Permalink
Fetching contributors…
Cannot retrieve contributors at this time
347 lines (309 sloc) 12.3 KB
//===--- TargetCXXABI.h - C++ ABI Target Configuration ----------*- C++ -*-===//
//
// The LLVM Compiler Infrastructure
//
// This file is distributed under the University of Illinois Open Source
// License. See LICENSE.TXT for details.
//
//===----------------------------------------------------------------------===//
///
/// \file
/// Defines the TargetCXXABI class, which abstracts details of the
/// C++ ABI that we're targeting.
///
//===----------------------------------------------------------------------===//
#ifndef LLVM_CLANG_BASIC_TARGETCXXABI_H
#define LLVM_CLANG_BASIC_TARGETCXXABI_H
#include "llvm/Support/ErrorHandling.h"
namespace clang {
/// The basic abstraction for the target C++ ABI.
class TargetCXXABI {
public:
/// The basic C++ ABI kind.
enum Kind {
/// The generic Itanium ABI is the standard ABI of most open-source
/// and Unix-like platforms. It is the primary ABI targeted by
/// many compilers, including Clang and GCC.
///
/// It is documented here:
/// http://www.codesourcery.com/public/cxx-abi/
GenericItanium,
/// The generic ARM ABI is a modified version of the Itanium ABI
/// proposed by ARM for use on ARM-based platforms.
///
/// These changes include:
/// - the representation of member function pointers is adjusted
/// to not conflict with the 'thumb' bit of ARM function pointers;
/// - constructors and destructors return 'this';
/// - guard variables are smaller;
/// - inline functions are never key functions;
/// - array cookies have a slightly different layout;
/// - additional convenience functions are specified;
/// - and more!
///
/// It is documented here:
/// http://infocenter.arm.com
/// /help/topic/com.arm.doc.ihi0041c/IHI0041C_cppabi.pdf
GenericARM,
/// The iOS ABI is a partial implementation of the ARM ABI.
/// Several of the features of the ARM ABI were not fully implemented
/// in the compilers that iOS was launched with.
///
/// Essentially, the iOS ABI includes the ARM changes to:
/// - member function pointers,
/// - guard variables,
/// - array cookies, and
/// - constructor/destructor signatures.
iOS,
/// The iOS 64-bit ABI is follows ARM's published 64-bit ABI more
/// closely, but we don't guarantee to follow it perfectly.
///
/// It is documented here:
/// http://infocenter.arm.com
/// /help/topic/com.arm.doc.ihi0059a/IHI0059A_cppabi64.pdf
iOS64,
/// WatchOS is a modernisation of the iOS ABI, which roughly means it's
/// the iOS64 ABI ported to 32-bits. The primary difference from iOS64 is
/// that RTTI objects must still be unique at the moment.
WatchOS,
/// The generic AArch64 ABI is also a modified version of the Itanium ABI,
/// but it has fewer divergences than the 32-bit ARM ABI.
///
/// The relevant changes from the generic ABI in this case are:
/// - representation of member function pointers adjusted as in ARM.
/// - guard variables are smaller.
GenericAArch64,
/// The generic Mips ABI is a modified version of the Itanium ABI.
///
/// At the moment, only change from the generic ABI in this case is:
/// - representation of member function pointers adjusted as in ARM.
GenericMIPS,
/// The WebAssembly ABI is a modified version of the Itanium ABI.
///
/// The changes from the Itanium ABI are:
/// - representation of member function pointers is adjusted, as in ARM;
/// - member functions are not specially aligned;
/// - constructors and destructors return 'this', as in ARM;
/// - guard variables are 32-bit on wasm32, as in ARM;
/// - unused bits of guard variables are reserved, as in ARM;
/// - inline functions are never key functions, as in ARM;
/// - C++11 POD rules are used for tail padding, as in iOS64.
///
/// TODO: At present the WebAssembly ABI is not considered stable, so none
/// of these details is necessarily final yet.
WebAssembly,
/// The Microsoft ABI is the ABI used by Microsoft Visual Studio (and
/// compatible compilers).
///
/// FIXME: should this be split into Win32 and Win64 variants?
///
/// Only scattered and incomplete official documentation exists.
Microsoft
};
private:
// Right now, this class is passed around as a cheap value type.
// If you add more members, especially non-POD members, please
// audit the users to pass it by reference instead.
Kind TheKind;
public:
/// A bogus initialization of the platform ABI.
TargetCXXABI() : TheKind(GenericItanium) {}
TargetCXXABI(Kind kind) : TheKind(kind) {}
void set(Kind kind) {
TheKind = kind;
}
Kind getKind() const { return TheKind; }
/// Does this ABI generally fall into the Itanium family of ABIs?
bool isItaniumFamily() const {
switch (getKind()) {
case GenericAArch64:
case GenericItanium:
case GenericARM:
case iOS:
case iOS64:
case WatchOS:
case GenericMIPS:
case WebAssembly:
return true;
case Microsoft:
return false;
}
llvm_unreachable("bad ABI kind");
}
/// Is this ABI an MSVC-compatible ABI?
bool isMicrosoft() const {
switch (getKind()) {
case GenericAArch64:
case GenericItanium:
case GenericARM:
case iOS:
case iOS64:
case WatchOS:
case GenericMIPS:
case WebAssembly:
return false;
case Microsoft:
return true;
}
llvm_unreachable("bad ABI kind");
}
/// Are member functions differently aligned?
///
/// Many Itanium-style C++ ABIs require member functions to be aligned, so
/// that a pointer to such a function is guaranteed to have a zero in the
/// least significant bit, so that pointers to member functions can use that
/// bit to distinguish between virtual and non-virtual functions. However,
/// some Itanium-style C++ ABIs differentiate between virtual and non-virtual
/// functions via other means, and consequently don't require that member
/// functions be aligned.
bool areMemberFunctionsAligned() const {
switch (getKind()) {
case WebAssembly:
// WebAssembly doesn't require any special alignment for member functions.
return false;
case GenericARM:
case GenericAArch64:
case GenericMIPS:
// TODO: ARM-style pointers to member functions put the discriminator in
// the this adjustment, so they don't require functions to have any
// special alignment and could therefore also return false.
case GenericItanium:
case iOS:
case iOS64:
case WatchOS:
case Microsoft:
return true;
}
llvm_unreachable("bad ABI kind");
}
/// Are arguments to a call destroyed left to right in the callee?
/// This is a fundamental language change, since it implies that objects
/// passed by value do *not* live to the end of the full expression.
/// Temporaries passed to a function taking a const reference live to the end
/// of the full expression as usual. Both the caller and the callee must
/// have access to the destructor, while only the caller needs the
/// destructor if this is false.
bool areArgsDestroyedLeftToRightInCallee() const {
return isMicrosoft();
}
/// Does this ABI have different entrypoints for complete-object
/// and base-subobject constructors?
bool hasConstructorVariants() const {
return isItaniumFamily();
}
/// Does this ABI allow virtual bases to be primary base classes?
bool hasPrimaryVBases() const {
return isItaniumFamily();
}
/// Does this ABI use key functions? If so, class data such as the
/// vtable is emitted with strong linkage by the TU containing the key
/// function.
bool hasKeyFunctions() const {
return isItaniumFamily();
}
/// Can an out-of-line inline function serve as a key function?
///
/// This flag is only useful in ABIs where type data (for example,
/// vtables and type_info objects) are emitted only after processing
/// the definition of a special "key" virtual function. (This is safe
/// because the ODR requires that every virtual function be defined
/// somewhere in a program.) This usually permits such data to be
/// emitted in only a single object file, as opposed to redundantly
/// in every object file that requires it.
///
/// One simple and common definition of "key function" is the first
/// virtual function in the class definition which is not defined there.
/// This rule works very well when that function has a non-inline
/// definition in some non-header file. Unfortunately, when that
/// function is defined inline, this rule requires the type data
/// to be emitted weakly, as if there were no key function.
///
/// The ARM ABI observes that the ODR provides an additional guarantee:
/// a virtual function is always ODR-used, so if it is defined inline,
/// that definition must appear in every translation unit that defines
/// the class. Therefore, there is no reason to allow such functions
/// to serve as key functions.
///
/// Because this changes the rules for emitting type data,
/// it can cause type data to be emitted with both weak and strong
/// linkage, which is not allowed on all platforms. Therefore,
/// exploiting this observation requires an ABI break and cannot be
/// done on a generic Itanium platform.
bool canKeyFunctionBeInline() const {
switch (getKind()) {
case GenericARM:
case iOS64:
case WebAssembly:
case WatchOS:
return false;
case GenericAArch64:
case GenericItanium:
case iOS: // old iOS compilers did not follow this rule
case Microsoft:
case GenericMIPS:
return true;
}
llvm_unreachable("bad ABI kind");
}
/// When is record layout allowed to allocate objects in the tail
/// padding of a base class?
///
/// This decision cannot be changed without breaking platform ABI
/// compatibility, and yet it is tied to language guarantees which
/// the committee has so far seen fit to strengthen no less than
/// three separate times:
/// - originally, there were no restrictions at all;
/// - C++98 declared that objects could not be allocated in the
/// tail padding of a POD type;
/// - C++03 extended the definition of POD to include classes
/// containing member pointers; and
/// - C++11 greatly broadened the definition of POD to include
/// all trivial standard-layout classes.
/// Each of these changes technically took several existing
/// platforms and made them permanently non-conformant.
enum TailPaddingUseRules {
/// The tail-padding of a base class is always theoretically
/// available, even if it's POD. This is not strictly conforming
/// in any language mode.
AlwaysUseTailPadding,
/// Only allocate objects in the tail padding of a base class if
/// the base class is not POD according to the rules of C++ TR1.
/// This is non-strictly conforming in C++11 mode.
UseTailPaddingUnlessPOD03,
/// Only allocate objects in the tail padding of a base class if
/// the base class is not POD according to the rules of C++11.
UseTailPaddingUnlessPOD11
};
TailPaddingUseRules getTailPaddingUseRules() const {
switch (getKind()) {
// To preserve binary compatibility, the generic Itanium ABI has
// permanently locked the definition of POD to the rules of C++ TR1,
// and that trickles down to derived ABIs.
case GenericItanium:
case GenericAArch64:
case GenericARM:
case iOS:
case GenericMIPS:
return UseTailPaddingUnlessPOD03;
// iOS on ARM64 and WebAssembly use the C++11 POD rules. They do not honor
// the Itanium exception about classes with over-large bitfields.
case iOS64:
case WebAssembly:
case WatchOS:
return UseTailPaddingUnlessPOD11;
// MSVC always allocates fields in the tail-padding of a base class
// subobject, even if they're POD.
case Microsoft:
return AlwaysUseTailPadding;
}
llvm_unreachable("bad ABI kind");
}
friend bool operator==(const TargetCXXABI &left, const TargetCXXABI &right) {
return left.getKind() == right.getKind();
}
friend bool operator!=(const TargetCXXABI &left, const TargetCXXABI &right) {
return !(left == right);
}
};
} // end namespace clang
#endif