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// Copyright (c) The Libra Core Contributors
// SPDX-License-Identifier: Apache-2.0
// This file contains proto definitions for performing queries and getting back
// results with proofs. This is the interface for a client to query data from
// the system. Every query result must include proof so that a client can be
// certain that the data returned is valid. A client must verify this proof to
// ensure that a node isn't lying to them.
// How to verify the response as a client:
// (Note that every response comes in the form of GetWithProofResponse which
// wraps the inner response elements that correspond to the specific request
// types. Below we will assume a single request/response type. The
// verification can be extended as needed for multiple types. Also note that we
// will use the following notation: resp = GetWithProofResponse and req =
// GetWithProofRequest). Also note that the following will be considered
// equivalent for brevity: req.requested_items.get_account_state_request ==
// req.get_account_state_request And, resp.values.get_account_state_response ==
// resp.get_account_state_response
//
// GetAccountStateResponse:
// - let state_req = req.requested_items.get_account_state_request;
// - let state_resp = resp.values.get_account_state_response;
// - Verify that:
// - state_req.access_path == state_resp.access_path
// - This ensures that the server is responding with the correct access
// path
// - let state_data_hash = Hash(state_resp.value);
// - let state_proof = resp.values.proof.state_proof_value.sparse_merkle_proof;
// - Validate state_proof using state_data_hash as the leaf
// - When verifying the state tree, use:
// state_root_hash = resp.values.transaction_info.state_root_hash
// - Validate accumulator using resp.values.transaction_info as the leaf
// - When verifying the accumulator, use:
// root_hash =
// resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.ledger_info.ledger_info.txn_root_hash;
// - Validate that the transaction root hash submitted in
// req.known_value.node_value.txn_root_hash
// exists in the proof for accumulator and that the proof is valid with
// this hash
// - Validate ledger info
// - let ledger_info_hash =
// Hash(resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.ledger_info.ledger_info);
// - Verify signatures from resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.signatures are
// signing
// ledger_info_hash and that there are >2/3 nodes signing this
// correctly
// - Validate that the timestamp is relatively recent in
// resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.ledger_info.timestamp
//
//
// GetAccountTransactionBySequenceNumberResponse:
// - Note that other than type completed_transaction, there will be no proof
// returned
// since the transaction has not yet been committed. To ensure that a
// validator is telling the truth about it not being committed yet, a
// client should query for their account state and verify that their
// current sequence number is less than what they are searching for with
// GetAccountTransactionBySequenceNumberResponse
// - let txn =
// resp.get_account_transaction_by_sequence_number_response.transaction.committed_transaction;
// - let txn_hash = Hash(txn);
// - Verify that resp.proof.transaction_info.signed_transaction_hash == txn_hash
// - Validate accumulator using resp.proof.transaction_info as the leaf
// - When verifying the accumulator, use:
// root_hash =
// resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.ledger_info.ledger_info.txn_root_hash;
// - Validate that the transaction root hash submitted in
// req.known_value.node_value.txn_root_hash
// exists in the proof for accumulator and that the proof is valid with
// this hash
// - Validate ledger info
// - let ledger_info_hash =
// Hash(resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.ledger_info.ledger_info);
// - Verify signatures from resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.signatures are
// signing
// ledger_info_hash and that there are >2/3 nodes signing this
// correctly
// - Validate that the timestamp is relatively recent in
// resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.ledger_info.timestamp
//
//
// GetTransactionsResponse:
// - for txn in resp.get_transactions_response.transactions:
// - let txn = txn.committed_transaction;
// - let txn_hash = Hash(txn);
// - Verify that txn.proof.transaction_info.signed_transaction_hash ==
// txn_hash
// - Validate accumulator using txn.proof.transaction_info as the leaf
// - When verifying the accumulator, use:
// root_hash =
// resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.ledger_info.ledger_info.txn_root_hash;
// - Verify that transactions are sequential and none are missing
// - Validate ledger info
// - let ledger_info_hash =
// Hash(resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.ledger_info.ledger_info);
// - Verify signatures from resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.signatures are
// signing
// ledger_info_hash and that there are >2/3 nodes signing this
// correctly
// - Validate that the timestamp is relatively recent in
// resp.ledger_info_with_sigs.ledger_info.timestamp
// - If the number of transactions returned is less than limit for an ascending
// query
// or if the requested offset > current version for a descending query,
// the client should verify that the timestamp in ledger info is relatively
// recent to determine if it is likely that all transactions available were
// returned
syntax = "proto3";
package types;
import "access_path.proto";
import "account_state_blob.proto";
import "events.proto";
import "ledger_info.proto";
import "transaction.proto";
import "validator_change.proto";
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// ---------------- Update to latest ledger request
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// This API is used to update the client to the latest ledger version and
// optionally also request 1..n other pieces of data. This allows for batch
// queries. All queries return proofs that a client should check to validate
// the data.
//
// Note that if a client only wishes to update to the latest LedgerInfo and
// receive the proof that this latest ledger extends the client_known_version
// ledger the client had, they can simply set the requested_items to an empty
// list.
message UpdateToLatestLedgerRequest {
// This is the version the client already trusts. Usually the client should
// set this to the version it obtained the last time it synced with the
// chain. If this is the first time ever the client sends a request, it must
// use the waypoint hard-coded in its software.
uint64 client_known_version = 1;
// The items for which we are requesting data in this API call.
repeated RequestItem requested_items = 2;
}
message RequestItem {
oneof requested_items {
GetAccountStateRequest get_account_state_request = 1;
GetAccountTransactionBySequenceNumberRequest
get_account_transaction_by_sequence_number_request = 2;
GetEventsByEventAccessPathRequest get_events_by_event_access_path_request =
3;
GetTransactionsRequest get_transactions_request = 4;
}
}
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// ---------------- Update to latest ledger response
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Response from getting latest ledger
message UpdateToLatestLedgerResponse {
// Responses to the queries posed by the requests. The proofs generated will
// be relative to the version of the latest ledger provided below.
repeated ResponseItem response_items = 1;
// The latest ledger info this node has. It will come with at least 2f+1
// validator signatures as well as a proof that shows the latest ledger
// extends the old ledger the client had.
LedgerInfoWithSignatures ledger_info_with_sigs = 2;
// Validator change events from what the client last knew. This is used to
// inform the client of validator changes from the client's last known version
// until the current version
repeated ValidatorChangeEventWithProof validator_change_events = 3;
}
// Individual response items to the queries posed by the requests
message ResponseItem {
oneof response_items {
GetAccountStateResponse get_account_state_response = 3;
GetAccountTransactionBySequenceNumberResponse
get_account_transaction_by_sequence_number_response = 4;
GetEventsByEventAccessPathResponse get_events_by_event_access_path_response = 5;
GetTransactionsResponse get_transactions_response = 6;
}
}
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// ---------------- Get account state (balance, sequence number, etc.)
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Gets latest state for an account.
message GetAccountStateRequest {
// Account for which we are fetching the state.
bytes address = 1;
}
// State information returned by a get account state query.
message GetAccountStateResponse {
// Blob value representing the account state together with proof the client
// can utilize to verify it.
AccountStateWithProof account_state_with_proof = 1;
}
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// ---------------- Get single transaction by account + sequence number
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Get transactions that altered an account - this includes both sent and
// received. A user of this should check that the data returned matches what
// they expect. As an example, a potential attack vector would be something
// like the following: Alice is buying an apple from Bob. Alice's phone signs a
// transaction X with sequence number N that pays coins to Bob. Alice transmits
// this signature to Bob's payment terminal which then submits the transaction
// and checks its status to see if Alice can be given the apple. However, as Bob
// is doing this Alice constructs a second transaction X' also with sequence
// number N. Alice gets that transaction inserted in the blockchain. If Bob
// isn't thoughtful about how he uses this API he may assume that if he asks for
// the N'th transaction on Alice's account that when the API returns that this
// means the transaction has gone through. The point here is that one should be
// careful in reading too much into "transaction X is on the chain" and focus on
// the logs, which tell you what the transaction did.
//
// If a client submitted a transaction, they should also verify that the hash of
// the returned transaction matches what they submitted. As an example, if a
// client has two wallets that share the same account, they may both submit a
// transaction at the same sequence number and only one will be committed. A
// client should never assume that if they receive the response that this
// transaction was included that it means that this is definitely the
// transaction that was submitted. They should check that the hash matches what
// they sent
message GetAccountTransactionBySequenceNumberRequest {
// Account for which to query transactions
bytes account = 1;
uint64 sequence_number = 2;
// Set to true to fetch events for the transaction at this version
bool fetch_events = 3;
}
// Transaction information for transactions requested by
// GetAccountTransactionsRequest
message GetAccountTransactionBySequenceNumberResponse {
// When the transaction requested is committed, return the committed
// transaction with proof.
SignedTransactionWithProof signed_transaction_with_proof = 2;
// When the transaction requested is not committed, we give a proof that
// shows the current sequence number is smaller than what would have been if
// the transaction was committed.
AccountStateWithProof proof_of_current_sequence_number = 3;
}
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// ---------------- Get events by event access path
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Get events that exist on an event access path. In the current world,
// a user may specify events that were received, events that were sent, or any
// event that modifies their account
message GetEventsByEventAccessPathRequest {
AccessPath access_path = 1;
// The sequence number of the event to start with for this query. Use a
// sequence number of MAX_INT to represent the latest.
uint64 start_event_seq_num = 2;
// If ascending is true this query will return up to `limit` events that were
// emitted after `start_event_seq_num`. Otherwise it will return up to `limit`
// events before the offset. Both cases are inclusive.
bool ascending = 3;
// Limit number of results
uint64 limit = 4;
}
message GetEventsByEventAccessPathResponse {
// Returns an event and proof of each of the events in the request. The first
// element of proofs will be the closest to `start_event_seq_num`.
repeated EventWithProof events_with_proof = 1;
// If the number of events returned is less than `limit` for an ascending
// query or if start_event_seq_num > the latest seq_num for a descending
// query, returns the state of the account containing the given access path
// in the latest state. This allows the client to verify that there are in
// fact no extra events.
//
// The LedgerInfoWithSignatures which is on the main
// UpdateToLatestLedgerResponse can be used to validate this.
AccountStateWithProof proof_of_latest_event = 2;
}
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// ---------------- Get transactions
// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Get up to limit transactions starting from start_version.
message GetTransactionsRequest {
// The version of the transaction to start with for this query. Use a version
// of MAX_INT to represent the latest.
uint64 start_version = 1;
// Limit number of results
uint64 limit = 2;
// Set to true to fetch events for the transaction at each version
bool fetch_events = 3;
}
message GetTransactionsResponse {
TransactionListWithProof txn_list_with_proof = 1;
}
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