Answers to introductory SQL exercises found at http://sqlbolt.com/.
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README.md

README.md

Introduction to SQL Exercises

Exercises completed at http://sqlbolt.com/ between July 6th and 12th 2016.

Lesson 1: SELECT queries 101

ANSWERS:

SELECT title 
FROM movies;


SELECT director
FROM movies;


SELECT title, director
FROM movies;


SELECT title, year
FROM movies;


SELECT *
FROM movies;

Lesson 2: Queries with constraints (Pt.1)

ANSWERS:

SELECT * 
FROM movies
WHERE id = 6;


SELECT *
FROM movies 
WHERE year BETWEEN 2000 and 2010;


SELECT *
FROM movies
WHERE year NOT BETWEEN 2000 and 2010;


SELECT *
FROM movies
WHERE id BETWEEN 1 AND 5;

There is also the IN and NOT IN operators which operate on a list like (2,4,6).

Lesson 3: Queries with constraints (Pt.2)

Here are some string comparison and pattern matching operators.

Operator Condition Example
= Case sensitive exact string comparison (notice the single equals) col_name = "abc"
!= or <> Case sensitive exact string inequality comparison col_name != "abcd"
LIKE Case insensitive exact string comparison col_name LIKE "ABC"
NOT LIKE Case insensitive exact string inequality comparison col_name NOT LIKE "ABCD"
% Used anywhere in a string to match a sequence of zero or more characters (only with LIKE or NOT LIKE) col_name LIKE "%AT%" (matches "AT", "ATTIC", "CAT" or even "BATS")
_ Used anywhere in a string to match a single character (only with LIKE or NOT LIKE) col_name LIKE "AN_" (matches "AND", but not "AN")
IN (…) String exists in a list col_name IN ("A", "B", "C")
NOT IN (…) String does not exist in a list col_name NOT IN ("D", "E", "F")

ANSWERS:

SELECT *
FROM movies
WHERE title LIKE "%Toy Story%";


SELECT *
FROM movies
WHERE director = "John Lasseter";


SELECT *
FROM movies
WHERE director != "John Lasseter";


SELECT *
FROM movies
WHERE title LIKE "WALL-%";

Lesson 4: Filtering and sorting query results

Even though the data in a database may be unique, the results of any particular query may not be – take our Movies table for example, many different movies can be released the same year. In such cases, SQL provides a convenient way to discard rows that have any duplicate column value by using the DISTINCT keyword.

SELECT DISTINCT column, another_column, …
FROM mytable
WHERE condition(s);

SQL provides a way to sort your results by a given column in ascending or descending order using the ORDER BY clause.

SELECT column, another_column, …
FROM mytable
WHERE condition(s)
ORDER BY column ASC/DESC;

The LIMIT will reduce the number of rows to return, and the optional OFFSET will specify where to begin counting the number rows from.

SELECT column, another_column, …
FROM mytable
WHERE condition(s)
ORDER BY column ASC/DESC
LIMIT num_limit OFFSET num_offset;

ANSWERS

SELECT DISTINCT director 
FROM movies
ORDER BY director ASC;


SELECT *
FROM movies
ORDER BY year DESC
LIMIT 4;


SELECT *
FROM movies
ORDER BY title ASC
LIMIT 5;


SELECT *
FROM movies
ORDER BY title ASC
LIMIT 5
OFFSET 5;

LESSON 5: SQL Review: Simple SELECT queries

SELECT country, population 
FROM north_american_cities
WHERE country = "Canada";


SELECT city
FROM north_american_cities
WHERE country = "United States"
ORDER BY latitude DESC;


SELECT city
FROM north_american_cities
WHERE longitude < (
    SELECT longitude
    FROM north_american_cities
    WHERE city = "Chicago"
)
ORDER BY longitude ASC;


SELECT city
FROM north_american_cities
WHERE country = "Mexico" 
ORDER BY population DESC
LIMIT 2;


SELECT city, population
FROM north_american_cities
WHERE country = "United States"
ORDER BY population DESC
LIMIT 2
OFFSET 2;

LESSON 6: Multi-table queries with JOINs

Entity data in the real world is often broken down into pieces and stored across multiple orthogonal tables using a process known as normalization. Database normalization is useful because it minimizes duplicate data in any single table, and allows for data in the database to grow independently of each other (ie. Types of car engines can grow independent of each type of car).

The INNER JOIN is a process that matches rows from the first table and the second table which have the same key (as defined by the ON constraint) to create a result row with the combined columns from both tables. After the tables are joined, the other clauses we learned previously are then applied.

SELECT column, another_table_column, …
FROM mytable
INNER JOIN another_table
    ON mytable.id = another_table.id
WHERE condition(s)
ORDER BY column, … ASC/DESC
LIMIT num_limit OFFSET num_offset;

ANSWERS:

SELECT title, domestic_sales, international_sales
FROM movies
INNER JOIN boxoffice
    ON movies.id = boxoffice.movie_id;


SELECT *
FROM movies
INNER JOIN boxoffice
    ON movies.id = boxoffice.movie_id
WHERE international_sales > domestic_sales;


SELECT title, rating
FROM movies
INNER JOIN boxoffice
    ON movies.id = boxoffice.movie_id
ORDER BY rating DESC;

LESSON 7: OUTER JOINs

If the two tables have asymmetric data, which can easily happen when data is entered in different stages, then we would have to use a LEFT JOIN, RIGHT JOIN or FULL JOIN instead to ensure that the data you need is not left out of the results.

SELECT column, another_column, …
FROM mytable
INNER/LEFT/RIGHT/FULL JOIN another_table 
    ON mytable.id = another_table.matching_id
WHERE condition(s)
ORDER BY column, … ASC/DESC
LIMIT num_limit OFFSET num_offset;

Note that the OUTER keyword is optional (LEFT OUTER JOIN === LEFT JOIN).

ANSWERS:

SELECT DISTINCT building_name
FROM buildings
LEFT JOIN employees
    ON buildings.building_name = employees.building
WHERE building IS NOT NULL;


SELECT *
FROM buildings;


SELECT DISTINCT building_name, role
FROM buildings
LEFT JOIN employees
    ON buildings.building_name = employees.building;

LESSON 8: A short note on NULLs

ANSWERS:

SELECT *
FROM employees
LEFT JOIN buildings
    ON employees.building = buildings.building_name
WHERE building_name IS NULL;


SELECT *
FROM buildings
LEFT JOIN employees
    ON buildings.building_name = employees.building
WHERE role IS NULL;

LESSON 9: Queries with expressions

An example of a query with expressions (using basic mathematical/string functions to transform values when the query is executed).

SELECT particle_speed / 2.0 AS half_particle_speed
FROM physics_data
WHERE ABS(particle_position) * 10.0 > 500;

or

SELECT column AS better_column_name, …
FROM a_long_widgets_table_name AS mywidgets
INNER JOIN widget_sales
  ON mywidgets.id = widget_sales.widget_id;

ANSWERS:

SELECT
    title,
    (domestic_sales + international_sales)/1000000 AS sales
FROM boxoffice AS b
INNER JOIN movies AS m
    ON m.id = b.movie_id;


SELECT
    title,
    rating*10 AS ratings_percent
FROM boxoffice AS b
INNER JOIN movies AS m
    ON m.id = b.movie_id;


SELECT title, year
FROM boxoffice AS b
INNER JOIN movies AS m
    ON m.id = b.movie_id
WHERE year % 2 = 0
ORDER BY year ASC;

LESSON 10: Queries with aggregates (Pt.1)

SELECT AGG_FUNC(column_or_expression) AS aggregate_description, …
FROM mytable
WHERE constraint_expression
GROUP BY column;
Function Description
COUNT(*)
COUNT(column)
A common function used to counts the number of rows in the group if no column name is specified. Otherwise, count the number of rows in the group with non-NULL values in the specified column.
MIN(column) Finds the smallest numerical value in the specified column for all rows in the group.
MAX(column) Finds the largest numerical value in the specified column for all rows in the group.
AVG(column) Finds the average numerical value in the specified column for all rows in the group.
SUM(column) Finds the sum of all numerical values in the specified column for the rows in the group.

ANSWERS:

SELECT MAX(years_employed) as longest_years
FROM employees;


SELECT
    role,
    AVG(years_employed)AS average_years_employed
FROM employees
GROUP BY role;


SELECT
    building,
    SUM(years_employed)AS sum_of_years_employed
FROM employees
GROUP BY building;

LESSON 11: Queries with aggregates (Pt.2)

SELECT group_by_column, AGG_FUNC(column_expression) AS aggregate_result_alias, …
FROM mytable
WHERE condition
GROUP BY column
HAVING group_condition;

ANSWERS:

SELECT COUNT(role)
FROM employees
WHERE role = 'Artist';

SELECT
    role,
    COUNT(name) AS number_of_employees
FROM employees
GROUP BY role;

SELECT
    role,
    SUM(years_employed)
FROM employees
GROUP BY role
HAVING role = "Engineer";

LESSON 12: Order of execution of a query

The order of execution of different parts of a query is: 1. FROM and JOINs 2. WHERE 3. GROUP BY 4. HAVING 5. SELECT 6. DISTINCT 7. ORDER BY 8. LIMIT and OFFSET

ANSWERS:

SELECT
    director,
    COUNT(*)
FROM movies
GROUP BY director;


SELECT
    director,
    SUM(domestic_sales + international_sales) AS total_sales 
FROM movies
INNER JOIN boxoffice
    ON movies.id = boxoffice.movie_id
GROUP BY director;

LESSON 13: Inserting rows

INSERT INTO mytable
(column, another_column, …)
VALUES (value_or_expr, another_value_or_expr, …),
      (value_or_expr_2, another_value_or_expr_2, …),
      …;

ANSWERS:

INSERT INTO movies
    (title, director, year, length_minutes)
VALUES
    ('Toy Story 4', 'Lance Lafontaine', 2984, 15);


INSERT INTO boxoffice
    (movie_id, rating, domestic_sales, international_sales)
VALUES
    (15, 8.7, 340000000, 270000000);

LESSON 14: Updating rows

UPDATE mytable
SET column = value_or_expr, 
    other_column = another_value_or_expr, 
    …
WHERE condition;

ANSWERS:

UPDATE movies
SET director = "John Lasseter"
WHERE title = "A Bug's Life";


UPDATE movies
SET
    title = 'Toy Story 3',
    director = 'Lee Unkrich'
WHERE id = (
    SELECT id
    FROM movies
    WHERE title = 'Toy Story 8'
); 

LESSON 15: Deleting rows

DELETE FROM mytable
WHERE condition;

ANSWERS:

DELETE FROM movies
WHERE year < 2005;


DELETE FROM movies
WHERE director = 'Andrew Stanton';

LESSON 16: Creating tables

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS mytable (
    column DataType TableConstraint DEFAULT default_value,
    another_column DataType TableConstraint DEFAULT default_value,
    …
);
Common Database Data Types Description
INTEGER
BOOLEAN
The integer datatypes can store whole integer values like the count of a number or an age. In some implementations, the boolean value is just represented as an integer value of just 0 or 1.
FLOAT
DOUBLE
REAL
The floating point datatypes can store more precise numerical data like measurements or fractional values. Different types can be used depending on the floating point precision required for that value.
CHARACTER(num_chars)
VARCHAR(num_chars)
TEXT
The text based datatypes can store strings and text in all sorts of locales. The distinction between the various types generally amount to underlaying efficiency of the database when working with these columns.
Both the CHARACTER and VARCHAR (variable character) types are specified with the max number of characters that they can store (longer values may be truncated), so can be more efficient to store and query with big tables.
DATE
DATETIME
SQL can also store date and time stamps to keep track of time series and event data. They can be tricky to work with especially when manipulating data across timezones.
BLOB Finally, SQL can store binary data in blobs right in the database. These values are often opaque to the database, so you usually have to store them with the right metadata to requery them.
Common Database Table Constraints Description
PRIMARY KEY This means that the values in this column are unique, and each value can be used to identify a single row in this table.
AUTOINCREMENT For integer values, this means that the value is automatically filled in and incremented with each row insertion. Not supported in all databases.
UNIQUE This means that the values in this column have to be unique, so you can't insert another row with the same value in this column as another row in the table. Differs from the PRIMARY KEY in that it doesn't have to be a key for a row in the table.
NOT NULL This means that the inserted value can not be NULL.
CHECK (expression) FThis is allows you to run a more complex expression to test whether the values inserted are value. For example, you can check that values are positive, or greater than a specific size, or start with a certain prefix, etc.
FOREIGN KEY This is a consistency check which ensures that each value in this column corresponds to another value in a column in another table.
For example, if there are two tables, one listing all Employees by ID, and another listing their payroll information, the FOREIGN KEY can ensure that every row in the payroll table corresponds to a valid employee in the master Employee list.

ANSWERS:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Database (
    Name TEXT,
    Version FLOAT,
    Download_count INTEGER
);

LESSON 17: Altering tables

ALTER TABLE mytable
ADD column DataType OptionalTableConstraint 
    DEFAULT default_value;

ALTER TABLE mytable
DROP column_to_be_deleted;

ALTER TABLE mytable
RENAME TO new_table_name;

ANSWERS:

ALTER TABLE movies
ADD aspect_ratio FLOAT;


ALTER TABLE movies
ADD language TEXT
    DEFAULT 'English';

LESSON 18: Dropping tables

ANSWERS:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS mytable;


DROP TABLE IF EXISTS boxoffice;