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Remove distracting, superfluous links from Learn Kubernetes Basics (#…

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chenopis authored and k8s-ci-robot committed Dec 7, 2018
1 parent 838ba5c commit 2fc30aab67e1fc926b3aed4e7cd0c3fba812f59e
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<h2>Kubernetes Basics</h2>
<p>This tutorial provides a walkthrough of the basics of the Kubernetes cluster orchestration system. Each module contains some background information on major Kubernetes features and concepts, and includes an interactive online tutorial. These interactive tutorials let you manage a simple cluster and its <a href="/docs/concepts/overview/what-is-kubernetes/#why-containers">containerized applications</a> for yourself.</p>
<p>This tutorial provides a walkthrough of the basics of the Kubernetes cluster orchestration system. Each module contains some background information on major Kubernetes features and concepts, and includes an interactive online tutorial. These interactive tutorials let you manage a simple cluster and its containerized applications for yourself.</p>
<p>Using the interactive tutorials, you can learn to:</p>
<ul>
<li>Deploy a containerized application on a cluster</li>
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ <h2>Kubernetes Basics</h2>
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<h2>What can Kubernetes do for you?</h2>
<p>With modern web services, users expect applications to be available 24/7, and developers expect to deploy new versions of those applications several times a day. Containerization helps package software to serve these goals, enabling applications to be released and updated in an easy and fast way without downtime. Kubernetes helps you make sure those containerized applications run where and when you want, and helps them find the resources and tools they need to work. <a href="/docs/concepts/overview/what-is-kubernetes/">Kubernetes</a> is a production-ready, open source platform designed with Google's accumulated experience in container orchestration, combined with best-of-breed ideas from the community.</p>
<p>With modern web services, users expect applications to be available 24/7, and developers expect to deploy new versions of those applications several times a day. Containerization helps package software to serve these goals, enabling applications to be released and updated in an easy and fast way without downtime. Kubernetes helps you make sure those containerized applications run where and when you want, and helps them find the resources and tools they need to work. Kubernetes is a production-ready, open source platform designed with Google's accumulated experience in container orchestration, combined with best-of-breed ideas from the community.</p>
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@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ <h3>Objectives</h3>
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<h3>Kubernetes Clusters</h3>
<p>
<b>Kubernetes coordinates a highly available cluster of computers that are connected to work as a single unit.</b> The abstractions in Kubernetes allow you to deploy containerized applications to a cluster without tying them specifically to individual machines. To make use of this new model of deployment, applications need to be packaged in a way that decouples them from individual hosts: they need to be containerized. Containerized applications are more flexible and available than in past deployment models, where applications were installed directly onto specific machines as packages deeply integrated into the host. <b>Kubernetes automates the distribution and scheduling of application containers across a cluster in a more efficient way.</b> Kubernetes is an <a href="https://github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes">open-source</a> platform and is production-ready.
<b>Kubernetes coordinates a highly available cluster of computers that are connected to work as a single unit.</b> The abstractions in Kubernetes allow you to deploy containerized applications to a cluster without tying them specifically to individual machines. To make use of this new model of deployment, applications need to be packaged in a way that decouples them from individual hosts: they need to be containerized. Containerized applications are more flexible and available than in past deployment models, where applications were installed directly onto specific machines as packages deeply integrated into the host. <b>Kubernetes automates the distribution and scheduling of application containers across a cluster in a more efficient way.</b> Kubernetes is an open-source platform and is production-ready.
</p>
<p>A Kubernetes cluster consists of two types of resources:
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<p><b>The Master is responsible for managing the cluster.</b> The master coordinates all activities in your cluster, such as scheduling applications, maintaining applications' desired state, scaling applications, and rolling out new updates.</p>
<p><b>A node is a VM or a physical computer that serves as a worker machine in a Kubernetes cluster.</b> Each node has a Kubelet, which is an agent for managing the node and communicating with the Kubernetes master. The node should also have tools for handling container operations, such as <a href="https://www.docker.com/">Docker</a> or <a href="https://coreos.com/rkt/">rkt</a>. A Kubernetes cluster that handles production traffic should have a minimum of three nodes.</p>
<p><b>A node is a VM or a physical computer that serves as a worker machine in a Kubernetes cluster.</b> Each node has a Kubelet, which is an agent for managing the node and communicating with the Kubernetes master. The node should also have tools for handling container operations, such as Docker or rkt. A Kubernetes cluster that handles production traffic should have a minimum of three nodes.</p>

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<p><i> Masters manage the cluster and the nodes are used to host the running applications. </i></p>
<p><i>Masters manage the cluster and the nodes are used to host the running applications.</i></p>
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<p>When you deploy applications on Kubernetes, you tell the master to start the application containers. The master schedules the containers to run on the cluster's nodes. <b>The nodes communicate with the master using the Kubernetes API</b>, which the master exposes. End users can also use the Kubernetes API directly to interact with the cluster.</p>

<p>A Kubernetes cluster can be deployed on either physical or virtual machines. To get started with Kubernetes development, you can use <a href="https://github.com/kubernetes/minikube">Minikube</a>. Minikube is a lightweight Kubernetes implementation that creates a VM on your local machine and deploys a simple cluster containing only one node. Minikube is available for Linux, macOS, and Windows systems. The Minikube CLI provides basic bootstrapping operations for working with your cluster, including start, stop, status, and delete. For this tutorial, however, you'll use a provided online terminal with Minikube pre-installed.</p>
<p>A Kubernetes cluster can be deployed on either physical or virtual machines. To get started with Kubernetes development, you can use Minikube. Minikube is a lightweight Kubernetes implementation that creates a VM on your local machine and deploys a simple cluster containing only one node. Minikube is available for Linux, macOS, and Windows systems. The Minikube CLI provides basic bootstrapping operations for working with your cluster, including start, stop, status, and delete. For this tutorial, however, you'll use a provided online terminal with Minikube pre-installed.</p>

<p>Now that you know what Kubernetes is, let's go to the online tutorial and start our first cluster!</p>

@@ -91,9 +91,9 @@ <h2 style="color: #3771e3;">Deploying your first app on Kubernetes</h2>
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<p>For our first Deployment, we'll use a <a href="https://nodejs.org">Node.js</a> application packaged in a Docker container.
<p>For our first Deployment, we'll use a Node.js application packaged in a Docker container.
To create the Node.js application and deploy the Docker container, follow the instructions from the
<a href="/docs/tutorials/hello-minikube/#create-your-node-js-application">Hello Minikube tutorial</a>.</p>
<a href="/docs/tutorials/hello-minikube/">Hello Minikube tutorial</a>.</p>

<p>Now that you know what Deployments are, let's go to the online tutorial and deploy our first app!</p>

@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ <h3>Objectives</h3>
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<h3>Overview of Kubernetes Services</h3>

<p>Kubernetes <a href="/docs/concepts/workloads/pods/pod-overview/">Pods</a> are mortal. Pods in fact have a <a href="/docs/concepts/workloads/pods/pod-lifecycle/">lifecycle</a>. When a worker node dies, the Pods running on the Node are also lost. A <a href="/docs/user-guide/replication-controller/#what-is-a-replicationcontroller">ReplicationController</a> might then dynamically drive the cluster back to desired state via creation of new Pods to keep your application running. As another example, consider an image-processing backend with 3 replicas. Those replicas are exchangeable; the front-end system should not care about backend replicas or even if a Pod is lost and recreated. That said, each Pod in a Kubernetes cluster has a unique IP address, even Pods on the same Node, so there needs to be a way of automatically reconciling changes among Pods so that your applications continue to function.</p>
<p>Kubernetes <a href="/docs/concepts/workloads/pods/pod-overview/">Pods</a> are mortal. Pods in fact have a <a href="/docs/concepts/workloads/pods/pod-lifecycle/">lifecycle</a>. When a worker node dies, the Pods running on the Node are also lost. A <a href="/docs/concepts/workloads/controllers/replicaset/">ReplicaSet</a> might then dynamically drive the cluster back to desired state via creation of new Pods to keep your application running. As another example, consider an image-processing backend with 3 replicas. Those replicas are exchangeable; the front-end system should not care about backend replicas or even if a Pod is lost and recreated. That said, each Pod in a Kubernetes cluster has a unique IP address, even Pods on the same Node, so there needs to be a way of automatically reconciling changes among Pods so that your applications continue to function.</p>

<p>A Service in Kubernetes is an abstraction which defines a logical set of Pods and a policy by which to access them. Services enable a loose coupling between dependent Pods. A Service is defined using YAML <a href="/docs/concepts/configuration/overview/#general-config-tips">(preferred)</a> or JSON, like all Kubernetes objects. The set of Pods targeted by a Service is usually determined by a <i>LabelSelector</i> (see below for why you might want a Service without including <code>selector</code> in the spec).</p>

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