb | grep Disk
Disk /dev/vdb: 1 GiB, 1073741824 bytes, 2097152 sectors

Then try to add a file in the pod's mounted position (in our case, /var/lib/www/html)

$ kubectl exec -it nginx bash

root@nginx:/# ls /var/lib/www/html
lost+found

root@nginx:/# touch /var/lib/www/html/index.html

root@nginx:/# exit
exit

Next, make sure the pod is deleted so that the persistent volume will be freed

kubectl delete pod nginx

Then the volume is back to available state:

$ ls /dev/vdb
ls: cannot access '/dev/vdb': No such file or directory

$ openstack volume list
+--------------------------------------+-----------+------------------------------------------+------+-------------+----------+-------------+
|                  ID                  |   Status  |                   Name                   | Size | Volume Type | Bootable | Attached to |
+--------------------------------------+-----------+------------------------------------------+------+-------------+----------+-------------+
| b2e7be02-cdd7-487f-8eb9-6f10f3df790b | available | pvc-72a8f9c9-f462-11e8-b6b6-fa163e18b7b5 |  1   | lvmdriver-1 |  false   |             |
+--------------------------------------+-----------+------------------------------------------+------+-------------+----------+-------------+

Optionally you can verify the volume does contain the info we created in pod by attaching to a VM in openstack:

$ nova volume-attach ji1 b2e7be02-cdd7-487f-8eb9-6f10f3df790b
+----------+--------------------------------------+
| Property | Value                                |
+----------+--------------------------------------+
| device   | /dev/vdb                             |
| id       | b2e7be02-cdd7-487f-8eb9-6f10f3df790b |
| serverId | 39859899-2985-43cf-8cdf-21de2548dfd9 |
| volumeId | b2e7be02-cdd7-487f-8eb9-6f10f3df790b |
+----------+--------------------------------------+

$ ls /dev/vdb
/dev/vdb
$ mount /dev/vdb /mnt; ls /mnt
index.html  lost+found

Enable Topology-aware dynamic provisioning for Cinder Volumes

Following feature gates needs to be enabled as below:

  1. --feature-gates=CSINodeInfo=true,CSIDriverRegistry=true in the manifest entries of kubelet and kube-apiserver. (Enabled by default in kubernetes v1.14)
  2. --feature-gates=Topology=true needs to be enabled in external-provisioner.

Currently, driver supports only one topology key: topology.cinder.csi.openstack.org/zone that represents availability by zone.

Note: allowedTopologies can be specified in storage class to restrict the topology of provisioned volumes to specific zones and should be used as replacement of availability parameter.

Example Snapshot Create and Restore

Following prerequisite needed for volume snapshot feature to work.

  1. Enable --feature-gates=VolumeSnapshotDataSource=true in kube-apiserver
  2. Make sure, your csi deployment contains external-snapshotter sidecar container, external-snapshotter sidecar container will create three crd's for snapshot management VolumeSnapshot,VolumeSnapshotContent, and VolumeSnapshotClass. external-snapshotter is a part of csi-cinder-controllerplugin

For Snapshot Creation and Volume Restore, please follow below steps:

  • Create Storage Class, Snapshot Class and PVC
$ kubectl -f examples/cinder-csi-plugin/snapshot/example.yaml create
  • Verify that pvc is bounded
$ kubectl describe pvc <pvc-name>
  • Create Snapshot of the PVC
$ kubectl -f examples/cinder-csi-plugin/snapshot/snapshotcreate.yaml create
  • Verify that snapshot is created
$ kubectl get volumesnapshot 
$ kubectl get volumesnapshotcontent
  • Restore volume from snapshot
$ kubectl -f examples/cinder-csi-plugin/snapshot/snapshotrestore.yaml create
  • Verify that volume from snapshot is created
$ kubectl get pv

Example: Raw Block Volume

For consuming a cinder volume as a raw block device

  1. Make sure the volumeMode is Block in Persistence Volume Claim Spec
  2. Make sure the pod is consuming the PVC with the defined name and volumeDevices is used instead of volumeMounts
  3. Deploy the Application

Example :

$ kubectl create -f examples/cinder-csi-plugin/block/block.yaml

Make sure Pod is running

$ kubectl get pods

Verify the device node is mounted inside the container

$ kubectl exec -ti test-block -- ls -al /dev/xvda
brw-rw----    1 root     disk      202, 23296 Mar 12 04:23 /dev/xvda

Volume Expansion

  1. As Volume Expansion is an alpha feature. Make sure you have enabled it in Kubernetes API server using --feature-gates=ExpandCSIVolumes=true flag.
  2. Make sure to set allowVolumeExpansion to true in Storage class spec.
  3. Deploy the application.

Example:

$ kubectl create -f examples/cinder-csi-plugin/resize/example.yaml

Verify PV is created and bound to PVC

$ kubectl get pvc
NAME                     STATUS    VOLUME                                     CAPACITY  ACCESS MODES   STORAGECLASS   AGE
csi-pvc-cinderplugin     Bound     pvc-e36abf50-84f3-11e8-8538-42010a800002   1Gi       RWO            csi-sc-cinderplugin     9s

Make sure Pod is running

$ kubectl get pods
NAME                 READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
nginx                1/1       Running   0          1m

Check current filesystem size on the running pod

$ kubectl exec nginx -- df -h /var/lib/www/html
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/vdb        1.0G   24M  0.98G   1% /var/lib/www/html

Resize volume by modifying the field spec -> resources -> requests -> storage

$ kubectl edit pvc csi-pvc-cinderplugin
apiVersion: v1
kind: PersistentVolumeClaim
...
spec:
  resources:
    requests:
      storage: 2Gi
  ...
...

Verify filesystem resized on the running pod

$ kubectl exec nginx -- df -h /var/lib/www/html
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/vdb        2.0G   27M  1.97G   1% /var/lib/www/html

Running Sanity Tests

Sanity tests create a real instance of driver and fake cloud provider. see Sanity check for more info.

$ make test-cinder-csi-sanity

Using CSC tool

Test using csc

Get csc tool from https://github.com/thecodeteam/gocsi/tree/master/csc

Start Cinder driver

First, you need to start the plugin as daemon to accept request from csc. Following example is starting listening at localhost port 10000 with cloud configuration given in /etc/cloud.conf and the node id is CSINodeID. ClusterID is the identifier of the cluster in which the plugin is running.

$ sudo cinder-csi-plugin --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000 --cloud-config /etc/cloud.conf --nodeid CSINodeID --cluster ClusterID

Get plugin info

$ csc identity plugin-info --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000
"cinder.csi.openstack.org"      "1.0.0"

Get supported capabilities

$ csc identity plugin-capabilities --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000
CONTROLLER_SERVICE
VOLUME_ACCESSIBILITY_CONSTRAINTS

Get controller implemented capabilities

$ csc controller get-capabilities  --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000
&{type:LIST_VOLUMES }
&{type:CREATE_DELETE_VOLUME }
&{type:PUBLISH_UNPUBLISH_VOLUME }
&{type:CREATE_DELETE_SNAPSHOT }
&{type:LIST_SNAPSHOTS }

Create a volume

Following sample creates a volume named CSIVolumeName and the volume id returned is 8a55f98f-e987-43ab-a9f5-973352bee19c with size 1073741824 bytes (1Gb)

$ csc controller create-volume --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000 CSIVolumeName
"8a55f98f-e987-43ab-a9f5-973352bee19c"  1073741824      "availability"="nova"

List volumes

Following sample list all volumes:

$ csc controller list-volumes --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000
"8a55f98f-e987-43ab-a9f5-973352bee19c"  1073741824

Delete a volume

Following sample deletes a volume 01217e93-bd1b-4760-b5d8-18b8b3d47f91

$ csc controller delete-volume --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000 01217e93-bd1b-4760-b5d8-18b8b3d47f91
01217e93-bd1b-4760-b5d8-18b8b3d47f91

Create a snapshot from volume

Following sample creates a snapshot from volume 40615da4-3fda-4e78-bf58-820692536e68. After execution, snapshot e2df8c2a-58eb-40fb-8ec9-45aee5b8f39f will be created.

$ csc controller create-snapshot --source-volume 40615da4-3fda-4e78-bf58-820692536e68 --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000 s1
"e2df8c2a-58eb-40fb-8ec9-45aee5b8f39f"  1073741824      40615da4-3fda-4e78-bf58-820692536e68    seconds:1561530261      true

Use openstack command to verify:

openstack volume snapshot list
+--------------------------------------+------+-------------+-----------+------+
| ID                                   | Name | Description | Status    | Size |
+--------------------------------------+------+-------------+-----------+------+
| e2df8c2a-58eb-40fb-8ec9-45aee5b8f39f | s1   | None        | available |    1 |
+--------------------------------------+------+-------------+-----------+------+

List snapshots

Following sample lists all snapshots:

$ csc controller  list-snapshots --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000
"e2df8c2a-58eb-40fb-8ec9-45aee5b8f39f" 1073741824      40615da4-3fda-4e78-bf58-820692536e68    seconds:1561532425      true

Delete a snapshot

Following sample deletes the snapshot e2df8c2a-58eb-40fb-8ec9-45aee5b8f39f.

$ csc controller delete-snapshot e2df8c2a-58eb-40fb-8ec9-45aee5b8f39f --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000
e2df8c2a-58eb-40fb-8ec9-45aee5b8f39f

Use openstack command to verify:

$ openstack volume snapshot list

$

ControllerPublish a volume

The action has similar result to nova volume-attach command:

Assume we have following result in openstack now:

$ openstack server list
+--------------------------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------------+--------+---------+
| ID                                   | Name  | Status | Networks                       | Image  | Flavor  |
+--------------------------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------------+--------+---------+
| 17e540e6-8d08-4a5a-8835-668bc8fe913c | demo1 | ACTIVE | demo-net=10.0.0.13             | cirros | m1.tiny |
+--------------------------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------------+--------+---------+

$ openstack volume list
+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+-----------+------+-------------+
| ID                                   | Name                              | Status    | Size | Attached to |
+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+-----------+------+-------------+
| ed893ce1-807d-4c6e-a558-88c61b439659 | v1                                | available |    1 |             |
+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+-----------+------+-------------+

Then execute:

# csc controller publish --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000 --node-id=17e540e6-8d08-4a5a-8835-668bc8fe913c ed893ce1-807d-4c6e-a558-88c61b439659
"ed893ce1-807d-4c6e-a558-88c61b439659"  "DevicePath"="/dev/vdb"

From openstack side you will see following result:

$ openstack server list
+--------------------------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------------+--------+---------+
| ID                                   | Name  | Status | Networks                       | Image  | Flavor  |
+--------------------------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------------+--------+---------+
| 17e540e6-8d08-4a5a-8835-668bc8fe913c | demo1 | ACTIVE | demo-net=10.0.0.13             | cirros | m1.tiny |
+--------------------------------------+-------+--------+--------------------------------+--------+---------+
$ openstack volume list
+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+-----------+------+--------------------------------+
| ID                                   | Name                              | Status    | Size | Attached to                    |
+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+-----------+------+--------------------------------+
| ed893ce1-807d-4c6e-a558-88c61b439659 | v1                                | in-use    |    1 | Attached to demo1 on /dev/vdb  |
+--------------------------------------+-----------------------------------+-----------+------+--------------------------------+

Note:
volume "Status" field will change to "in-use" afterwards.
"Attached to" field will change to volume mount point.

ControllerUnpublish a volume

ControllerUnpublish is reserver action of ControllerPublish, which is similar to nova volume-detach

[root@kvm-017212 docs]# csc controller unpublish --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000 --node-id=17e540e6-8d08-4a5a-8835-668bc8fe913c ed893ce1-807d-4c6e-a558-88c61b439659

ed893ce1-807d-4c6e-a558-88c61b439659

NodePublish a volume

$ csc node publish --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000 --target-path /mnt/cinder --pub-info DevicePath="/dev/xxx" CSIVolumeID
CSIVolumeID

NodeUnpublish a volume

$ csc node unpublish --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000 --target-path /mnt/cinder CSIVolumeID
CSIVolumeID

Get NodeID

$ csc node get-id --endpoint tcp://127.0.0.1:10000
CSINodeID
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