A library of C++ coroutine abstractions for the coroutines TS
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README.md

CppCoro - A coroutine library for C++

The 'cppcoro' library provides a set of general-purpose primitives for making use of the coroutines TS proposal described in N4680.

These include:

  • Coroutine Types
    • task<T>
    • shared_task<T>
    • generator<T>
    • recursive_generator<T>
    • async_generator<T>
  • Awaitable Types
    • single_consumer_event
    • single_consumer_auto_reset_event
    • async_mutex
    • async_manual_reset_event
    • async_auto_reset_event
    • async_latch
  • Functions
    • sync_wait()
    • when_all()
    • when_all_ready()
    • fmap()
    • schedule_on()
    • resume_on()
  • Cancellation
    • cancellation_token
    • cancellation_source
    • cancellation_registration
  • Schedulers and I/O
    • static_thread_pool
    • io_service
    • io_work_scope
    • file, readable_file, writable_file
    • read_only_file, write_only_file, read_write_file Networking
    • socket
    • ip_address, ipv4_address, ipv6_address
    • ip_endpoint, ipv4_endpoint, ipv6_endpoint
  • Metafunctions
    • is_awaitable<T>
    • awaitable_traits<T>
  • Concepts
    • Awaitable<T>
    • Awaiter<T>
    • Scheduler
    • DelayedScheduler

This library is an experimental library that is exploring the space of high-performance, scalable asynchronous programming abstractions that can be built on top of the C++ coroutines proposal.

It has been open-sourced in the hope that others will find it useful and that the C++ community can provide feedback on it and ways to improve it.

It requires a compiler that supports the coroutines TS:

  • Windows + Visual Studio 2017 Windows Build Status
  • Linux + Clang 5.0/6.0 + libc++ Build Status

The Linux version is functional except for the io_context and file I/O related classes which have not yet been implemented for Linux (see issue #15 for more info).

Class Details

task<T>

A task represents an asynchronous computation that is executed lazily in that the execution of the coroutine does not start until the task is awaited.

Example:

#include <cppcoro/read_only_file.hpp>
#include <cppcoro/task.hpp>

cppcoro::task<int> count_lines(std::string path)
{
  auto file = co_await cppcoro::read_only_file::open(path);

  int lineCount = 0;

  char buffer[1024];
  size_t bytesRead;
  std::uint64_t offset = 0;
  do
  {
    bytesRead = co_await file.read(offset, buffer, sizeof(buffer));
    lineCount += std::count(buffer, buffer + bytesRead, '\n');
    offset += bytesRead;
  } while (bytesRead > 0);
  
  co_return lineCount;
}

cppcoro::task<> usage_example()
{
  // Calling function creates a new task but doesn't start
  // executing the coroutine yet.
  cppcoro::task<int> countTask = count_lines("foo.txt");
  
  // ...
  
  // Coroutine is only started when we later co_await the task.
  int lineCount = co_await countTask;

  std::cout << "line count = " << lineCount << std::endl;
}

API Overview:

// <cppcoro/task.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  template<typename T>
  class task
  {
  public:

    using promise_type = <unspecified>;
    using value_type = T;

    task() noexcept;

    task(task&& other) noexcept;
    task& operator=(task&& other);

    // task is a move-only type.
    task(const task& other) = delete;
    task& operator=(const task& other) = delete;

    // Query if the task result is ready.
    bool is_ready() const noexcept;

    // Wait for the task to complete and return the result or rethrow the
    // exception if the operation completed with an unhandled exception.
    //
    // If the task is not yet ready then the awaiting coroutine will be
    // suspended until the task completes. If the the task is_ready() then
    // this operation will return the result synchronously without suspending.
    Awaiter<T&> operator co_await() const & noexcept;
    Awaiter<T&&> operator co_await() const && noexcept;

    // Returns an awaitable that can be co_await'ed to suspend the current
    // coroutine until the task completes.
    //
    // The 'co_await t.when_ready()' expression differs from 'co_await t' in
    // that when_ready() only performs synchronisation, it does not return
    // the result or rethrow the exception.
    //
    // This can be useful if you want to synchronise with the task without
    // the possibility of it throwing an exception.
    Awaitable<void> when_ready() const noexcept;
  };

  template<typename T>
  void swap(task<T>& a, task<T>& b);

  // Creates a task that yields the result of co_await'ing the specified awaitable.
  //
  // This can be used as a form of type-erasure of the concrete awaitable, allowing
  // different awaitables that return the same await-result type to be stored in
  // the same task<RESULT> type.
  template<
    typename AWAITABLE,
    typename RESULT = typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLE>::await_result_t>
  task<RESULT> make_task(AWAITABLE awaitable);
}

You create a task<T> object by calling a coroutine function that returns a task<T>.

The coroutine must contain a usage of either co_await or co_return. Note that a task<T> coroutine may not use the co_yield keyword.

When a coroutine that returns a task<T> is called, a coroutine frame is allocated if necessary and the parameters are captured in the coroutine frame. The coroutine is suspended at the start of the coroutine body and execution is returned to the caller and a task<T> value that represents the asynchronous computation is returned from the function call.

The coroutine body will start executing when the task<T> value is co_awaited. This will suspend the awaiting coroutine and start execution of the coroutine associated with the awaited task<T> value.

The awaiting coroutine will later be resumed on the thread that completes execution of the awaited task<T>'s coroutine. ie. the thread that executes the co_return or that throws an unhandled exception that terminates execution of the coroutine.

If the task has already run to completion then awaiting it again will obtain the already-computed result without suspending the awaiting coroutine.

If the task object is destroyed before it is awaited then the coroutine never executes and the destructor simply destructs the captured parameters and frees any memory used by the coroutine frame.

shared_task<T>

The shared_task<T> class is a coroutine type that yields a single value asynchronously.

It is 'lazy' in that execution of the task does not start until it is awaited by some coroutine.

It is 'shared' in that the task value can be copied, allowing multiple references to the result of the task to be created. It also allows multiple coroutines to concurrently await the result.

The task will start executing on the thread that first co_awaits the task. Subsequent awaiters will either be suspended and be queued for resumption when the task completes or will continue synchronously if the task has already run to completion.

If an awaiter is suspended while waiting for the task to complete then it will be resumed on the thread that completes execution of the task. ie. the thread that executes the co_return or that throws the unhandled exception that terminates execution of the coroutine.

API Summary

namespace cppcoro
{
  template<typename T = void>
  class shared_task
  {
  public:

    using promise_type = <unspecified>;
    using value_type = T;

    shared_task() noexcept;
    shared_task(const shared_task& other) noexcept;
    shared_task(shared_task&& other) noexcept;
    shared_task& operator=(const shared_task& other) noexcept;
    shared_task& operator=(shared_task&& other) noexcept;

    void swap(shared_task& other) noexcept;

    // Query if the task has completed and the result is ready.
    bool is_ready() const noexcept;

    // Returns an operation that when awaited will suspend the
    // current coroutine until the task completes and the result
    // is available.
    //
    // The type of the result of the 'co_await someTask' expression
    // is an l-value reference to the task's result value (unless T
    // is void in which case the expression has type 'void').
    // If the task completed with an unhandled exception then the
    // exception will be rethrown by the co_await expression.
    Awaiter<T&> operator co_await() const noexcept;

    // Returns an operation that when awaited will suspend the
    // calling coroutine until the task completes and the result
    // is available.
    //
    // The result is not returned from the co_await expression.
    // This can be used to synchronise with the task without the
    // possibility of the co_await expression throwing an exception.
    Awaiter<void> when_ready() const noexcept;

  };

  template<typename T>
  bool operator==(const shared_task<T>& a, const shared_task<T>& b) noexcept;
  template<typename T>
  bool operator!=(const shared_task<T>& a, const shared_task<T>& b) noexcept;

  template<typename T>
  void swap(shared_task<T>& a, shared_task<T>& b) noexcept;

  // Wrap an awaitable value in a shared_task to allow multiple coroutines
  // to concurrently await the result.
  template<
    typename AWAITABLE,
    typename RESULT = typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLE>::await_result_t>
  shared_task<RESULT> make_shared_task(AWAITABLE awaitable);
}

All const-methods on shared_task<T> are safe to call concurrently with other const-methods on the same instance from multiple threads. It is not safe to call non-const methods of shared_task<T> concurrently with any other method on the same instance of a shared_task<T>.

Comparison to task<T>

The shared_task<T> class is similar to task<T> in that the task does not start execution immediately upon the coroutine function being called. The task only starts executing when it is first awaited.

It differs from task<T> in that the resulting task object can be copied, allowing multiple task objects to reference the same asynchronous result. It also supports multiple coroutines concurrently awaiting the result of the task.

The trade-off is that the result is always an l-value reference to the result, never an r-value reference (since the result may be shared) which may limit ability to move-construct the result into a local variable. It also has a slightly higher run-time cost due to the need to maintain a reference count and support multiple awaiters.

generator<T>

A generator represents a coroutine type that produces a sequence of values of type, T, where values are produced lazily and synchronously.

The coroutine body is able to yield values of type T using the co_yield keyword. Note, however, that the coroutine body is not able to use the co_await keyword; values must be produced synchronously.

For example:

cppcoro::generator<const std::uint64_t> fibonacci()
{
  std::uint64_t a = 0, b = 1;
  while (true)
  {
    co_yield b;
    auto tmp = a;
    a = b;
    b += tmp;
  }
}

void usage()
{
  for (auto i : fibonacci())
  {
    if (i > 1'000'000) break;
    std::cout << i << std::endl;
  }
}

When a coroutine function returning a generator<T> is called the coroutine is created initially suspended. Execution of the coroutine enters the coroutine body when the generator<T>::begin() method is called and continues until either the first co_yield statement is reached or the coroutine runs to completion.

If the returned iterator is not equal to the end() iterator then dereferencing the iterator will return a reference to the value passed to the co_yield statement.

Calling operator++() on the iterator will resume execution of the coroutine and continue until either the next co_yield point is reached or the coroutine runs to completion().

Any unhandled exceptions thrown by the coroutine will propagate out of the begin() or operator++() calls to the caller.

API Summary:

namespace cppcoro
{
    template<typename T>
    class generator
    {
    public:

        using promise_type = <unspecified>;

        class iterator
        {
        public:
            using iterator_category = std::input_iterator_tag;
            using value_type = std::remove_reference_t<T>;
            using reference = value_type&;
            using pointer = value_type*;
            using difference_type = std::size_t;

            iterator(const iterator& other) noexcept;
            iterator& operator=(const iterator& other) noexcept;

            // If the generator coroutine throws an unhandled exception before producing
            // the next element then the exception will propagate out of this call.
            iterator& operator++();

            reference operator*() const noexcept;
            pointer operator->() const noexcept;

            bool operator==(const iterator& other) const noexcept;
            bool operator!=(const iterator& other) const noexcept;
        };

        // Constructs to the empty sequence.
        generator() noexcept;

        generator(generator&& other) noexcept;
        generator& operator=(generator&& other) noexcept;
        
        generator(const generator& other) = delete;
        generator& operator=(const generator&) = delete;

        ~generator();

        // Starts executing the generator coroutine which runs until either a value is yielded
        // or the coroutine runs to completion or an unhandled exception propagates out of the
        // the coroutine.
        iterator begin();

        iterator end() noexcept;

        // Swap the contents of two generators.
        void swap(generator& other) noexcept;

    };

    template<typename T>
    void swap(generator<T>& a, generator<T>& b) noexcept;

    // Apply function, func, lazily to each element of the source generator
    // and yield a sequence of the results of calls to func().
    template<typename FUNC, typename T>
    generator<std::invoke_result_t<FUNC, T&>> fmap(FUNC func, generator<T> source);
}

recursive_generator<T>

A recursive_generator is similar to a generator except that it is designed to more efficiently support yielding the elements of a nested sequence as elements of an outer sequence.

In addition to being able to co_yield a value of type T you can also co_yield a value of type recursive_generator<T>.

When you co_yield a recursive_generator<T> value the all elements of the yielded generator are yielded as elements of the current generator. The current coroutine is suspended until the consumer has finished consuming all elements of the nested generator, after which point execution of the current coroutine will resume execution to produce the next element.

The benefit of recursive_generator<T> over generator<T> for iterating over recursive data-structures is that the iterator::operator++() is able to directly resume the leaf-most coroutine to produce the next element, rather than having to resume/suspend O(depth) coroutines for each element. The down-side is that there is additional overhead

For example:

// Lists the immediate contents of a directory.
cppcoro::generator<dir_entry> list_directory(std::filesystem::path path);

cppcoro::recursive_generator<dir_entry> list_directory_recursive(std::filesystem::path path)
{
  for (auto& entry : list_directory(path))
  {
    co_yield entry;
    if (entry.is_directory())
    {
      co_yield list_directory_recursive(entry.path());
    }
  }
}

Note that applying the fmap() operator to a recursive_generator<T> will yield a generator<U> type rather than a recursive_generator<U>. This is because uses of fmap are generally not used in recursive contexts and we try to avoid the extra overhead incurred by recursive_generator.

async_generator<T>

An async_generator represents a coroutine type that produces a sequence of values of type, T, where values are produced lazily and values may be produced asynchronously.

The coroutine body is able to use both co_await and co_yield expressions.

Consumers of the generator can use a for co_await range-based for-loop to consume the values.

Example

cppcoro::async_generator<int> ticker(int count, threadpool& tp)
{
  for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i)
  {
    co_await tp.delay(std::chrono::seconds(1));
    co_yield i;
  }
}

cppcoro::task<> consumer(threadpool& tp)
{
  auto sequence = ticker(10, tp);
  for co_await(std::uint32_t i : sequence)
  {
    std::cout << "Tick " << i << std::endl;
  }
}

API Summary

// <cppcoro/async_generator.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  template<typename T>
  class async_generator
  {
  public:

    class iterator
    {
    public:
      using iterator_tag = std::forward_iterator_tag;
      using difference_type = std::size_t;
      using value_type = std::remove_reference_t<T>;
      using reference = value_type&;
      using pointer = value_type*;
      
      iterator(const iterator& other) noexcept;
      iterator& operator=(const iterator& other) noexcept;

      // Resumes the generator coroutine if suspended
      // Returns an operation object that must be awaited to wait
      // for the increment operation to complete.
      // If the coroutine runs to completion then the iterator
      // will subsequently become equal to the end() iterator.
      // If the coroutine completes with an unhandled exception then
      // that exception will be rethrown from the co_await expression.
      Awaitable<iterator&> operator++() noexcept;

      // Dereference the iterator.
      pointer operator->() const noexcept;
      reference operator*() const noexcept;

      bool operator==(const iterator& other) const noexcept;
      bool operator!=(const iterator& other) const noexcept;
    };

    // Construct to the empty sequence.
    async_generator() noexcept;
    async_generator(const async_generator&) = delete;
    async_generator(async_generator&& other) noexcept;
    ~async_generator();

    async_generator& operator=(const async_generator&) = delete;
    async_generator& operator=(async_generator&& other) noexcept;

    void swap(async_generator& other) noexcept;

    // Starts execution of the coroutine and returns an operation object
    // that must be awaited to wait for the first value to become available.
    // The result of co_await'ing the returned object is an iterator that
    // can be used to advance to subsequent elements of the sequence.
    //
    // This method is not valid to be called once the coroutine has
    // run to completion.
    Awaitable<iterator> begin() noexcept;
    iterator end() noexcept;

  };

  template<typename T>
  void swap(async_generator<T>& a, async_generator<T>& b);

  // Apply 'func' to each element of the source generator, yielding a sequence of
  // the results of calling 'func' on the source elements.
  template<typename FUNC, typename T>
  async_generator<std::invoke_result_t<FUNC, T&>> fmap(FUNC func, async_generator<T> source);
}

Early termination of an async_generator

When the async_generator object is destructed it requests cancellation of the underlying coroutine. If the coroutine has already run to completion or is currently suspended in a co_yield expression then the coroutine is destroyed immediately. Otherwise, the coroutine will continue execution until it either runs to completion or reaches the next co_yield expression.

When the coroutine frame is destroyed the destructors of all variables in scope at that point will be executed to ensure the resources of the generator are cleaned up.

Note that the caller must ensure that the async_generator object must not be destroyed while a consumer coroutine is executing a co_await expression waiting for the next item to be produced.

single_consumer_event

This is a simple manual-reset event type that supports only a single coroutine awaiting it at a time. This can be used to

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/single_consumer_event.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  class single_consumer_event
  {
  public:
    single_consumer_event(bool initiallySet = false) noexcept;
    bool is_set() const noexcept;
    void set();
    void reset() noexcept;
    Awaiter<void> operator co_await() const noexcept;
  };
}

Example:

#include <cppcoro/single_consumer_event.hpp>

cppcoro::single_consumer_event event;
std::string value;

cppcoro::task<> consumer()
{
  // Coroutine will suspend here until some thread calls event.set()
  // eg. inside the producer() function below.
  co_await event;

  std::cout << value << std::endl;
}

void producer()
{
  value = "foo";

  // This will resume the consumer() coroutine inside the call to set()
  // if it is currently suspended.
  event.set();
}

single_consumer_async_auto_reset_event

This class provides an async synchronisation primitive that allows a single coroutine to wait until the event is signalled by a call to the set() method.

Once the coroutine that is awaiting the event is released by either a prior or subsequent call to set() the event is automatically reset back to the 'not set' state.

This class is a more efficient version of async_auto_reset_event that can be used in cases where only a single coroutine will be awaiting the event at a time. If you need to support multiple concurrent awaiting coroutines on the event then use the async_auto_reset_event class instead.

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/single_consumer_async_auto_reset_event.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  class single_consumer_async_auto_reset_event
  {
  public:

    single_consumer_async_auto_reset_event(
      bool initiallySet = false) noexcept;

    // Change the event to the 'set' state. If a coroutine is awaiting the
    // event then the event is immediately transitioned back to the 'not set'
    // state and the coroutine is resumed.
    void set() noexcept;

    // Returns an Awaitable type that can be awaited to wait until
    // the event becomes 'set' via a call to the .set() method. If
    // the event is already in the 'set' state then the coroutine
    // continues without suspending.
    // The event is automatically reset back to the 'not set' state
    // before resuming the coroutine.
    Awaiter<void> operator co_await() const noexcept;

  };
}

Example Usage:

std::atomic<int> value;
cppcoro::single_consumer_async_auto_reset_event valueDecreasedEvent;

cppcoro::task<> wait_until_value_is_below(int limit)
{
  while (value.load(std::memory_order_relaxed) >= limit)
  {
    // Wait until there has been some change that we're interested in.
    co_await valueDecreasedEvent;
  }
}

void change_value(int delta)
{
  value.fetch_add(delta, std::memory_order_relaxed);
  // Notify the waiter if there has been some change.
  if (delta < 0) valueDecreasedEvent.set();
}

async_mutex

Provides a simple mutual exclusion abstraction that allows the caller to 'co_await' the mutex from within a coroutine to suspend the coroutine until the mutex lock is acquired.

The implementation is lock-free in that a coroutine that awaits the mutex will not block the thread but will instead suspend the coroutine and later resume it inside the call to unlock() by the previous lock-holder.

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/async_mutex.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  class async_mutex_lock;
  class async_mutex_lock_operation;
  class async_mutex_scoped_lock_operation;

  class async_mutex
  {
  public:
    async_mutex() noexcept;
    ~async_mutex();

    async_mutex(const async_mutex&) = delete;
    async_mutex& operator(const async_mutex&) = delete;

    bool try_lock() noexcept;
    async_mutex_lock_operation lock_async() noexcept;
    async_mutex_scoped_lock_operation scoped_lock_async() noexcept;
    void unlock();
  };

  class async_mutex_lock_operation
  {
  public:
    bool await_ready() const noexcept;
    bool await_suspend(std::experimental::coroutine_handle<> awaiter) noexcept;
    void await_resume() const noexcept;
  };

  class async_mutex_scoped_lock_operation
  {
  public:
    bool await_ready() const noexcept;
    bool await_suspend(std::experimental::coroutine_handle<> awaiter) noexcept;
    [[nodiscard]] async_mutex_lock await_resume() const noexcept;
  };

  class async_mutex_lock
  {
  public:
    // Takes ownership of the lock.
    async_mutex_lock(async_mutex& mutex, std::adopt_lock_t) noexcept;

    // Transfer ownership of the lock.
    async_mutex_lock(async_mutex_lock&& other) noexcept;

    async_mutex_lock(const async_mutex_lock&) = delete;
    async_mutex_lock& operator=(const async_mutex_lock&) = delete;

    // Releases the lock by calling unlock() on the mutex.
    ~async_mutex_lock();
  };
}

Example usage:

#include <cppcoro/async_mutex.hpp>
#include <cppcoro/task.hpp>
#include <set>
#include <string>

cppcoro::async_mutex mutex;
std::set<std::string> values;

cppcoro::task<> add_item(std::string value)
{
  cppcoro::async_mutex_lock lock = co_await mutex.scoped_lock_async();
  values.insert(std::move(value));
}

async_manual_reset_event

A manual-reset event is a coroutine/thread-synchronisation primitive that allows one or more threads to wait until the event is signalled by a thread that calls set().

The event is in one of two states; 'set' and 'not set'.

If the event is in the 'set' state when a coroutine awaits the event then the coroutine continues without suspending. However if the coroutine is in the 'not set' state then the coroutine is suspended until some thread subsequently calls the set() method.

Any threads that were suspended while waiting for the event to become 'set' will be resumed inside the next call to set() by some thread.

Note that you must ensure that no coroutines are awaiting a 'not set' event when the event is destructed as they will not be resumed.

Example:

cppcoro::async_manual_reset_event event;
std::string value;

void producer()
{
  value = get_some_string_value();

  // Publish a value by setting the event.
  event.set();
}

// Can be called many times to create many tasks.
// All consumer tasks will wait until value has been published.
cppcoro::task<> consumer()
{
  // Wait until value has been published by awaiting event.
  co_await event;

  consume_value(value);
}

API Summary:

namespace cppcoro
{
  class async_manual_reset_event_operation;

  class async_manual_reset_event
  {
  public:
    async_manual_reset_event(bool initiallySet = false) noexcept;
    ~async_manual_reset_event();

    async_manual_reset_event(const async_manual_reset_event&) = delete;
    async_manual_reset_event(async_manual_reset_event&&) = delete;
    async_manual_reset_event& operator=(const async_manual_reset_event&) = delete;
    async_manual_reset_event& operator=(async_manual_reset_event&&) = delete;

    // Wait until the event becomes set.
    async_manual_reset_event_operation operator co_await() const noexcept;

    bool is_set() const noexcept;

    void set() noexcept;

    void reset() noexcept;

  };

  class async_manual_reset_event_operation
  {
  public:
    async_manual_reset_event_operation(async_manual_reset_event& event) noexcept;

    bool await_ready() const noexcept;
    bool await_suspend(std::experimental::coroutine_handle<> awaiter) noexcept;
    void await_resume() const noexcept;
  };
}

async_auto_reset_event

An auto-reset event is a coroutine/thread-synchronisation primitive that allows one or more threads to wait until the event is signalled by a thread by calling set().

Once a coroutine that is awaiting the event is released by either a prior or subsequent call to set() the event is automatically reset back to the 'not set' state.

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/async_auto_reset_event.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  class async_auto_reset_event_operation;

  class async_auto_reset_event
  {
  public:

    async_auto_reset_event(bool initiallySet = false) noexcept;

    ~async_auto_reset_event();

    async_auto_reset_event(const async_auto_reset_event&) = delete;
    async_auto_reset_event(async_auto_reset_event&&) = delete;
    async_auto_reset_event& operator=(const async_auto_reset_event&) = delete;
    async_auto_reset_event& operator=(async_auto_reset_event&&) = delete;

    // Wait for the event to enter the 'set' state.
    //
    // If the event is already 'set' then the event is set to the 'not set'
    // state and the awaiting coroutine continues without suspending.
    // Otherwise, the coroutine is suspended and later resumed when some
    // thread calls 'set()'.
    //
    // Note that the coroutine may be resumed inside a call to 'set()'
    // or inside another thread's call to 'operator co_await()'.
    async_auto_reset_event_operation operator co_await() const noexcept;

    // Set the state of the event to 'set'.
    //
    // If there are pending coroutines awaiting the event then one
    // pending coroutine is resumed and the state is immediately
    // set back to the 'not set' state.
    //
    // This operation is a no-op if the event was already 'set'.
    void set() noexcept;

    // Set the state of the event to 'not-set'.
    //
    // This is a no-op if the state was already 'not set'.
    void reset() noexcept;

  };

  class async_auto_reset_event_operation
  {
  public:
    explicit async_auto_reset_event_operation(async_auto_reset_event& event) noexcept;
    async_auto_reset_event_operation(const async_auto_reset_event_operation& other) noexcept;

    bool await_ready() const noexcept;
    bool await_suspend(std::experimental::coroutine_handle<> awaiter) noexcept;
    void await_resume() const noexcept;

  };
}

async_latch

An async latch is a synchronisation primitive that allows coroutines to asynchronously wait until a counter has been decremented to zero.

The latch is a single-use object. Once the counter reaches zero the latch becomes 'ready' and will remain ready until the latch is destroyed.

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/async_latch.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  class async_latch
  {
  public:

    // Initialise the latch with the specified count.
    async_latch(std::ptrdiff_t initialCount) noexcept;

    // Query if the count has reached zero yet.
    bool is_ready() const noexcept;

    // Decrement the count by n.
    // This will resume any waiting coroutines if the count reaches zero
    // as a result of this call.
    // It is undefined behaviour to decrement the count below zero.
    void count_down(std::ptrdiff_t n = 1) noexcept;

    // Wait until the latch becomes ready.
    // If the latch count is not yet zero then the awaiting coroutine will
    // be suspended and later resumed by a call to count_down() that decrements
    // the count to zero. If the latch count was already zero then the coroutine
    // continues without suspending.
    Awaiter<void> operator co_await() const noexcept;

  };
}

cancellation_token

A cancellation_token is a value that can be passed to a function that allows the caller to subsequently communicate a request to cancel the operation to that function.

To obtain a cancellation_token that is able to be cancelled you must first create a cancellation_source object. The cancellation_source::token() method can be used to manufacture new cancellation_token values that are linked to that cancellation_source object.

When you want to later request cancellation of an operation you have passed a cancellation_token to you can call cancellation_source::request_cancellation() on an associated cancellation_source object.

Functions can respond to a request for cancellation in one of two ways:

  1. Poll for cancellation at regular intervals by calling either cancellation_token::is_cancellation_requested() or cancellation_token::throw_if_cancellation_requested().
  2. Register a callback to be executed when cancellation is requested using the cancellation_registration class.

API Summary:

namespace cppcoro
{
  class cancellation_source
  {
  public:
    // Construct a new, independently cancellable cancellation source.
    cancellation_source();

    // Construct a new reference to the same cancellation state.
    cancellation_source(const cancellation_source& other) noexcept;
    cancellation_source(cancellation_source&& other) noexcept;

    ~cancellation_source();

    cancellation_source& operator=(const cancellation_source& other) noexcept;
    cancellation_source& operator=(cancellation_source&& other) noexcept;

    bool is_cancellation_requested() const noexcept;
    bool can_be_cancelled() const noexcept;
    void request_cancellation();

    cancellation_token token() const noexcept;
  };

  class cancellation_token
  {
  public:
    // Construct a token that can't be cancelled.
    cancellation_token() noexcept;

    cancellation_token(const cancellation_token& other) noexcept;
    cancellation_token(cancellation_token&& other) noexcept;

    ~cancellation_token();

    cancellation_token& operator=(const cancellation_token& other) noexcept;
    cancellation_token& operator=(cancellation_token&& other) noexcept;

    bool is_cancellation_requested() const noexcept;
    void throw_if_cancellation_requested() const;

    // Query if this token can ever have cancellation requested.
    // Code can use this to take a more efficient code-path in cases
    // that the operation does not need to handle cancellation.
    bool can_be_cancelled() const noexcept;
  };

  // RAII class for registering a callback to be executed if cancellation
  // is requested on a particular cancellation token.
  class cancellation_registration
  {
  public:

    // Register a callback to be executed if cancellation is requested.
    // Callback will be called with no arguments on the thread that calls
    // request_cancellation() if cancellation is not yet requested, or
    // called immediately if cancellation has already been requested.
    // Callback must not throw an unhandled exception when called.
    template<typename CALLBACK>
    cancellation_registration(cancellation_token token, CALLBACK&& callback);

    cancellation_registration(const cancellation_registration& other) = delete;

    ~cancellation_registration();
  };

  class operation_cancelled : public std::exception
  {
  public:
    operation_cancelled();
    const char* what() const override;
  };
}

Example: Polling Approach

cppcoro::task<> do_something_async(cppcoro::cancellation_token token)
{
  // Explicitly define cancellation points within the function
  // by calling throw_if_cancellation_requested().
  token.throw_if_cancellation_requested();

  co_await do_step_1();

  token.throw_if_cancellation_requested();

  do_step_2();

  // Alternatively, you can query if cancellation has been
  // requested to allow yourself to do some cleanup before
  // returning.
  if (token.is_cancellation_requested())
  {
    display_message_to_user("Cancelling operation...");
    do_cleanup();
    throw cppcoro::operation_cancelled{};
  }

  do_final_step();
}

Example: Callback Approach

// Say we already have a timer abstraction that supports being
// cancelled but it doesn't support cancellation_tokens natively.
// You can use a cancellation_registration to register a callback
// that calls the existing cancellation API. e.g.
cppcoro::task<> cancellable_timer_wait(cppcoro::cancellation_token token)
{
  auto timer = create_timer(10s);

  cppcoro::cancellation_registration registration(token, [&]
  {
    // Call existing timer cancellation API.
    timer.cancel();
  });

  co_await timer;
}

static_thread_pool

The static_thread_pool class provides an abstraction that lets you schedule work on a fixed-size pool of threads.

This class implements the Scheduler concept (see below).

You can enqueue work to the thread-pool by executing co_await threadPool.schedule(). This operation will suspend the current coroutine, enqueue it for execution on the thread-pool and the thread pool will then resume the coroutine when a thread in the thread-pool is next free to run the coroutine. This operation is guaranteed not to throw and, in the common case, will not allocate any memory.

This class makes use of a work-stealing algorithm to load-balance work across multiple threads. Work enqueued to the thread-pool from a thread-pool thread will be scheduled for execution on the same thread in a LIFO queue. Work enqueued to the thread-pool from a remote thread will be enqueued to a global FIFO queue. When a worker thread runs out of work from its local queue it first tries to dequeue work from the global queue. If that queue is empty then it next tries to steal work from the back of the queues of the other worker threads.

API Summary:

namespace cppcoro
{
  class static_thread_pool
  {
  public:
    // Initialise the thread-pool with a number of threads equal to
    // std::thread::hardware_concurrency().
    static_thread_pool();

    // Initialise the thread pool with the specified number of threads.
    explicit static_thread_pool(std::uint32_t threadCount);

    std::uint32_t thread_count() const noexcept;

    class schedule_operation
    {
    public:
      schedule_operation(static_thread_pool* tp) noexcept;

      bool await_ready() noexcept;
      bool await_suspend(std::experimental::coroutine_handle<> h) noexcept;
      bool await_resume() noexcept;

    private:
      // unspecified
    };

    // Return an operation that can be awaited by a coroutine.
    //
    // 
    [[nodiscard]]
    schedule_operation schedule() noexcept;

  private:

    // Unspecified

  };
}

Example usage: Simple

cppcoro::task<std::string> do_something_on_threadpool(cppcoro::static_thread_pool& tp)
{
  // First schedule the coroutine onto the threadpool.
  co_await tp.schedule();

  // When it resumes, this coroutine is now running on the threadpool.
  do_something();
}

Example usage: Doing things in parallel - using schedule_on() operator with static_thread_pool.

cppcoro::task<double> dot_product(static_thread_pool& tp, double a[], double b[], size_t count)
{
  if (count > 1000)
  {
    // Subdivide the work recursively into two equal tasks
    // The first half is scheduled to the thread pool so it can run concurrently
    // with the second half which continues on this thread.
    size_t halfCount = count / 2;
    auto [first, second] = co_await when_all(
      schedule_on(tp, dot_product(tp, a, b, halfCount),
      dot_product(tp, a + halfCount, b + halfCount, count - halfCount));
    co_return first + second;
  }
  else
  {
    double sum = 0.0;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < count; ++i)
    {
      sum += a[i] * b[i];
    }
    co_return sum;
  }
}

io_service

The io_service class provides an abstraction for processing I/O completion events from asynchronous I/O operations.

When an asynchronous I/O operation completes, the coroutine that was awaiting that operation will be resumed on an I/O thread inside a call to one of the event-processing methods: process_events(), process_pending_events(), process_one_event() or process_one_pending_event().

The io_service class does not manage any I/O threads. You must ensure that some thread calls one of the event-processing methods for coroutines awaiting I/O completion events to be dispatched. This can either be a dedicated thread that calls process_events() or mixed in with some other event loop (e.g. a UI event loop) by periodically polling for new events via a call to process_pending_events() or process_one_pending_event().

This allows integration of the io_service event-loop with other event loops, such as a user-interface event loop.

You can multiplex processing of events across multiple threads by having multiple threads call process_events(). You can specify a hint as to the maximum number of threads to have actively processing events via an optional io_service constructor parameter.

On Windows, the implementation makes use of the Windows I/O Completion Port facility to dispatch events to I/O threads in a scalable manner.

API Summary:

namespace cppcoro
{
  class io_service
  {
  public:

    class schedule_operation;
    class timed_schedule_operation;

    io_service();
    io_service(std::uint32_t concurrencyHint);

    io_service(io_service&&) = delete;
    io_service(const io_service&) = delete;
    io_service& operator=(io_service&&) = delete;
    io_service& operator=(const io_service&) = delete;

    ~io_service();

    // Scheduler methods

    [[nodiscard]]
    schedule_operation schedule() noexcept;

    template<typename REP, typename RATIO>
    [[nodiscard]]
    timed_schedule_operation schedule_after(
      std::chrono::duration<REP, RATIO> delay,
      cppcoro::cancellation_token cancellationToken = {}) noexcept;

    // Event-loop methods
    //
    // I/O threads must call these to process I/O events and execute
    // scheduled coroutines.

    std::uint64_t process_events();
    std::uint64_t process_pending_events();
    std::uint64_t process_one_event();
    std::uint64_t process_one_pending_event();

    // Request that all threads processing events exit their event loops.
    void stop() noexcept;

    // Query if some thread has called stop()
    bool is_stop_requested() const noexcept;

    // Reset the event-loop after a call to stop() so that threads can
    // start processing events again.
    void reset();

    // Reference-counting methods for tracking outstanding references
    // to the io_service.
    //
    // The io_service::stop() method will be called when the last work
    // reference is decremented.
    //
    // Use the io_work_scope RAII class to manage calling these methods on
    // entry-to and exit-from a scope.
    void notify_work_started() noexcept;
    void notify_work_finished() noexcept;

  };

  class io_service::schedule_operation
  {
  public:
    schedule_operation(const schedule_operation&) noexcept;
    schedule_operation& operator=(const schedule_operation&) noexcept;

    bool await_ready() const noexcept;
    void await_suspend(std::experimental::coroutine_handle<> awaiter) noexcept;
    void await_resume() noexcept;
  };

  class io_service::timed_schedule_operation
  {
  public:
    timed_schedule_operation(timed_schedule_operation&&) noexcept;

    timed_schedule_operation(const timed_schedule_operation&) = delete;
    timed_schedule_operation& operator=(const timed_schedule_operation&) = delete;
    timed_schedule_operation& operator=(timed_schedule_operation&&) = delete;

    bool await_ready() const noexcept;
    void await_suspend(std::experimental::coroutine_handle<> awaiter);
    void await_resume();
  };

  class io_work_scope
  {
  public:

    io_work_scope(io_service& ioService) noexcept;

    io_work_scope(const io_work_scope& other) noexcept;
    io_work_scope(io_work_scope&& other) noexcept;

    ~io_work_scope();

    io_work_scope& operator=(const io_work_scope& other) noexcept;
    io_work_scope& operator=(io_work_scope&& other) noexcept;

    io_service& service() const noexcept;
  };

}

Example:

#include <cppcoro/task.hpp>
#include <cppcoro/task.hpp>
#include <cppcoro/io_service.hpp>
#include <cppcoro/read_only_file.hpp>

#include <experimental/filesystem>
#include <memory>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

namespace fs = std::experimental::filesystem;

cppcoro::task<std::uint64_t> count_lines(cppcoro::io_service& ioService, fs::path path)
{
  auto file = cppcoro::read_only_file::open(ioService, path);

  constexpr size_t bufferSize = 4096;
  auto buffer = std::make_unique<std::uint8_t[]>(bufferSize);

  std::uint64_t newlineCount = 0;

  for (std::uint64_t offset = 0, fileSize = file.size(); offset < fileSize;)
  {
    const auto bytesToRead = static_cast<size_t>(
      std::min<std::uint64_t>(bufferSize, fileSize - offset));

    const auto bytesRead = co_await file.read(offset, buffer.get(), bytesToRead);

    newlineCount += std::count(buffer.get(), buffer.get() + bytesRead, '\n');

    offset += bytesRead;
  }

  co_return newlineCount;
}

cppcoro::task<> run(cppcoro::io_service& ioService)
{
  cppcoro::io_work_scope ioScope(ioService);

  auto lineCount = co_await count_lines(ioService, fs::path{"foo.txt"});

  std::cout << "foo.txt has " << lineCount << " lines." << std::endl;;
}

cppcoro::task<> process_events(cppcoro::io_service& ioService)
{
  // Process events until the io_service is stopped.
  // ie. when the last io_work_scope goes out of scope.
  ioService.process_events();
  co_return;
}

int main()
{
  cppcoro::io_service ioService;

  cppcoro::sync_wait(cppcoro::when_all_ready(
    run(ioService),
    process_events(ioService)));

  return 0;
}

io_service as a scheduler

An io_sevice class implements the interfaces for the Scheduler and DelayedScheduler concepts.

This allows a coroutine to suspend execution on the current thread and schedule itself for resumption on an I/O thread associated with a particular io_service object.

Example:

cppcoro::task<> do_something(cppcoro::io_service& ioService)
{
  // Coroutine starts execution on the thread of the task awaiter.

  // A coroutine can transfer execution to an I/O thread by awaiting the
  // result of io_service::schedule().
  co_await ioService.schedule();

  // At this point, the coroutine is now executing on an I/O thread
  // inside a call to one of the io_service event processing methods.

  // A coroutine can also perform a delayed-schedule that will suspend
  // the coroutine for a specified duration of time before scheduling
  // it for resumption on an I/O thread.
  co_await ioService.schedule_after(100ms);

  // At this point, the coroutine is executing on a potentially different I/O thread.
}

file, readable_file, writable_file

These types are abstract base-classes for performing concrete file I/O.

API Summary:

namespace cppcoro
{
  class file_read_operation;
  class file_write_operation;

  class file
  {
  public:

    virtual ~file();

    std::uint64_t size() const;

  protected:

    file(file&& other) noexcept;

  };

  class readable_file : public virtual file
  {
  public:

    [[nodiscard]]
    file_read_operation read(
      std::uint64_t offset,
      void* buffer,
      std::size_t byteCount,
      cancellation_token ct = {}) const noexcept;

  };

  class writable_file : public virtual file
  {
  public:

    void set_size(std::uint64_t fileSize);

    [[nodiscard]]
    file_write_operation write(
      std::uint64_t offset,
      const void* buffer,
      std::size_t byteCount,
      cancellation_token ct = {}) noexcept;

  };

  class file_read_operation
  {
  public:

    file_read_operation(file_read_operation&& other) noexcept;

    bool await_ready() const noexcept;
    bool await_suspend(std::experimental::coroutine_handle<> awaiter);
    std::size_t await_resume();

  };

  class file_write_operation
  {
  public:

    file_write_operation(file_write_operation&& other) noexcept;

    bool await_ready() const noexcept;
    bool await_suspend(std::experimental::coroutine_handle<> awaiter);
    std::size_t await_resume();

  };
}

read_only_file, write_only_file, read_write_file

These types represent concrete file I/O classes.

API Summary:

namespace cppcoro
{
  class read_only_file : public readable_file
  {
  public:

    [[nodiscard]]
    static read_only_file open(
      io_service& ioService,
      const std::experimental::filesystem::path& path,
      file_share_mode shareMode = file_share_mode::read,
      file_buffering_mode bufferingMode = file_buffering_mode::default_);

  };

  class write_only_file : public writable_file
  {
  public:

    [[nodiscard]]
    static write_only_file open(
      io_service& ioService,
      const std::experimental::filesystem::path& path,
      file_open_mode openMode = file_open_mode::create_or_open,
      file_share_mode shareMode = file_share_mode::none,
      file_buffering_mode bufferingMode = file_buffering_mode::default_);

  };

  class read_write_file : public readable_file, public writable_file
  {
  public:

    [[nodiscard]]
    static read_write_file open(
      io_service& ioService,
      const std::experimental::filesystem::path& path,
      file_open_mode openMode = file_open_mode::create_or_open,
      file_share_mode shareMode = file_share_mode::none,
      file_buffering_mode bufferingMode = file_buffering_mode::default_);

  };
}

All open() functions throw std::system_error on failure.

Networking

NOTE: Networking abstractions are currently only supported on the Windows platform. Linux support will be coming soon.

socket

The socket class can be used to send/receive data over the network asynchronously.

Currently only supports TCP/IP, UDP/IP over IPv4 and IPv6.

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/net/socket.hpp>
namespace cppcoro::net
{
  class socket
  {
  public:

    static socket create_tcpv4(ip_service& ioSvc);
    static socket create_tcpv6(ip_service& ioSvc);
    static socket create_updv4(ip_service& ioSvc);
    static socket create_udpv6(ip_service& ioSvc);

    socket(socket&& other) noexcept;

    ~socket();

    socket& operator=(socket&& other) noexcept;

    // Return the native socket handle for the socket
    <platform-specific> native_handle() noexcept;

    const ip_endpoint& local_endpoint() const noexcept;
    const ip_endpoint& remote_endpoint() const noexcept;

    void bind(const ip_endpoint& localEndPoint);

    void listen();

    [[nodiscard]]
    Awaitable<void> connect(const ip_endpoint& remoteEndPoint) noexcept;
    [[nodiscard]]
    Awaitable<void> connect(const ip_endpoint& remoteEndPoint,
                            cancellation_token ct) noexcept;

    [[nodiscard]]
    Awaitable<void> accept(socket& acceptingSocket) noexcept;
    [[nodiscard]]
    Awaitable<void> accept(socket& acceptingSocket,
                           cancellation_token ct) noexcept;

    [[nodiscard]]
    Awaitable<void> disconnect() noexcep0t;
    [[nodiscard]]
    Awaitable<void> disconnect(cancellation_token ct) noexcept;

    [[nodiscard]]
    Awaitable<std::size_t> send(const void* buffer, std::size_t size) noexcept;
    [[nodiscard]]
    Awaitable<std::size_t> send(const void* buffer,
                                std::size_t size,
                                cancellation_token ct) noexcept;

    [[nodiscard]]
    Awaitable<std::size_t> recv(void* buffer, std::size_t size) noexcept;
    [[nodiscard]]
    Awaitable<std::size_t> recv(void* buffer,
                                std::size_t size,
                                cancellation_token ct) noexcept;

    [[nodiscard]]
    socket_recv_from_operation recv_from(
        void* buffer,
        std::size_t size) noexcept;
    [[nodiscard]]
    socket_recv_from_operation_cancellable recv_from(
        void* buffer,
        std::size_t size,
        cancellation_token ct) noexcept;

    [[nodiscard]]
    socket_send_to_operation send_to(
        const ip_endpoint& destination,
        const void* buffer,
        std::size_t size) noexcept;
    [[nodiscard]]
    socket_send_to_operation_cancellable send_to(
        const ip_endpoint& destination,
        const void* buffer,
        std::size_t size,
        cancellation_token ct) noexcept;

    void close_send();
    void close_recv();

  };
}

Example: Echo Server

#include <cppcoro/net/socket.hpp>
#include <cppcoro/io_service.hpp>
#include <cppcoro/cancellation_source.hpp>
#include <cppcoro/async_scope.hpp>
#include <cppcoro/on_scope_exit.hpp>

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

cppcoro::task<void> handle_connection(socket s)
{
  try
  {
    const size_t bufferSize = 16384;
    auto buffer = std::make_unique<unsigned char[]>(bufferSize);
    size_t bytesRead;
    do {
      // Read some bytes
      bytesRead = co_await s.recv(buffer.get(), bufferSize);

      // Write some bytes
      size_t bytesWritten = 0;
      while (bytesWritten < bytesRead) {
        bytesWritten += co_await s.send(
          buffer.get() + bytesWritten,
          bytesRead - bytesWritten);
      }
    } while (bytesRead != 0);

    s.close_send();

    co_await s.disconnect();
  }
  catch (...)
  {
    std::cout << "connection failed" << std::
  }
}

cppcoro::task<void> echo_server(
  cppcoro::net::ipv4_endpoint endpoint,
  cppcoro::io_service& ioSvc,
  cancellation_token ct)
{
  cppcoro::async_scope scope;

  std::exception_ptr ex;
  try
  {
    auto listeningSocket = cppcoro::net::socket::create_tcpv4(ioSvc);
    listeningSocket.bind(endpoint);
    listeningSocket.listen();

    while (true) {
      auto connection = cppcoro::net::socket::create_tcpv4(ioSvc);
      co_await listeningSocket.accept(connection, ct);
      scope.spawn(handle_connection(std::move(connection)));
    }
  }
  catch (cppcoro::operation_cancelled)
  {
  }
  catch (...)
  {
    ex = std::current_exception();
  }

  // Wait until all handle_connection tasks have finished.
  co_await scope.join();

  if (ex) std::rethrow_exception(ex);
}

int main(int argc, const char* argv[])
{
    cppcoro::io_service ioSvc;

    if (argc != 2) return -1;

    auto endpoint = cppcoro::ipv4_endpoint::from_string(argv[1]);
    if (!endpoint) return -1;

    (void)cppcoro::sync_wait(cppcoro::when_all(
        [&]() -> task<>
        {
            // Shutdown the event loop once finished.
            auto stopOnExit = cppcoro::on_scope_exit([&] { ioSvc.stop(); });

            cppcoro::cancellation_source canceller;
            co_await cppcoro::when_all(
                [&]() -> task<>
                {
                    // Run for 30s then stop accepting new connections.
                    co_await ioSvc.schedule_after(std::chrono::seconds(30));
                    canceller.request_cancellation();
                }(),
                echo_server(*endpoint, ioSvc, canceller.token()));
        }(),
        [&]() -> task<>
        {
            ioSvc.process_events();
        }()));

    return 0;
}

ip_address, ipv4_address, ipv6_address

Helper classes for representing an IP address.

API Synopsis:

namespace cppcoro::net
{
  class ipv4_address
  {
    using bytes_t = std::uint8_t[4];
  public:
    constexpr ipv4_address();
    explicit constexpr ipv4_address(std::uint32_t integer);
    explicit constexpr ipv4_address(const std::uint8_t(&bytes)[4]);
    explicit constexpr ipv4_address(std::uint8_t b0,
                                    std::uint8_t b1,
                                    std::uint8_t b2,
                                    std::uint8_t b3);

    constexpr const bytes_t& bytes() const;

    cosntexpr std::uint32_t to_integer() const;

    static constexpr ipv4_address loopback();

    constexpr bool is_loopback() const;
    constexpr bool is_private_network() const;

    constexpr bool operator==(ipv4_address other) const;
    constexpr bool operator!=(ipv4_address other) const;
    constexpr bool operator<(ipv4_address other) const;
    constexpr bool operator>(ipv4_address other) const;
    constexpr bool operator<=(ipv4_address other) const;
    constexpr bool operator>=(ipv4_address other) const;

    std::string to_string();

    static std::optional<ipv4_address> from_string(std::string_view string) noexcept;
  };

  class ipv6_address
  {
    using bytes_t = std::uint8_t[16];
  public:
    constexpr ipv6_address();

    explicit constexpr ipv6_address(
      std::uint64_t subnetPrefix,
      std::uint64_t interfaceIdentifier);

    constexpr ipv6_address(
      std::uint16_t part0,
      std::uint16_t part1,
      std::uint16_t part2,
      std::uint16_t part3,
      std::uint16_t part4,
      std::uint16_t part5,
      std::uint16_t part6,
      std::uint16_t part7);

    explicit constexpr ipv6_address(
        const std::uint16_t(&parts)[8]);

    explicit constexpr ipv6_address(
        const std::uint8_t(bytes)[16]);

    constexpr const bytes_t& bytes() const;

    constexpr std::uint64_t subnet_prefix() const;
    constexpr std::uint64_t interface_identifier() const;

    static constexpr ipv6_address unspecified();
    static constexpr ipv6_address loopback();

    static std::optional<ipv6_address> from_string(std::string_view string) noexcept;

    std::string to_string() const;

    constexpr bool operator==(const ipv6_address& other) const;
    constexpr bool operator!=(const ipv6_address& other) const;
    constexpr bool operator<(const ipv6_address& other) const;
    constexpr bool operator>(const ipv6_address& other) const;
    constexpr bool operator<=(const ipv6_address& other) const;
    constexpr bool operator>=(const ipv6_address& other) const;

  };

  class ip_address
  {
  public:

    // Constructs to IPv4 address 0.0.0.0
    ip_address() noexcept;

    ip_address(ipv4_address address) noexcept;
    ip_address(ipv6_address address) noexcept;

    bool is_ipv4() const noexcept;
    bool is_ipv6() const noexcept;

    const ipv4_address& to_ipv4() const;
    const ipv6_address& to_ipv6() const;

    const std::uint8_t* bytes() const noexcept;

    std::string to_string() const;

    static std::optional<ip_address> from_string(std::string_view string) noexcept;

    bool operator==(const ip_address& rhs) const noexcept;
    bool operator!=(const ip_address& rhs) const noexcept;

    //  ipv4_address sorts less than ipv6_address
    bool operator<(const ip_address& rhs) const noexcept;
    bool operator>(const ip_address& rhs) const noexcept;
    bool operator<=(const ip_address& rhs) const noexcept;
    bool operator>=(const ip_address& rhs) const noexcept;

  };
}

ip_endpoint, ipv4_endpoint ipv6_endpoint

Helper classes for representing an IP address and port-number.

API Synopsis:

namespace cppcoro::net
{
  class ipv4_endpoint
  {
  public:
    ipv4_endpoint() noexcept;
    explicit ipv4_endpoint(ipv4_address address, std::uint16_t port = 0) noexcept;

    const ipv4_address& address() const noexcept;
    std::uint16_t port() const noexcept;

    std::string to_string() const;
    static std::optional<ipv4_endpoint> from_string(std::string_view string) noexcept;
  };

  bool operator==(const ipv4_endpoint& a, const ipv4_endpoint& b);
  bool operator!=(const ipv4_endpoint& a, const ipv4_endpoint& b);
  bool operator<(const ipv4_endpoint& a, const ipv4_endpoint& b);
  bool operator>(const ipv4_endpoint& a, const ipv4_endpoint& b);
  bool operator<=(const ipv4_endpoint& a, const ipv4_endpoint& b);
  bool operator>=(const ipv4_endpoint& a, const ipv4_endpoint& b);

  class ipv6_endpoint
  {
  public:
    ipv6_endpoint() noexcept;
    explicit ipv6_endpoint(ipv6_address address, std::uint16_t port = 0) noexcept;

    const ipv6_address& address() const noexcept;
    std::uint16_t port() const noexcept;

    std::string to_string() const;
    static std::optional<ipv6_endpoint> from_string(std::string_view string) noexcept;
  };

  bool operator==(const ipv6_endpoint& a, const ipv6_endpoint& b);
  bool operator!=(const ipv6_endpoint& a, const ipv6_endpoint& b);
  bool operator<(const ipv6_endpoint& a, const ipv6_endpoint& b);
  bool operator>(const ipv6_endpoint& a, const ipv6_endpoint& b);
  bool operator<=(const ipv6_endpoint& a, const ipv6_endpoint& b);
  bool operator>=(const ipv6_endpoint& a, const ipv6_endpoint& b);

  class ip_endpoint
  {
  public:
     // Constructs to IPv4 end-point 0.0.0.0:0
     ip_endpoint() noexcept;

     ip_endpoint(ipv4_endpoint endpoint) noexcept;
     ip_endpoint(ipv6_endpoint endpoint) noexcept;

     bool is_ipv4() const noexcept;
     bool is_ipv6() const noexcept;

     const ipv4_endpoint& to_ipv4() const;
     const ipv6_endpoint& to_ipv6() const;

     ip_address address() const noexcept;
     std::uint16_t port() const noexcept;

     std::string to_string() const;

     static std::optional<ip_endpoint> from_string(std::string_view string) noexcept;

     bool operator==(const ip_endpoint& rhs) const noexcept;
     bool operator!=(const ip_endpoint& rhs) const noexcept;

     //  ipv4_endpoint sorts less than ipv6_endpoint
     bool operator<(const ip_endpoint& rhs) const noexcept;
     bool operator>(const ip_endpoint& rhs) const noexcept;
     bool operator<=(const ip_endpoint& rhs) const noexcept;
     bool operator>=(const ip_endpoint& rhs) const noexcept;
  };
}

Functions

sync_wait()

The sync_wait()function can be used to synchronously wait until the specified awaitable completes.

The specified awaitable will be co_awaited on current thread inside a newly created coroutine.

The sync_wait() call will block until the operation completes and will return the result of the co_await expression or rethrow the exception if the co_await expression completed with an unhandled exception.

The sync_wait() function is mostly useful for starting a top-level task from within main() and waiting until the task finishes, in practise it is the only way to start the first/top-level task.

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/sync_wait.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  template<typename AWAITABLE>
  auto sync_wait(AWAITABLE&& awaitable)
    -> typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLE&&>::await_result_t;
}

Examples:

void example_task()
{
  auto makeTask = []() -> task<std::string>
  {
    co_return "foo";
  };

  auto task = makeTask();

  // start the lazy task and wait until it completes
  sync_wait(task); // -> "foo"
  sync_wait(makeTask()); // -> "foo"
}

void example_shared_task()
{
  auto makeTask = []() -> shared_task<std::string>
  {
    co_return "foo";
  };

  auto task = makeTask();
  // start the shared task and wait until it completes
  sync_wait(task) == "foo";
  sync_wait(makeTask()) == "foo";
}

when_all_ready()

The when_all_ready() function can be used to create a new awaitable that completes when all of the input awaitables complete.

Input tasks can be any type of awaitable.

When the returned awaitable is co_awaited it will co_await each of the input awaitables in turn on the awaiting thread in the order they are passed to the when_all_ready() function. If these tasks to not complete synchronously then they will execute concurrently.

Once all of the co_await expressions on input awaitables have run to completion the returned awaitable will complete and resume the awaiting coroutine. The awaiting coroutine will be resumed on the thread of the input awaitable that is last to complete.

The returned awaitable is guaranteed not to throw an exception when co_awaited, even if some of the input awaitables fail with an unhandled exception.

Note, however, that the when_all_ready() call itself may throw std::bad_alloc if it was unable to allocate memory for the coroutine frames required to await each of the input awaitables. It may also throw an exception if any of the input awaitable objects throw from their copy/move constructors.

The result of co_awaiting the returned awaitable is a std::tuple or std::vector of when_all_task<RESULT> objects. These objects allow you to obtain the result (or exception) of each input awaitable separately by calling the when_all_task<RESULT>::result() method of the corresponding output task. This allows the caller to concurrently await multiple awaitables and synchronise on their completion while still retaining the ability to subsequently inspect the results of each of the co_await operations for success/failure.

This differs from when_all() where the failure of any individual co_await operation causes the overall operation to fail with an exception. This means you cannot determine which of the component co_await operations failed and also prevents you from obtaining the results of the other co_await operations.

API summary:

// <cppcoro/when_all_ready.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  // Concurrently await multiple awaitables.
  //
  // Returns an awaitable object that, when co_await'ed, will co_await each of the input
  // awaitable objects and will resume the awaiting coroutine only when all of the
  // component co_await operations complete.
  //
  // Result of co_await'ing the returned awaitable is a std::tuple of detail::when_all_task<T>,
  // one for each input awaitable and where T is the result-type of the co_await expression
  // on the corresponding awaitable.
  //
  // AWAITABLES must be awaitable types and must be movable (if passed as rvalue) or copyable
  // (if passed as lvalue). The co_await expression will be executed on an rvalue of the
  // copied awaitable.
  template<typename... AWAITABLES>
  auto when_all_ready(AWAITABLES&&... awaitables)
    -> Awaitable<std::tuple<detail::when_all_task<typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLES>::await_result_t>...>>;

  // Concurrently await each awaitable in a vector of input awaitables.
  template<
    typename AWAITABLE,
    typename RESULT = typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLE>::await_result_t>
  auto when_all_ready(std::vector<AWAITABLE> awaitables)
    -> Awaitable<std::vector<detail::when_all_task<RESULT>>>;
}

Example usage:

task<std::string> get_record(int id);

task<> example1()
{
  // Run 3 get_record() operations concurrently and wait until they're all ready.
  // Returns a std::tuple of tasks that can be unpacked using structured bindings.
  auto [task1, task2, task3] = co_await when_all_ready(
    get_record(123),
    get_record(456),
    get_record(789));

  // Unpack the result of each task
  std::string& record1 = task1.result();
  std::string& record2 = task2.result();
  std::string& record3 = task3.result();

  // Use records....
}

task<> example2()
{
  // Create the input tasks. They don't start executing yet.
  std::vector<task<std::string>> tasks;
  for (int i = 0; i < 1000; ++i)
  {
    tasks.emplace_back(get_record(i));
  }

  // Execute all tasks concurrently.
  std::vector<detail::when_all_task<std::string>> resultTasks =
    co_await when_all_ready(std::move(tasks));

  // Unpack and handle each result individually once they're all complete.
  for (int i = 0; i < 1000; ++i)
  {
    try
    {
      std::string& record = tasks[i].result();
      std::cout << i << " = " << record << std::endl;
    }
    catch (const std::exception& ex)
    {
      std::cout << i << " : " << ex.what() << std::endl;
    }
  }
}

when_all()

The when_all() function can be used to create a new Awaitable that when co_awaited will co_await each of the input awaitables concurrently and return an aggregate of their individual results.

When the returned awaitable is awaited, it will co_await each of the input awaitables on the current thread. Once the first awaitable suspends, the second task will be started, and so on. The operations execute concurrently until they have all run to completion.

Once all component co_await operations have run to completion, an aggregate of the results is constructed from each individual result. If an exception is thrown by any of the input tasks or if the construction of the aggregate result throws an exception then the exception will propagate out of the co_await of the returned awaitable.

If multiple co_await operations fail with an exception then one of the exceptions will propagate out of the co_await when_all() expression the other exceptions will be silently ignored. It is not specified which operation's exception will be chosen.

If it is important to know which component co_await operation failed or to retain the ability to obtain results of other operations even if some of them fail then you you should use when_all_ready() instead.

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/when_all.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  // Variadic version.
  //
  // Note that if the result of `co_await awaitable` yields a void-type
  // for some awaitables then the corresponding component for that awaitable
  // in the tuple will be an empty struct of type detail::void_value.
  template<typename... AWAITABLES>
  auto when_all(AWAITABLES&&... awaitables)
    -> Awaitable<std::tuple<typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLES>::await_result_t...>>;

  // Overload for vector<Awaitable<void>>.
  template<
    typename AWAITABLE,
    typename RESULT = typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLE>::await_result_t,
    std::enable_if_t<std::is_void_v<RESULT>, int> = 0>
  auto when_all(std::vector<AWAITABLE> awaitables)
    -> Awaitable<void>;

  // Overload for vector<Awaitable<NonVoid>> that yield a value when awaited.
  template<
    typename AWAITABLE,
    typename RESULT = typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLE>::await_result_t,
    std::enable_if_t<!std::is_void_v<RESULT>, int> = 0>
  auto when_all(std::vector<AWAITABLE> awaitables)
    -> Awaitable<std::vector<std::conditional_t<
         std::is_lvalue_reference_v<RESULT>,
         std::reference_wrapper<std::remove_reference_t<RESULT>>,
         std::remove_reference_t<RESULT>>>>;
}

Examples:

task<A> get_a();
task<B> get_b();

task<> example1()
{
  // Run get_a() and get_b() concurrently.
  // Task yields a std::tuple<A, B> which can be unpacked using structured bindings.
  auto [a, b] = co_await when_all(get_a(), get_b());

  // use a, b
}

task<std::string> get_record(int id);

task<> example2()
{
  std::vector<task<std::string>> tasks;
  for (int i = 0; i < 1000; ++i)
  {
    tasks.emplace_back(get_record(i));
  }

  // Concurrently execute all get_record() tasks.
  // If any of them fail with an exception then the exception will propagate
  // out of the co_await expression once they have all completed.
  std::vector<std::string> records = co_await when_all(std::move(tasks));

  // Process results
  for (int i = 0; i < 1000; ++i)
  {
    std::cout << i << " = " << records[i] << std::endl;
  }
}

fmap()

The fmap() function can be used to apply a callable function to the value(s) contained within a container-type, returning a new container-type of the results of applying the function the contained value(s).

The fmap() function can apply a function to values of type generator<T>, recursive_generator<T> and async_generator<T> as well as any value that supports the Awaitable concept (eg. task<T>).

Each of these types provides an overload for fmap() that takes two arguments; a function to apply and the container value. See documentation for each type for the supported fmap() overloads.

For example, the fmap() function can be used to apply a function to the eventual result of a task<T>, producing a new task<U> that will complete with the return-value of the function.

// Given a function you want to apply that converts
// a value of type A to value of type B.
B a_to_b(A value);

// And a task that yields a value of type A
cppcoro::task<A> get_an_a();

// We can apply the function to the result of the task using fmap()
// and obtain a new task yielding the result.
cppcoro::task<B> bTask = fmap(a_to_b, get_an_a());

// An alternative syntax is to use the pipe notation.
cppcoro::task<B> bTask = get_an_a() | cppcoro::fmap(a_to_b);

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/fmap.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  template<typename FUNC>
  struct fmap_transform
  {
    fmap_transform(FUNC&& func) noexcept(std::is_nothrow_move_constructible_v<FUNC>);
    FUNC func;
  };

  // Type-deducing constructor for fmap_transform object that can be used
  // in conjunction with operator|.
  template<typename FUNC>
  fmap_transform<FUNC> fmap(FUNC&& func);

  // operator| overloads for providing pipe-based syntactic sugar for fmap()
  // such that the expression:
  //   <value-expr> | cppcoro::fmap(<func-expr>)
  // is equivalent to:
  //   fmap(<func-expr>, <value-expr>)

  template<typename T, typename FUNC>
  decltype(auto) operator|(T&& value, fmap_transform<FUNC>&& transform);

  template<typename T, typename FUNC>
  decltype(auto) operator|(T&& value, fmap_transform<FUNC>& transform);

  template<typename T, typename FUNC>
  decltype(auto) operator|(T&& value, const fmap_transform<FUNC>& transform);

  // Generic overload for all awaitable types.
  //
  // Returns an awaitable that when co_awaited, co_awaits the specified awaitable
  // and applies the specified func to the result of the 'co_await awaitable'
  // expression as if by 'std::invoke(func, co_await awaitable)'.
  //
  // If the type of 'co_await awaitable' expression is 'void' then co_awaiting the
  // returned awaitable is equivalent to 'co_await awaitable, func()'.
  template<
    typename FUNC,
    typename AWAITABLE,
    std::enable_if_t<is_awaitable_v<AWAITABLE>, int> = 0>
  auto fmap(FUNC&& func, AWAITABLE&& awaitable)
    -> Awaitable<std::invoke_result_t<FUNC, typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLE>::await_result_t>>;
}

The fmap() function is designed to look up the correct overload by argument-dependent lookup (ADL) so it should generally be called without the cppcoro:: prefix.

resume_on()

The resume_on() function can be used to control the execution context that an awaitable will resume the awaiting coroutine on when awaited. When applied to an async_generator it controls which execution context the co_await g.begin() and co_await ++it operations resume the awaiting coroutines on.

Normally, the awaiting coroutine of an awaitable (eg. a task) or async_generator will resume execution on whatever thread the operation completed on. In some cases this may not be the thread that you want to continue executing on. In these cases you can use the resume_on() function to create a new awaitable or generator that will resume execution on a thread associated with a specified scheduler.

The resume_on() function can be used either as a normal function returning a new awaitable/generator. Or it can be used in a pipeline-syntax.

Example:

task<record> load_record(int id);

ui_thread_scheduler uiThreadScheduler;

task<> example()
{
  // This will start load_record() on the current thread.
  // Then when load_record() completes (probably on an I/O thread)
  // it will reschedule execution onto thread pool and call to_json
  // Once to_json completes it will transfer execution onto the
  // ui thread before resuming this coroutine and returning the json text.
  task<std::string> jsonTask =
    load_record(123)
    | cppcoro::resume_on(threadpool::default())
    | cppcoro::fmap(to_json)
    | cppcoro::resume_on(uiThreadScheduler);

  // At this point, all we've done is create a pipeline of tasks.
  // The tasks haven't started executing yet.

  // Await the result. Starts the pipeline of tasks.
  std::string jsonText = co_await jsonTask;

  // Guaranteed to be executing on ui thread here.

  someUiControl.set_text(jsonText);
}

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/resume_on.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  template<typename SCHEDULER, typename AWAITABLE>
  auto resume_on(SCHEDULER& scheduler, AWAITABLE awaitable)
    -> Awaitable<typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLE>::await_traits_t>;

  template<typename SCHEDULER, typename T>
  async_generator<T> resume_on(SCHEDULER& scheduler, async_generator<T> source);

  template<typename SCHEDULER>
  struct resume_on_transform
  {
    explicit resume_on_transform(SCHEDULER& scheduler) noexcept;
    SCHEDULER& scheduler;
  };

  // Construct a transform/operation that can be applied to a source object
  // using "pipe" notation (ie. operator|).
  template<typename SCHEDULER>
  resume_on_transform<SCHEDULER> resume_on(SCHEDULER& scheduler) noexcept;

  // Equivalent to 'resume_on(transform.scheduler, std::forward<T>(value))'
  template<typename T, typename SCHEDULER>
  decltype(auto) operator|(T&& value, resume_on_transform<SCHEDULER> transform)
  {
    return resume_on(transform.scheduler, std::forward<T>(value));
  }
}

schedule_on()

The schedule_on() function can be used to change the execution context that a given awaitable or async_generator starts executing on.

When applied to an async_generator it also affects which execution context it resumes on after co_yield statement.

Note that the schedule_on transform does not specify the thread that the awaitable or async_generator will complete or yield results on, that is up to the implementation of the awaitable or generator.

See the resume_on() operator for a transform that controls the thread the operation completes on.

For example:

task<int> get_value();
io_service ioSvc;

task<> example()
{
  // Starts executing get_value() on the current thread.
  int a = co_await get_value();

  // Starts executing get_value() on a thread associated with ioSvc.
  int b = co_await schedule_on(ioSvc, get_value());
}

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/schedule_on.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  // Return a task that yields the same result as 't' but that
  // ensures that 't' is co_await'ed on a thread associated with
  // the specified scheduler. Resulting task will complete on
  // whatever thread 't' would normally complete on.
  template<typename SCHEDULER, typename AWAITABLE>
  auto schedule_on(SCHEDULER& scheduler, AWAITABLE awaitable)
    -> Awaitable<typename awaitable_traits<AWAITABLE>::await_result_t>;

  // Return a generator that yields the same sequence of results as
  // 'source' but that ensures that execution of the coroutine starts
  // execution on a thread associated with 'scheduler' and resumes
  // after a 'co_yield' on a thread associated with 'scheduler'.
  template<typename SCHEDULER, typename T>
  async_generator<T> schedule_on(SCHEDULER& scheduler, async_generator<T> source);

  template<typename SCHEDULER>
  struct schedule_on_transform
  {
    explicit schedule_on_transform(SCHEDULER& scheduler) noexcept;
    SCHEDULER& scheduler;
  };

  template<typename SCHEDULER>
  schedule_on_transform<SCHEDULER> schedule_on(SCHEDULER& scheduler) noexcept;

  template<typename T, typename SCHEDULER>
  decltype(auto) operator|(T&& value, schedule_on_transform<SCHEDULER> transform);
}

Metafunctions

awaitable_traits<T>

This template metafunction can be used to determine what the resulting type of a co_await expression will be if applied to an expression of type T.

Note that this assumes the value of type T is being awaited in a context where it is unaffected by any await_transform applied by the coroutine's promise object. The results may differ if a value of type T is awaited in such a context.

The awaitable_traits<T> template metafunction does not define the awaiter_t or await_result_t nested typedefs if type, T, is not awaitable. This allows its use in SFINAE contexts that disables overloads when T is not awaitable.

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/awaitable_traits.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  template<typename T>
  struct awaitable_traits
  {
    // The type that results from applying `operator co_await()` to a value
    // of type T, if T supports an `operator co_await()`, otherwise is type `T&&`.
    typename awaiter_t = <unspecified>;

    // The type of the result of co_await'ing a value of type T.
    typename await_result_t = <unspecified>;
  };
}

is_awaitable<T>

The is_awaitable<T> template metafunction allows you to query whether or not a given type can be co_awaited or not from within a coroutine.

API Summary:

// <cppcoro/is_awaitable.hpp>
namespace cppcoro
{
  template<typename T>
  struct is_awaitable : std::bool_constant<...>
  {};

  template<typename T>
  constexpr bool is_awaitable_v = is_awaitable<T>::value;
}

Concepts

Awaitable<T> concept

An Awaitable<T> is a concept that indicates that a type can be co_awaited in a coroutine context that has no await_transform overloads and that the result of the co_await expression has type, T.

For example, the type task<T> implements the concept Awaitable<T&&> whereas the type task<T>& implements the concept Awaitable<T&>.

Awaiter<T> concept

An Awaiter<T> is a concept that indicates a type contains the await_ready, await_suspend and await_resume methods required to implement the protocol for suspending/resuming an awaiting coroutine.

A type that satisfies Awaiter<T> must have, for an instance of the type, awaiter:

  • awaiter.await_ready() -> bool
  • awaiter.await_suspend(std::experimental::coroutine_handle<void>{}) -> void or bool or std::experimental::coroutine_handle<P> for some P.
  • awaiter.await_resume() -> T

Any type that implements the Awaiter<T> concept also implements the Awaitable<T> concept.

Scheduler concept

A Scheduler is a concept that allows scheduling execution of coroutines within some execution context.

concept Scheduler
{
  Awaitable<void> schedule();
}

Given a type, S, that implements the Scheduler concept, and an instance, s, of type S:

  • The s.schedule() method returns an awaitable-type such that co_await s.schedule() will unconditionally suspend the current coroutine and schedule it for resumption on the execution context associated with the scheduler, s.
  • The result of the co_await s.schedule() expression has type void.
cppcoro::task<> f(Scheduler& scheduler)
{
  // Execution of the coroutine is initially on the caller's execution context.

  // Suspends execution of the coroutine and schedules it for resumption on
  // the scheduler's execution context.
  co_await scheduler.schedule();

  // At this point the coroutine is now executing on the scheduler's
  // execution context.
}

DelayedScheduler concept

A DelayedScheduler is a concept that allows a coroutine to schedule itself for execution on the scheduler's execution context after a specified duration of time has elapsed.

concept DelayedScheduler : Scheduler
{
  template<typename REP, typename RATIO>
  Awaitable<void> schedule_after(std::chrono::duration<REP, RATIO> delay);

  template<typename REP, typename RATIO>
  Awaitable<void> schedule_after(
    std::chrono::duration<REP, RATIO> delay,
    cppcoro::cancellation_token cancellationToken);
}

Given a type, S, that implements the DelayedScheduler and an instance, s of type S:

  • The s.schedule_after(delay) method returns an object that can be awaited such that co_await s.schedule_after(delay) suspends the current coroutine for a duration of delay before scheduling the coroutine for resumption on the execution context associated with the scheduler, s.
  • The co_await s.schedule_after(delay) expression has type void.

Building

The cppcoro library supports building under Windows with Visual Studio 2017 and Linux with Clang 5.0+.

This library makes use of the Cake build system (no, not the C# one).

The cake build system is checked out automatically as a git submodule so you don't need to download or install it separately.

Building on Windows

This library currently requires Visual Studio 2017 or later and the Windows 10 SDK.

Support for Clang (#3) and Linux (#15) is planned.

Prerequisites

The Cake build-system is implemented in Python and requires Python 2.7 to be installed.

Ensure Python 2.7 interpreter is in your PATH and available as 'python'.

Ensure Visual Studio 2017 Update 3 or later is installed. Note that there are some known issues with coroutines in Update 2 or earlier that have been fixed in Update 3.

You can also use an experimental version of the Visual Studio compiler by downloading a NuGet package from https://vcppdogfooding.azurewebsites.net/ and unzipping the .nuget file to a directory. Just update the config.cake file to point at the unzipped location by modifying and uncommenting the following line:

nugetPath = None # r'C:\Path\To\VisualCppTools.14.0.25224-Pre'

Ensure that you have the Windows 10 SDK installed. It will use the latest Windows 10 SDK and Universal C Runtime version by default.

Cloning the repository

The cppcoro repository makes use of git submodules to pull in the source for the Cake build system.

This means you need to pass the --recursive flag to the git clone command. eg.

c:\Code> git clone --recursive https://github.com/lewissbaker/cppcoro.git

If you have already cloned cppcoro, then you should update the submodules after pulling changes.

c:\Code\cppcoro> git submodule update --init --recursive

Building from the command-line

To build from the command-line just run 'cake.bat' in the workspace root.

eg.

C:\cppcoro> cake.bat
Building with C:\cppcoro\config.cake - Variant(release='debug', platform='windows', architecture='x86', compilerFamily='msvc', compiler='msvc14.10')
Building with C:\cppcoro\config.cake - Variant(release='optimised', platform='windows', architecture='x64', compilerFamily='msvc', compiler='msvc14.10')
Building with C:\cppcoro\config.cake - Variant(release='debug', platform='windows', architecture='x64', compilerFamily='msvc', compiler='msvc14.10')
Building with C:\cppcoro\config.cake - Variant(release='optimised', platform='windows', architecture='x86', compilerFamily='msvc', compiler='msvc14.10')
Compiling test\main.cpp
Compiling test\main.cpp
Compiling test\main.cpp
Compiling test\main.cpp
...
Linking build\windows_x86_msvc14.10_debug\test\run.exe
Linking build\windows_x64_msvc14.10_optimised\test\run.exe
Linking build\windows_x86_msvc14.10_optimised\test\run.exe
Linking build\windows_x64_msvc14.10_debug\test\run.exe
Generating code
Finished generating code
Generating code
Finished generating code
Build succeeded.
Build took 0:00:02.419.

By default, running cake with no arguments will build all projects with all build variants and execute the unit-tests. You can narrow what is built by passing additional command-line arguments. eg.

c:\cppcoro> cake.bat release=debug architecture=x64 lib/build.cake
Building with C:\Users\Lewis\Code\cppcoro\config.cake - Variant(release='debug', platform='windows', architecture='x64', compilerFamily='msvc', compiler='msvc14.10')
Archiving build\windows_x64_msvc14.10_debug\lib\cppcoro.lib
Build succeeded.
Build took 0:00:00.321.

You can run cake --help to list available command-line options.

Building Visual Studio project files

To develop from within Visual Studio you can build .vcproj/.sln files by running cake.bat -p.

eg.

c:\cppcoro> cake.bat -p
Building with C:\cppcoro\config.cake - Variant(release='debug', platform='windows', architecture='x86', compilerFamily='msvc', compiler='msvc14.10')
Building with C:\cppcoro\config.cake - Variant(release='optimised', platform='windows', architecture='x64', compilerFamily='msvc', compiler='msvc14.10')
Building with C:\cppcoro\config.cake - Variant(release='debug', platform='windows', architecture='x64', compilerFamily='msvc', compiler='msvc14.10')
Building with C:\cppcoro\config.cake - Variant(release='optimised', platform='windows', architecture='x86', compilerFamily='msvc', compiler='msvc14.10')
Generating Solution build/project/cppcoro.sln
Generating Project build/project/cppcoro_tests.vcxproj
Generating Filters build/project/cppcoro_tests.vcxproj.filters
Generating Project build/project/cppcoro.vcxproj
Generating Filters build/project/cppcoro.vcxproj.filters
Build succeeded.
Build took 0:00:00.247.

When you build these projects from within Visual Studio it will call out to cake to perform the compilation.

Building on Linux

The cppcoro project can also be built under Linux using Clang + libc++ 5.0 or later.

Building cppcoro has been tested under Ubuntu 17.04.

Prerequisities

Ensure you have the following packages installed:

  • Python 2.7
  • Clang >= 5.0
  • LLD >= 5.0
  • libc++ >= 5.0

Building cppcoro

This is assuming you have Clang and libc++ built and installed.

If you don't have Clang configured yet, see the following sections for details on setting up Clang for building with cppcoro.

Checkout cppcoro and its submodules:

git clone --recursive https://github.com/lewissbaker/cppcoro.git cppcoro

Run init.sh to setup the cake bash function:

cd cppcoro
source init.sh

Then you can run cake from the workspace root to build cppcoro and run tests:

$ cake

You can specify additional command-line arguments to customise the build:

  • --help will print out help for command-line arguments
  • --debug=run will show the build command-lines being run
  • release=debug or release=optimised will limit the build variant to either debug or optimised (by default it will build both).
  • lib/build.cake will just build the cppcoro library and not the tests.
  • test/build.cake@task_tests.cpp will just compile a particular source file

For example:

$ cake --debug=run release=debug lib/build.cake

Customising location of Clang

If your clang compiler is not located at /usr/bin/clang then you need to modify the config.cake file to tell cake where to find clang.

Edit the following line in config.cake:

  # If you have built your own version of Clang, you can modify
  # this variable to point to the CMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX for
  # where you have installed your clang/libcxx build.
  clangInstallPrefix = '/usr'

If you have libc++ installed in a different location then you can customise its location by modifying the following line in config.cake.

  # Set this to the install-prefix of where libc++ is installed.
  # You only need to set this if it is not installed at the same
  # location as clangInstallPrefix.
  libCxxInstallPrefix = None # '/path/to/install'

If the install location has multiple versions of Clang installed and the one you want to use is not <install-prefix>/bin/clang then you can explicitly specify which one to use by modifying the config.cake file to specify the name of the clang binaries:

  compiler = ClangCompiler(
    configuration=configuration,
    clangExe=cake.path.join(clangBinPath, 'clang-6.0'),
    llvmArExe=cake.path.join(clangBinPath, 'llvm-ar-6.0'),
    binPaths=[clangBinPath])

Using a snapshot build of Clang

If your Linux distribution does not have a version of Clang 5.0 or later available, you can install a snapshot build from the LLVM project.

Follow instructions at http://apt.llvm.org/ to setup your package manager to support pulling from the LLVM package manager.

For example, for Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty:

Edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add the following lines:

deb http://apt.llvm.org/zesty/ llvm-toolchain-zesty main
deb-src http://apt.llvm.org/zesty/ llvm-toolchain-zesty main

Install the PGP key for those packages:

$ wget -O - https://apt.llvm.org/llvm-snapshot.gpg.key | sudo apt-key add -

Install Clang and LLD:

$ sudo apt-get install clang-6.0 lld-6.0

The LLVM snapshot builds do not include libc++ versions so you'll need to build that yourself. See below.

Building your own Clang

You can also use the bleeding-edge Clang version by building Clang from source yourself.

See instructions here:

To do this you will need to install the following pre-requisites:

$ sudo apt-get install git cmake ninja-build clang lld

Note that we are using your distribution's version of clang to build clang from source. GCC could also be used here instead.

Checkout LLVM + Clang + LLD + libc++ repositories:

mkdir llvm
cd llvm
git clone --depth=1 https://github.com/llvm-mirror/llvm.git llvm
git clone --depth=1 https://github.com/llvm-mirror/clang.git llvm/tools/clang
git clone --depth=1 https://github.com/llvm-mirror/lld.git llvm/tools/lld
git clone --depth=1 https://github.com/llvm-mirror/libcxx.git llvm/projects/libcxx
ln -s llvm/tools/clang clang
ln -s llvm/tools/lld lld
ln -s llvm/projects/libcxx libcxx

Configure and build Clang:

mkdir clang-build
cd clang-build
cmake -GNinja \
      -DCMAKE_CXX_COMPILER=/usr/bin/clang++ \
      -DCMAKE_C_COMPILER=/usr/bin/clang \
      -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=MinSizeRel \
      -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX="/path/to/clang/install"
      -DCMAKE_BUILD_WITH_INSTALL_RPATH="yes" \
      -DLLVM_TARGETS_TO_BUILD=X86 \
      -DLLVM_ENABLE_PROJECTS="lld;clang" \
      ../llvm
ninja install-clang \
      install-clang-headers \
      install-llvm-ar \
      install-lld

Building libc++

The cppcoro project requires libc++ as it contains the <experimental/coroutine> header required to use C++ coroutines under Clang.

Checkout libc++ + llvm:

mkdir llvm
cd llvm
git clone --depth=1 https://github.com/llvm-mirror/llvm.git llvm
git clone --depth=1 https://github.com/llvm-mirror/libcxx.git llvm/projects/libcxx
ln -s llvm/projects/libcxx libcxx

Build libc++:

mkdir libcxx-build
cd libcxx-build
cmake -GNinja \
      -DCMAKE_CXX_COMPILER="/path/to/clang/install/bin/clang++" \
      -DCMAKE_C_COMPILER="/path/to/clang/install/bin/clang" \
      -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=Release \
      -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX="/path/to/clang/install" \
      -DLLVM_PATH="../llvm" \
      -DLIBCXX_CXX_ABI=libstdc++ \
      -DLIBCXX_CXX_ABI_INCLUDE_PATHS="/usr/include/c++/6.3.0/;/usr/include/x86_64-linux-gnu/c++/6.3.0/" \
      ../libcxx
ninja cxx
ninja install

This will build and install libc++ into the same install directory where you have clang installed.

Support

GitHub issues are the primary mechanism for support, bug reports and feature requests.

Contributions are welcome and pull-requests will be happily reviewed. I only ask that you agree to license any contributions that you make under the MIT license.

If you have general questions about C++ coroutines, you can generally find someone to help in the #coroutines channel on Cpplang Slack group.