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fix a series punctuation errors

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SRaddict committed Dec 22, 2016
1 parent e43373e commit 383e40f978334792e7ca30399845c9bf38ea813c
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@@ -378,7 +378,7 @@ Section 8 -- Interpretation.
Creative Commons is not a party to its public
licenses. Notwithstanding, Creative Commons may elect to apply one of
its public licenses to material it publishes and in those instances
will be considered the Licensor. The text of the Creative Commons
will be considered the "Licensor." The text of the Creative Commons
public licenses is dedicated to the public domain under the CC0 Public
Domain Dedication. Except for the limited purpose of indicating that
material is shared under a Creative Commons public license or as
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@@ -17,13 +17,13 @@ <h5>A collection of users running Kubernetes in production.</h5>
<div class="case-studies">
<div class="case-study">
<img src="/images/case_studies/pearson.png" alt="Pearson">
<p class="quote">We chose Kubernetes because of its flexibility, ease of management and the way it improves our engineers’ productivity.</p>
<p class="quote">"We chose Kubernetes because of its flexibility, ease of management and the way it improves our engineers’ productivity."</p>
<!--<p class="attrib">— Chris Jackson, Director for Cloud Product Engineering, Pearson</p>-->
<a href="./pearson/">Read about Pearson</a>
</div>
<div class="case-study">
<img src="/images/case_studies/wikimedia.png" alt="Wikimedia">
<p class="quote">With Kubernetes, we’re simplifying our environment and making it easier for developers to build the tools that make wikis run better.</p>
<p class="quote">"With Kubernetes, we’re simplifying our environment and making it easier for developers to build the tools that make wikis run better."</p>
<!--<p class="attrib">— Yuvi Panda, Operations Engineer, Wikimedia Foundation</p>-->
<a href="./wikimedia/">Read about Wikimedia</a>
</div>
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@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ <h3 id="caseStudyTitle">Using Kubernetes to reinvent the world’s largest educa
<div class="feature">
<img src="/images/case_studies/pearson.png" alt="Pearson">
<p class="quote">
To transform our infrastructure, we had to think beyond simply enabling automated provisioning, we realized we had to build a platform that would allow Pearson developers to build manage and deploy applications in a completely different way. We chose Kubernetes because of its flexibility, ease of management and the way it would improve our engineers’ productivity. </p>
"To transform our infrastructure, we had to think beyond simply enabling automated provisioning, we realized we had to build a platform that would allow Pearson developers to build manage and deploy applications in a completely different way. We chose Kubernetes because of its flexibility, ease of management and the way it would improve our engineers’ productivity." </p>
<p class="attrib">— Chris Jackson, Director for Cloud Product Engineering, Pearson</p>
</div>
</div>
@@ -63,9 +63,9 @@ <h4>Results:</h4>
<main>
<div class="content">
<h4>Kubernetes powers a comprehensive developer experience</h4>
<p>Pearson wanted to use as much open source technology as possible for the platform given that it provides both technical and commercial benefits over the duration of the project. Jackson says, “Building an infrastructure platform based on open source technology in Pearson was a no-brainer, the sharing of technical challenges and advanced use cases in a community of people with talent far beyond what we could hire independently allows us to innovate at a level we could not reach on our own. Our engineers enjoy returning code to the community and participating in talks, blogs and meetings, it’s a great way for us to allow our team to express themselves and share the pride they have in their work.”</p>
<p>It also wanted to use a container-focused platform. Pearson has 400 development groups and diverse brands with varying business and technical needs. With containers, each brand could experiment with building new types of content using their preferred technologies, and then deliver it using containers. Pearson chose Kubernetes because it believes that is the best technology for managing containers, has the widest community support and offers the most flexible and powerful tools.</p>
<p>Kubernetes is at the core of the platform we’ve built for developers. After we get our big spike in back-to-school in traffic, much of Pearson’s traffic will interact with Kubernetes. It is proving to be as effective as we had hoped, Jackson says.</p>
<p>Pearson wanted to use as much open source technology as possible for the platform given that it provides both technical and commercial benefits over the duration of the project. Jackson says, "Building an infrastructure platform based on open source technology in Pearson was a no-brainer, the sharing of technical challenges and advanced use cases in a community of people with talent far beyond what we could hire independently allows us to innovate at a level we could not reach on our own. Our engineers enjoy returning code to the community and participating in talks, blogs and meetings, it’s a great way for us to allow our team to express themselves and share the pride they have in their work."</p>
<p>It also wanted to use a container-focused platform. Pearson has 400 development groups and diverse brands with varying business and technical needs. With containers, each brand could experiment with building new types of content using their preferred technologies, and then deliver it using containers. Pearson chose Kubernetes because it believes that is the best technology for managing containers, has the widest community support and offers the most flexible and powerful tools."</p>
<p>Kubernetes is at the core of the platform we’ve built for developers. After we get our big spike in back-to-school in traffic, much of Pearson’s traffic will interact with Kubernetes. It is proving to be as effective as we had hoped," Jackson says.</p>
</div>
</main>
</section>
@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ <h4>Kubernetes powers a comprehensive developer experience</h4>
<h4>Encouraging experimentation, saving engineers time</h4>
<p>With the new platform, Pearson will increase stability and performance, and to bring products to market more quickly. The company says its engineers will also get a productivity boost because they won’t spend time managing infrastructure. Jackson estimates 15 to 20 percent in productivity savings.</p>
<p>Beyond that, Pearson says the platform will encourage innovation because of the ease with which new applications can be developed, and because applications will be deployed far more quickly than in the past. It expects that will help the company meet its goal of reaching 200 million learners within the next 10 years.</p>
<p>We’re already seeing tremendous benefits with Kubernetes — improved engineering productivity, faster delivery of applications and a simplified infrastructure. But this is just the beginning. Kubernetes will help transform the way that educational content is delivered online, says Jackson.</p>
<p>"We’re already seeing tremendous benefits with Kubernetes — improved engineering productivity, faster delivery of applications and a simplified infrastructure. But this is just the beginning. Kubernetes will help transform the way that educational content is delivered online," says Jackson.</p>
</div>
</main>
</section>
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ <h3 id="caseStudyTitle">Using Kubernetes to Build Tools to Improve the World's W
<div class="feature">
<img src="/images/case_studies/wikimedia.png" alt="Wikimedia">
<p class="quote">
Wikimedia Tool Labs is vital for making sure wikis all around the world work as well as they possibly can. Because it’s grown organically for almost 10 years, it has become an extremely challenging environment and difficult to maintain. It’s like a big ball of mud — you really can’t see through it. With Kubernetes, we’re simplifying the environment and making it easier for developers to build the tools that make wikis run better.
"Wikimedia Tool Labs is vital for making sure wikis all around the world work as well as they possibly can. Because it’s grown organically for almost 10 years, it has become an extremely challenging environment and difficult to maintain. It’s like a big ball of mud — you really can’t see through it. With Kubernetes, we’re simplifying the environment and making it easier for developers to build the tools that make wikis run better."
</p>
<p class="attrib">— Yuvi Panda, operations engineer at Wikimedia Foundation and Wikimedia Tool Labs</p>
</div>
@@ -67,13 +67,13 @@ <h4>Results:</h4>
<div class="content">
<h4>Using Kubernetes to provide tools for maintaining wikis</h4>
<p>
Wikimedia Tool Labs is run by a staff of four-and-a-half paid employees and two volunteers. The infrastructure didn't make it easy or intuitive for developers to build bots and other tools to make wikis work more easily. Yuvi says, It’s incredibly chaotic. We have lots of Perl and Bash duct tape on top of it. Everything is super fragile.
Wikimedia Tool Labs is run by a staff of four-and-a-half paid employees and two volunteers. The infrastructure didn't make it easy or intuitive for developers to build bots and other tools to make wikis work more easily. Yuvi says, "It’s incredibly chaotic. We have lots of Perl and Bash duct tape on top of it. Everything is super fragile."
</p>
<p>
To solve the problem, Wikimedia Tool Labs migrated parts of its infrastructure to Kubernetes, in preparation for eventually moving its entire system. Yuvi said Kubernetes greatly simplifies maintenance. The goal is to allow developers creating bots and other tools to use whatever development methods they want, but make it easier for the Wikimedia Tool Labs to maintain the required infrastructure for hosting and sharing them.
</p>
<p>
With Kubernetes, I’ve been able to remove a lot of our custom-made code, which makes everything easier to maintain. Our users’ code also runs in a more stable way than previously, says Yuvi.
"With Kubernetes, I’ve been able to remove a lot of our custom-made code, which makes everything easier to maintain. Our users’ code also runs in a more stable way than previously," says Yuvi.
</p>
</div>
</main>
@@ -90,7 +90,7 @@ <h4>Simplifying infrastructure and keeping wikis running better</h4>
In the future, with a more complete migration to Kubernetes, Wikimedia Tool Labs expects to make it even easier to host and maintain the bots and tools that help run wikis across the world. The tool labs already host approximately 1,300 tools and bots from 800 volunteers, with many more being submitted every day. Twenty percent of the tool labs’ web tools that account for more than 60 percent of web traffic now run on Kubernetes. The tool labs has a 25-node cluster that keeps up with each new Kubernetes release. Many existing web tools are migrating to Kubernetes.
</p>
<p>
Our goal is to make sure that people all over the world can share knowledge as easily as possible. Kubernetes helps with that, by making it easier for wikis everywhere to have the tools they need to thrive, says Yuvi.
"Our goal is to make sure that people all over the world can share knowledge as easily as possible. Kubernetes helps with that, by making it easier for wikis everywhere to have the tools they need to thrive," says Yuvi.
</p>
</div>
</main>
@@ -126,7 +126,7 @@ For additional HTTP configuration, refer to the [kubeconfig](/docs/user-guide/ku
When faced with an admission decision, the API Server POSTs a JSON serialized api.imagepolicy.v1alpha1.ImageReview object describing the action. This object contains fields describing the containers being admitted, as well as any pod annotations that match `*.image-policy.k8s.io/*`.
Note that webhook API objects are subject to the same versioning compatibility rules as other Kubernetes API objects. Implementers should be aware of looser compatibility promises for alpha objects and check the apiVersion field of the request to ensure correct deserialization. Additionally, the API Server must enable the imagepolicy.k8s.io/v1alpha1 API extensions group (`--runtime-config=imagepolicy.k8s.io/v1alpha1=true`).
Note that webhook API objects are subject to the same versioning compatibility rules as other Kubernetes API objects. Implementers should be aware of looser compatibility promises for alpha objects and check the "apiVersion" field of the request to ensure correct deserialization. Additionally, the API Server must enable the imagepolicy.k8s.io/v1alpha1 API extensions group (`--runtime-config=imagepolicy.k8s.io/v1alpha1=true`).
An example request body:
@@ -151,7 +151,7 @@ An example request body:
}
```
The remote service is expected to fill the ImageReviewStatus field of the request and respond to either allow or disallow access. The response body’s spec field is ignored and may be omitted. A permissive response would return:
The remote service is expected to fill the ImageReviewStatus field of the request and respond to either allow or disallow access. The response body’s "spec" field is ignored and may be omitted. A permissive response would return:
```
{
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ given the pods that are already running in the cluster
the rescheduler tries to free up space for the add-on by evicting some pods; then the scheduler will schedule the add-on pod.
To avoid situation when another pod is scheduled into the space prepared for the critical add-on,
the chosen node gets a temporary taint CriticalAddonsOnly before the eviction(s)
the chosen node gets a temporary taint "CriticalAddonsOnly" before the eviction(s)
(see [more details](https://github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes/blob/master/docs/design/taint-toleration-dedicated.md)).
Each critical add-on has to tolerate it,
the other pods shouldn't tolerate the taint. The tain is removed once the add-on is successfully scheduled.
@@ -18,15 +18,15 @@ In Kubernetes version 1.5, Windows Server Containers for Kubernetes is supported
Network is achieved using L3 routing. Because third-party networking plugins (e.g. flannel, calico, etc) don’t natively work on Windows Server, existing technology that is built into the Windows and Linux operating systems is relied on. In this L3 networking approach, a /16 subnet is chosen for the cluster nodes, and a /24 subnet is assigned to each worker node. All pods on a given worker node will be connected to the /24 subnet. This allows pods on the same node to communicate with each other. In order to enable networking between pods running on different nodes, routing features that are built into Windows Server 2016 and Linux are used.
### Linux
The above networking approach is already supported on Linux using a bridge interface, which essentially creates a private network local to the node. Similar to the Windows side, routes to all other pod CIDRs must be created in order to send packets via the public NIC.
The above networking approach is already supported on Linux using a bridge interface, which essentially creates a private network local to the node. Similar to the Windows side, routes to all other pod CIDRs must be created in order to send packets via the "public" NIC.
### Windows
Each Window Server node should have the following configuration:
1. Two NICs (virtual networking adapters) are required on each Windows Server node - The two Windows container networking modes of interest (transparent and L2 bridge) use an external Hyper-V virtual switch. This means that one of the NICs is entirely allocated to the bridge, creating the need for the second NIC.
2. Transparent container network created - This is a manual configuration step and is shown in **_Route Setup_** section below
3. RRAS (Routing) Windows feature enabled - Allows routing between NICs on the box, and also captures packets that have the destination IP of a POD running on the node. To enable, open Server Manager. Click on Roles”, “Add Roles. Click Next. Select Network Policy and Access Services. Click on Routing and Remote Access Service and the underlying checkboxes
4. Routes defined pointing to the other pod CIDRs via the public NIC - These routes are added to the built-in routing table as shown in **_Route Setup_** section below
3. RRAS (Routing) Windows feature enabled - Allows routing between NICs on the box, and also "captures" packets that have the destination IP of a POD running on the node. To enable, open "Server Manager". Click on "Roles", "Add Roles". Click "Next". Select "Network Policy and Access Services". Click on "Routing and Remote Access Service" and the underlying checkboxes
4. Routes defined pointing to the other pod CIDRs via the "public" NIC - These routes are added to the built-in routing table as shown in **_Route Setup_** section below
The following diagram illustrates the Windows Server networking setup for Kubernetes Setup
![Windows Setup](windows-setup.png)
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ <h2>Kubernetes Pods</h2>
<li>Networking, as a unique cluster IP address</li>
<li>Information about how to run each container, such as the container image version or specific ports to use</li>
</ul>
<p>A Pod models an application-specific logical host and can contain different application containers which are relatively tightly coupled. For example, a Pod might include both the container with your Node.js app as well as a different container that feeds the data to be published by the Node.js webserver. The containers in a Pod share an IP Address and port space, are always co-located and co-scheduled, and run in a shared context on the same Node.</p>
<p>A Pod models an application-specific "logical host" and can contain different application containers which are relatively tightly coupled. For example, a Pod might include both the container with your Node.js app as well as a different container that feeds the data to be published by the Node.js webserver. The containers in a Pod share an IP Address and port space, are always co-located and co-scheduled, and run in a shared context on the same Node.</p>
<p>Pods are the atomic unit on the Kubernetes platform. When we create a Deployment on Kubernetes, that Deployment creates Pods with containers inside them (as opposed to creating containers directly). Each Pod is tied to the Node where it is scheduled, and remains there until termination (according to restart policy) or deletion. In case of a Node failure, identical Pods are scheduled on other available Nodes in the cluster.</p>
@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ their Replica Sets.
## When to use a Replica Set?
A Replica Set ensures that a specified number of pod replicas are running at any given
A Replica Set ensures that a specified number of pod "replicas" are running at any given
time. However, a Deployment is a higher-level concept that manages Replica Sets and
provides declarative updates to pods along with a lot of other useful features.
Therefore, we recommend using Deployments instead of directly using Replica Sets, unless

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