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2041-Functional_Programming
3081-Program_Design_And_Development_Individual
4061-Intro_To_Operating_Systems
4131-Internet_Programming
4211-Intro_To_Computer_Networks
4511W-Intro_To_Artificial_Intelligence
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README.md

README.md

apollo-academia-umn

Introduction

apollo-academia-umn is a merged repository from various smaller repositories, containing code and assignment solutions from a variety of classes I have taken throughout my undergraduate career.

Each folder was previously an individual repository, but I have decided to combine it all into one larger repository for ease of organization.

Most of the code is in functional state. (I usually indicate what doesn't work) Also note that I have decided to maintain the master branch with squashed merges instead of a full merge to keep history between branches separate (as each branch is unrelated, and combining all the commits made no sense).

An index of branches (that used to be repositories) can be found below, along with links to my other standalone repositories that may contain even more code. Alternatively click on the branches link on GitHub to view all branches, which were individual repos before they were squashed.

List of Courses And Projects

Fall 2015

Spring 2014

Fall 2014

Notes

A precautionary note for students that stumble upon this repository by searching for project solutions: Do not blatantly copy all the code. While it is open source for reference, using the code without providing attribution as well as claiming it as code written by yourself is plagiarism, which is grounds for failing an entire course or even getting expelled. Yes I know you've heard of it, and probably won't listen if you're desperate, but you won't learn by copying code, and you risk getting caught (a lot of professors actually do enforce these rules, take it from me), this is a huge risk. Besides, if you don't know the in and outs of these projects, you won't be able to properly learn the concepts, this stuff is actually used in real life. I didn't believe it too but the concepts I've learned from these projects have been a recurring theme for other things I've worked on. There's a fine line between referring, and blatantly copying. Just like to warn others so that they do not suffer later.

On that note, instructors of this class please do not hesitate to contact me should the open source nature of this repo be an issue.