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---
2009-06-22:
- session_A: {}
session_B: {}
session_C: {}
session_D:
duration: 20
speaker: Casey West (cwest)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/284
talk:
comment: ' Welcome! '
tags:
- welcome
title: Welcome to YAPC|10
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2102
time: 09:00AM
- session_A: {}
session_B: {}
session_C: {}
session_D:
duration: 50
speaker: Richard Dice
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1446
talk:
comment: ' TPF addresses and welcomes The Perl Community at the beginning of YAPC|10! '
title: TPF Opening keynote
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1911
time: 09:20AM
- session_A: {}
session_B: {}
session_C: {}
session_D:
duration: 50
speaker: Larry Wall
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/273
talk:
comment: ' Expect the unexpected. '
title: Larry Wall Keynote
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2101
time: 10:20AM
- session_A: {}
session_B: {}
session_C: {}
session_D:
duration: 15
speaker: jerry gay (particle)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2995
talk:
comment: ' Parrot Foundation '
title: Parrot Foundation
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2103
time: 11:10AM
- session_A: {}
session_B: {}
session_C: {}
session_D:
duration: 5
speaker: Yaakov
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1670
talk:
comment: " YAPC's sessions are a great opportunity to build your perl skills. YAPC's social events are a unique opportunity to build the perl community. As a first time attendee, or a self-proclaimed neophyte, you represent the new strength of our community. We want to help you to meet the people who create perl and the modules you use everyday so you can get to know them and learn that you are already a vital member of the perl community. "
title: Welcome to the Perl Community
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2143
time: 11:25AM
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: Scott McWhirter (konobi)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/5137
talk:
comment: " Testing a whole system can be an expensive and time consuming process, especially with a lot of the teething problems that can occur. I'll be talking about my experiences with writing high level test automation, pitfalls and traps to avoid and detail the tools involved. "
tags:
- a8n
- behaviour
- development
- driven
- fit
- fitesque
- selenium
- tap
title: Test automation for the risk adverse
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1959
session_B:
duration: 50
speaker: Hans Dieter Pearcey (confound)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1760
talk:
comment: " CPAN is a huge source of power for Perl programmers. Various dangers can, like Kryptonite, drain this power from you. \"I'd like to use this module, but my sysadmin won't install anything that isn't in the OS package manager.\" Does this sound like you? Do not give in! Learn how to tame your operations staff using such techniques as * CPAN Distroprefs * cpan2dist, PAR, local::lib * CPAN::Mini * and more! "
tags:
- cpan
- maintenance
title: 'CPAN - A big enough lever to install the world'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1985
session_C:
duration: 50
speaker: Michael Schwern (Schwern)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/780
talk:
comment: ' Robert put it best: "I think you have a nice bent/slant/angle etc on a lot of stuff. I want you to get people talking. And no I would not expect every talk to be about perl. It would make me sad if they were all perl. But if you do it I would hope you could get everyone in the room to get excited about something. And I hope you would bore the crap out of others. Why do I think that b/c your audience is everyone from Larry to noob. You are not going to shock both of them or bore both of them with the same stuff." '
tags:
- ego
- schwern
title: Trapped In A Room With Schwern
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1960
session_D:
duration: 50
speaker: Patrick Michaud (Pm)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1692
talk:
comment: ' Rakudo Perl (Perl 6 on Parrot) continues to progress nicely, and new features of the language are being added all of the time. This talk jumps right to practical examples of using Perl 6 in Rakudo: * How to obtain and build the latest Rakudo Perl 6 * Variables * Contextualizers * Statements and Iterators * Basic I/O * Metaoperators (hypers, reductions, crosses) * Subroutines * Classes, methods, inheritance * Roles All of the examples in the talk will contain working Perl 6 code that can be used today in Rakudo Perl. '
tags:
- perl6
- rakudo
title: Perl 6 today
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1965
time: 01:00PM
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: lukec
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1570
talk:
comment: " We'll spend the first half of this talk talking about automated web testing - starting simple and then moving on to Business Driven Development (BDD). In the second half of the talk, Luke will show examples of how he does this with his distributed global development team at Socialtext. We'll finish up with Q&A. "
tags:
- a8n
- agile
- automation
- bdd
- selenium
- testing
- web
title: 'A8N-ing - Agile Web Testing'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1945
session_B:
duration: 50
speaker: Ricardo SIGNES (rjbs)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1634
talk:
comment: " This has been a good year for Git. More and more open source projects -- including perl5 and rakudo perl6 -- are moving their source code to Git repositories, and \"patches welcome\" is slowly being replaced with \"tell me where to pull from.\" There's been some loose talk suggesting that Git is highly complex and has a bizarre interface that makes it difficult to learn. This is completely and entirely false, mostly. This talk will explain how to get started with git, how it works, and how to think about git in order to really know what you're doing. "
tags:
- git
- tutorial
title: Git is Easy
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1942
session_C:
duration: 50
speaker: David Fetter
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2895
talk:
comment: " Remember when SQL wasn't Turing-complete? That's over now. Find out some of the amazing and frightening things that this implies, and exit the talk ready to use them. "
tags:
- cte
- list
- postgresql
- tree
title: You can do THAT without Perl?!?
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2000
session_D:
duration: 50
speaker: Patrick Michaud (Pm)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1692
talk:
comment: " One of the coolest features of Perl 6 is its regular expression syntax, which not only does traditional pattern matching but is also expressive enough to support grammars and advanced parsing. Indeed, it's the core for writing parsers with the Parrot Compiler Toolkit. This talk provides an exploration of Perl 6 regular expressions. It describes how they are currently used in Rakudo Perl and Parrot, and how they may be used to write parsers and as the foundation for more advanced data translations. Topics include: * Basic regular expression syntax * Named subrules and captures * Regexes, tokens, and rules * Creating grammars * Attaching actions to regexes * Processing parse trees The presentation will include numerous examples that work today in Rakudo Perl. "
tags:
- compiler
- grammars
- parrot
- perl6
- pge
- rakudo
- regexes
- toolkit
title: Perl 6 regexes and grammars
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1966
time: 01:55PM
- session_A: {}
session_B: {}
session_C:
duration: 50
speaker: Bruce Gray (Util)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1813
talk:
comment: " Learn to combine a select handful of Perl's flags and variables, and be rewarded with faster ways of munging data and handling your day-to-day work. Perl one-liners are an extension of \"The Unix Way\", making Win32 bearable, and Unix even better. "
tags:
- command
- line
- liners
- one
title: Command-line Perl
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2017
session_D:
duration: 50
speaker: Patrick Michaud (Pm)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1692
talk:
comment: ' “Rakudo Perl” is the Perl 6 compiler targeting the Parrot virtual machine. It currently supports much of Perl 6, and people are even beginning to write applications for it. This talk will present ways in which you (yes you!) can become active contributors to Perl 6 and Rakudo Perl. We will look in detail at the organization of the Perl 6 test suite, how to add new tests, the structure of the Rakudo Perl implementation, and where to start with writing code for Rakudo. This talk focuses heavily on Perl 6 itself, and does not include a lot of details about Parrot or its other programming languages. It will be particularly useful for people who are interested in participating in the hackathon that follows the conference, providing a "road map" of the current implementation status and where people can contribute (at many levels). '
tags:
- compiler
- perl6
- rakudo
title: Hacking Rakudo Perl 6
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1964
time: 02:55PM
- session_A:
duration: 20
speaker: Abigail
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/289
talk:
comment: ' A new CPAN module to help you test your regular expressions. Until recently, CPAN did not have a module to help you test every aspect of your patterns. This talks tells you about the features of Test::Regexp. '
tags:
- expressions.
- regular
- testing
title: Test::Regexp
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1992
session_B:
duration: 20
speaker: Mike Schilli
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1685
talk:
comment: " Lately, there's been a landslide movement of Open Source projects to github.com. Popular CPAN modules are no exception, they're enjoying increased community contributions the moment they move over. Learn how to submit patches to CPAN authors that can be integrated fast and painlessly, and how to move your CPAN module project's revision controlled (SVN/CVS) code over to github.com. "
tags:
- cpan
- git
- github
title: Moving CPAN module projects to github.com
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2001
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Jonathan Rockway (jrockway)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1681
talk:
comment: " You've heard about KiokuDB, but you're not quite sure how to start using it. This talk will show you how to organize your data and application code to use KiokuDB. Edit: now with slide link! "
tags:
- databases
- kiokudb
- moose
- oo
- oodb
- oop
- persistence
title: Using KiokuDB
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1970
session_D:
duration: 20
speaker: Jeff Horwitz
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2386
talk:
comment: ' The next generation of mod_perl embeds Rakudo Perl 6 inside of Apache and its basic functionality works out of the box today. But mod_perl6 still needs your help! In the first half of this talk we will discuss how to get started using mod_perl6, explore the differences from previous mod_perl versions, and demo a few simple handlers. In the second half of the talk, you will learn how you can help, diving into the internals and future goals so interested developers can start fixing bugs and adding new features. '
tags:
- apache
- mod_parrot
- mod_perl
- mod_perl6
- parrot
- perl6
title: Using and Contributing to mod_perl6 (A)
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1962
time: 03:50PM
- session_A:
duration: 20
speaker: Michael Peters (mpeters)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1655
talk:
comment: " The Test Anything Protocol is beginning to spread. What started out as a solution to Perl testing problems is now being used by PHP, Postgr eSQL, C, C++, and more. It starts as a simple \"1 ok\", \"2 ok\" and then you're hooked. Seems so simple but like most starter drugs there's a more complicated underbelly. Recently an IETF working was started to take the extisting implementations and all the extension propsals and turn them into a full standard. In this talk we'll examine the work that's been done so far. Starting with the basic building blocks (ok, not ok, comments), then some more interesting pieces (plans, pass, skip) and then into the more exciting (nested TAP, diagnostics) and experimental (logging, visualization) features. "
tags:
- tap
- testing
title: TAP in depth
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2004
session_B:
duration: 20
speaker: Barbie
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/230
talk:
comment: ' A look at the way CPAN has grown and continues to grow, together with a look at the statistics produced via CPAN Testers, featuring some predictions along the way. Also a chance for you to suggest more types of data analysis and presentation charts for the CPAN Testers Statistics website. '
tags:
- cpan
- statistics
title: The Statistics of CPAN
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1918
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Walt Mankowski (waltman)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1691
talk:
comment: " SQLite is the most widely deployed SQL database engine in the world. It's used throughout OS X as well as in Firefox, Google's Android, and in countless other applications. SQLite is extremely fast and lightweight, but it's lacking some features found in larger database systems. Fortunately SQLite can be easily extended with Perl. In this talk you'll learn how to write your own SQLite functions, aggregators and collators in Perl. "
tags:
- database
- dbi
- sqlite
title: 'SQLite Functions, Aggregators and Collators'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1993
session_D:
duration: 20
speaker: Jeff Horwitz
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2386
talk:
comment: ' The next generation of mod_perl embeds Rakudo Perl 6 inside of Apache and its basic functionality works out of the box today. But mod_perl6 still needs your help! In the first half of this talk we will discuss how to get started using mod_perl6, explore the differences from previous mod_perl versions, and demo a few simple handlers. In the second half of the talk, you will learn how you can help, diving into the internals and future goals so interested developers can start fixing bugs and adding new features. '
tags:
- apache
- mod_parrot
- mod_perl
- mod_perl6
- parrot
- perl6
title: Using and Contributing to mod_perl6 (B)
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2105
time: 04:15PM
- session_A:
duration: 20
speaker: Nathan Gray (kolibrie)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1613
talk:
comment: ' The Test Anything Protocol (TAP) is a simple interface between code to be tested and a harness that collects stats about each test. We will examine the protocol itself, mention Perl modules that help generate TAP, and discuss modules that read TAP and do useful things with the data. '
tags:
- testing
title: Getting the most out of TAP
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1971
session_B:
duration: 20
speaker: Hans Dieter Pearcey (confound)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1760
talk:
comment: ' Releasing code involves a lot of busywork: POD boilerplate, Makefile.PL or Build.PL skeleton, more POD boilerplate, MANIFEST (or MANIFEST.SKIP), various copyrights and licenses, even more POD boilerplate. Dist::Zilla (dzil) handles all this busywork (and more!) and gives you a powerful framework to extend and customize your development and release process. '
tags:
- author
- cpan
- dzil
title: 'Dist::Zilla - Automating quality since 2008'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1986
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Clinton Wolfe
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/5222
talk:
comment: " I've developed an ORM (Object-Relational Mapper) for use at my day job, OmniTI.com . We're often tasked with building scalable mod_perl web database applications on short schedules. I wanted to use an ORM to cut development time, having had good experiences with other ORMs. But ORMs have a nasty reputation as leading to database-intensive code that drives your DBA up a wall. After some discussion with our CEO, Theo Schlossnagle, I hit upon a design for an ORM that would be \"reluctant\" - it would resist making hidden calls to the database, and encourage you to prefetch everything. Several other features (not unique to Class::ReluctantORM) help make it idiot-resistant and DBA-friendly. It's now in use on several large, production sites, and is in its fourth minor version. The Class::ReluctantORM namespace has been reserved on CPAN, but I haven't released it yet - the plan is to do so in mid-May, with the fifth minor version. "
tags:
- dbas
- dbi
- grumpy
- orm
- reluctance
- scalability
title: 'Class::ReluctantORM - An ORM Your DBA can Live With'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1991
session_D:
duration: 20
speaker: Devin Austin
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/5208
talk:
comment: " Perl OO is hideous and painful, right? No! Perl 5’s new (post) modern object system Moose brings Perl into the spotlight as a formidable OO language choice.. Inspired by the Common LISP Object System (CLOS), Smalltalk and the Perl 6 meta model, Moose brings deep introspection, easy delegation, a malleable type constraint system, and in short, modernizes Perl's OO system. Less code == more win! "
tags:
- moose
title: Intro To Moose
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1967
time: 04:40PM
- session_A: {}
session_B: {}
session_C: {}
session_D:
duration: 120
speaker: Movie Night
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/event/587
time: 07:30PM
2009-06-23:
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: Shawn Moore (Sartak)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2245
talk:
comment: " Using Moose provides many immediate and obvious benefits, starting with the obviation of typing \"use strict\" and \"use warnings\" in your classes. The real power of Moose, however, rests in its extensibility. By subclassing Moose's metaclasses, you can augment and change Moose's behavior to suit your application's needs. This extensibility is powered by the meta-object protocol of Moose's foundation, Class::MOP. The motivating example for extending Moose will be the creation of a small web framework to empower a Twitter-alike. The focus will be creating meta-level roles so that metaclasses may select exactly which changes in behavior they wish to exhibit. Modules that will be used include Moose::Exporter (to define sugary keywords) and Moose::Util::MetaRole (to extend classes composably). Experience with using Moose to create regular classes is expected. Having some familiarity with roles will let you get more out of the talk. No experience with metaprogramming is required. "
tags:
- meta
- metaprogramming
- moose
- mop
- roles
- traits
- web
title: Extending Moose for Applications
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1880
session_B:
duration: 50
speaker: Matt Trout
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1846
talk:
comment: " Now 0.08100 has finally shipped, we're looking to the future - what design mistakes did I make right at the start, what baggage have we acquired along the way. I'll be explaining what I think we got right, what I think we got wrong, and how an ORM shouldn't really be something you have to think about but something that fades into the language. Then I'll explain how we're going to get there. "
tags:
- class
- db
- dbix
- orm
title: The future of DBIx::Class
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1975
session_C:
duration: 50
speaker: Christopher Nehren (apeiron)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2795
talk:
comment: ' Writing command line apps can be painful, inconsistent, and sometimes difficult to get right (not to mention repetitive and boring). Thanks to some recent developments on CPAN, this process can be smoothed out and simplified so that even mere mortals can understand it. Put enough of these cool technologies together and it even becomes fun. This talk presents how to use App::Cmd, MooseX::App::Cmd, MooseX::GetOpt, and MooseX::SimpleConfig to create commandline applications with less effort, more tests, and more fun. The audience is expected to be comfortable with Moose and the concepts of CLI programming. The focus is on working code, not theory, and people are expected and encouraged to plug in the code and ask questions. '
tags:
- app%3A%3Acmd
- cli
- command_line
- moose
- moosex%3A%3Aapp%3A%3Acmd
- pain_relief
title: CLI apps don't have to suck
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2016
time: 08:00AM
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: chromatic
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1959
talk:
comment: " It's 2009, but too much Perl code and tutorials and books are stuck in 1999. While the core may progress slowly, the CPAN is still Perl's shining gem -- and the source of solutions to countless Perl problems. The Perl community as a whole has learned tremendous lessons over the past 15 years about how to write effective, powerful, concise, and elegant code. What works in 2009 is very different from worked in 1994, or 1999, or 2004. This talk introduces some of the newer ideas, idioms, modules, and trends that you need to explore to take full advantage of all that Perl 5 has to offer in 2009. Topics covered will include testing, Moose, Devel::Declare, autodie, roles, autobox, and more. "
tags:
- development
- modern
- perl
- software
title: Take Advantage of Modern Perl
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1983
session_B:
duration: 50
speaker: Perrin Harkins (perrin)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1636
talk:
comment: ' In the past few years, many new web proxy servers have come onto the scene with new performance promises and features. Servers based on non-blocking I/O bring claims of greatly improved performance. At the same time, FastCGI has become more widely used, giving people a possible alternative to mod_perl. This talk will help you choose the right architecture for your project by presenting a useful set of benchmarks and a comparison of strong points and key features. '
title: Choosing a Web Architecture for Perl
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1958
session_C:
duration: 50
speaker: Stevan Little
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1797
talk:
comment: ' ORMs are the preferred object store for discriminating hackers. However ORMs suffer from the object<->relational impedence mismatch which sometimes requires compromises in the design of your object model. With KiokuDB, you no longer need to compomise! KiokuDB is a object graph persistence engine with several backend stores including a DBI backend that works with your favorite RDBMS. This talk will introduce the basics of KiokuDB and then delve into a series of real-world case studies to show how KiokuDB effectively fits into more traditional applications. '
tags:
- databases
- dbi
- fey
- kiokudb
- moose
- oo
- oodb
- oop
- persistence
title: 'KiokuDB - A Real World Introduction'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1914
time: 08:55AM
- session_A:
duration: 20
speaker: Stevan Little
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1797
talk:
comment: " Moose is in it's 3rd year and going strong. In this talk we will discuss the current state of Moose and explore both the pros and cons of introducing Moose into your codebase. We will also delve into a couple real-world case studies to illustrate how Moose can fit into both legacy projects as well as new ones. "
tags:
- modern
- moose
- oo
- oop
title: To Moose or Not To Moose
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1941
session_B:
duration: 20
speaker: Ricardo SIGNES (rjbs)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1634
talk:
comment: ' Ok, email is a horrible technology with impossible technical specifications, implementations that are broken in seriously incompatible ways, and massive security issues that have led to a 9:1 noise to signal ratio. It stinks and makes me want to kill. ...but who am I kidding? I love email. It presents fun challenges, and along with the web is the internet medium most used by users of all types, each with their own needs. This talk will review a few new Email:: modules developed in the last year and suitable for anybody who has to do stuff with email. Among these are Email::Sender, Email::MIME::Kit, and Email::ARF. '
tags:
- email
title: I <3 Email
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1943
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Leonard Miller (olegm)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1817
talk:
comment: " In this talk, we will discuss the different approaches that you can take to get beyond 'beginner' or 'entry level' status in your Job and Career as a Perl developer. "
tags:
- beginner
title: Things you can do to stop being a n00b
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1871
time: 09:55AM
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: Hans Dieter Pearcey (confound)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1760
talk:
comment: " Moose is a solid foundation for any project, and a lot of day-to-day needs can be met with common uses of has() and Moose's built-in Perl type constraints. But what happens when your codebase scales past that point? This talk covers the next level of Moose usage: creating your own reusable extensions, with roles, type constraints, and Moose::Exporter. "
tags:
- moose
title: Code Reuse with Moose
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1984
session_B:
duration: 50
speaker: Jim Brandt
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1617
talk:
comment: " In difficult financial times, all businesses are looking to do more with less. Automating repetitive tasks with computers is one way to do this. This session will discuss how to use open source tools to implement workflow using real-world examples. I'll discuss what you get with the existing Workflow.pm module, what you need to build to get things up and running, and whether it's worth it for your company. "
tags:
- bpm
- workflow
title: Business Process Management with Workflow.pm
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1935
session_C:
duration: 50
speaker: Michael Schwern (Schwern)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/780
talk:
comment: " All too often you look at someone's Perl code and say \"oh, you can do that better with X module\". Or you find a new or isolated Perl programmer who never knew about strict or List::Util or anything like that. But its not just one module, its dozens. And even if you know about them all you still have to use and depend on them all individually and convince them to play nice together. perl5i aims to improve Perl in a single line, \"use perl5i\". It pulls in and ties together useful CPAN modules which improve the language and everyone needs at one point or another. autodie, autobox, List::Util, Scalar::Util, English, Alias, Modern::Perl, DateTime, IO::Handle... and more. It takes the tribal knowledge of what the best CPAN modules are and puts them all in one place. perl5i lets us improve and explore Perl 5 without all the overhead of actually patching the language. It also gives us an outlet for our pain about programming Perl 5, and the means to fix it. http://github.com/schwern/perl5i and please express your pain in the issue tracker. (perl5i was mentioned in \"Trapped In A Room With Schwern\" and nearly took over the talk, so people seem interested) "
tags:
- perl5
- reimagine
title: 'perl5i: Perl 5 Improved'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2155
time: 10:20AM
- session_A:
duration: 20
speaker: Chip Salzenberg (chip)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/159
talk:
comment: " Chip offered to give this talk for us. Oops. He didn't give us an abstract. "
title: Core Hacking
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2172
session_B:
duration: 20
speaker: Mike Schilli
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1685
talk:
comment: ' Gadgets like USB rocket launchers often come with Windows-only CDs, but can be controlled on Linux with libusb and Perl. Learn how to write a Perl script on a Ubuntu Laptop, that turns and tilts a USB cannon, which finally fires styrofoam rockets into the audience. Live demo! '
tags:
- libusb
title: Driving a USB Rocket Launcher from Perl in User Space
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1999
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Chris Prather (perigrin)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/983
talk:
comment: " XML::Toolkit is the results of years of study, and two large production projects. It's a collection of tools to make some of the pain of integrating XML into an application go away. XML::Toolkit was designed to handle large XML document sets, to be flexible, and to produce valid clean correct XML. This talk will cover the history of the project, the various tools in the toolkit and example applications based on real-world code. "
tags:
- moose
- perl
- xml
title: 'XML::Toolkit: Tools to Ease the Pain'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1932
time: 11:15AM
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: Yuval Kogman (nothingmuch)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1798
talk:
comment: " In 2005 the Pugs project introduced many hackers including myself to Haskell, a statically typed, lazily evaluated, purely functional programming language for writing code that writes code that writes code. This conference is about Perl, a dynamically typed, procedural, side effect heavy scripting language for munging text files. Wake up! It's been 15 years since 1994, and more excitingly, it's been 4 years since 2005! Perl has recently seen some amazing developments. Perl 5 is now, more than ever, a serious language for complex projects. With this trend comes a new set of best practices for writing Modern Perl: adaptable high level code that uses state of the art tools in a modern way. At the core lies heavy use of Moose and a deep functional programming influence. I will try to share my current approach to programming Perl, shamelessly stealing from the collective wisdom of some of the smartest programmers both in and outside of the Perl community. "
tags:
- functional
- haskell
- immutable
- lazy
- modern
- moose
- oo
- perl
- pure
title: What Haskell did to my brain
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1956
session_B:
duration: 50
speaker: Jonathan Rockway (jrockway)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1681
talk:
comment: " Perl changes quickly. 10 years ago, the Web was still cool, and there was Perl and CGI. Then the concept of the \"web application\" was invented, and we got mod_perl. Fast forward to the more recent past, and other languages started being \"cool\" too. Ruby had awesome syntax. PHP was sooo easy to get started with. Python made it impossible to write bad code! Perl was feeling kind of left out. Then we got Catalyst. Suddenly people realized that writing web applications didn't have to suck. We could use OO correctly! We didn't have to have heredocs with HTML in them! The real effect of Catalyst, though, was that it catalyzed (heh) the community. We realized that Perl is fun! We realized that we could try new ideas. And, since Catalyst was so productive, we had a lot of free time to come up with new cool stuff. This talk is about that cool stuff. The Perl community is moving really quickly now, and a 2007 \"modern Perl web app\" is not the same as a 2009 modern web app. This talk will show you some new modules and projects that make writing web applications fun. We'll look at some cool modules, like Catalyst, Moose, KiokuDB, JSORB, Bread::Board, HTTP::Engine, Devel::Declare, etc. So this talk will show you what a new web app started in 2009 might look like, and how you can take pieces of it and put it in your older web application. Perl is fun! "
tags:
- catalyst
- enlightened
- kiokudb
- modern
- modules
- moose
- naked
- not
- web
title: Web Applications in 2009
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1972
session_C:
duration: 50
speaker: Nicholas Perez (nperez)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1719
talk:
comment: " POE and it's filter framework make it ideal for protocol implementation. As many protocols do, they are simply payloads layered like an onion. By implementing filters for each layer and stacking them, it enables a clean, and encapsulated way for developers to get to the core payload without cluttering the guts of the application with layer stripping code. A prime example is XMLRPC. This is a dissection of the filters needed to successfully implement an XMLRPC server/client. "
tags:
- filter
- http
- parsing
- poe
- protocol
- stackable
- xml
- xmlrpc
title: Protocol abstraction through stackable POE::Filters
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1926
time: 01:00PM
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: Matt Trout
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1846
talk:
comment: " There's More Than One Way To Do It! But this year, one is more popular than another. Next year, that may have changed. And sometimes there's more than one way but most of them are wrong. And consistency can be a good thing too. This talk takes an irreverent, high speed look at emergent, emerged and obsoleted standards in perl, and talks about how we need to think in order to transition between them, and to code for the ages (or at least the maintenance programmer). Touching on the view from a web framework maintainer, the Enlightened Perl extended core project and other efforts, Matt tries to explain why standards are good, why we already have them, and why most perl programmers still haven't actually noticed that. "
tags:
- best
- epo
- perl
- perl5
- practice
- standards
title: 'Catching a ::Std - Standardisation and best practices in the perl community'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1978
session_B:
duration: 50
speaker: Jesse Vincent
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/540
talk:
comment: ' SD is a disconnected, replicated bug tracking system designed to let developers track and resolve bugs without sacrificing the flexibility of the modern workflows made possible by distributed version control systems. In this talk, you’ll learn about what how SD works and how SD helps you get work done. Topics covered will include: day to day use of the SD CLI and Web interfaces sharing SD databases with other users taking other bug trackers like Google Code and Trac offline with SD integrating SD with your distributed version control system improving your workflow by scripting SD Find out more about SD at http://syncwith.us '
tags:
- bug
- bugtracker
- p2p
- prophet
- rt
- sd
- trac
- tracking
title: Distributed bug tracking with SD
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2043
session_C:
duration: 50
speaker: Michael Peters (mpeters)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1655
talk:
comment: " Now that you've got that test suite written how do you take full advantage of it? Continuous Integration Testing is the practice of automatically running your test suite against any and all changes committed to your code repository. Java has Cruise Control, Python has Buildbot but nothing has really taken off in the Perl world. There are Perl solutions (CABIE, Tinderbox, etc) which we will compare and discuss their short comings. We'll examine common homebrewed techniques that provide the 90% solution while discussing what an ideal system would look like. It doesn't matter if this is your first project with a test suite or your hundredth, anyone looking to take their automated testing to the next level will benefit from this discussion. "
tags:
- control
- integration
- source
- testing
title: Continuous Integration Testing in Perl
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2005
time: 01:55PM
- session_A:
duration: 20
speaker: Chris Prather (perigrin)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/983
talk:
comment: " The Enlightened Perl Organisation was established support certain Perl development efforts that ensure Perl's future as an enterprise-grade development platform. One of the initial projects for the EPO is the creation of an Extended Core. A Perl distribution that provides some best of breed applications that are vetted and currently being used in large Enterprises. This talk is a discussion of the Modules in the EPO Extended Core, and the selection process they underwent, as well as how you can get involved in the process and in the Enlightened Perl Organisation itself. "
tags:
- catalyst
- dbic
- epo
- moose
title: The EPO Extended Core
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1931
session_B:
duration: 20
speaker: DrForr
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1819
talk:
comment: ' [very loosely] The challenges of i18n/localizing legacy Apache::ASP code. .po files, spreadsheets, working with translators, google code and SVN. '
tags:
- asp
- i8n
- internatlonalization
- ppi
- svn
title: Oops! I i18n'd your legacy app!
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2156
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Steven Lembark
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1505
talk:
comment: ' Perly arrays are flexible, but there are still a few things that lists can help with. Memory management is one: linked lists return space to the free store as it is freed. Being able to walk multiple lists at once without having to use offsets for all of them is another. Both of these are boon for high-volume processing (e.g. bioinformatics). They also simplify granular locking in threaded applicatons. Singly-linked lists are not complicated in Perl, and if done right can be quite fast. They do require a destructor, however, and reversing the standard picture of thier structure to work well. '
title: 'Linked Lists in Perl: How, and why bother.'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1840
time: 02:55PM
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: David Moreno (damog)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1688
talk:
comment: " Perl is being actively used to develop large scalable applications to deal with the major, hyped and popular social networks. Thanks to great advances on Perl libraries and 3rd party modules, one can build new, smoking, bleeding-edge technologies, based on the social networks' available APIs. Not only PHP or Ruby are being used to develop 3rd party applications for these social networks, also Perl. Heavily. And if you are not using Perl to do so or are skeptical about it, this is the perfect talk for you to attend. There will be two main sections on this presentation. One is focused on developing for a social network, as a 3rd party application; second, developing a social network using Perl, which Web modules, libraries and technologies, mainly under the Modern Perl paradigm. "
tags:
- bebo
- facebook
- media
- myspace
- networks
- perl
- social
- tagged
- twitter
- xanga
title: Perl in the Time of Social Networks
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2019
session_B: {}
session_C:
duration: 50
speaker: Todd Rinaldo (toddr)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1699
talk:
comment: " A year ago, myself and 2 others were assigned a project to provide a revamp of a web based configuration management system. We were a team of 3 moderatley experienced perl programmers with no Catalyst, DBIC, Template, or Perl testing experience. This is a story of our trials and tribulations starting out from 0 with these technologies and building a fully functional system. Come learn from our mistakes so you won't make them yourself when you decide to take the plunge "
tags:
- catalyst
- dbic
- template
- toolkit
- tt
title: 'Catalyst, DBIC, and TT for world domination'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2060
time: 03:20PM
- session_A:
duration: 20
speaker: brad oaks (bradoaks)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1811
talk:
comment: " This talk will help you get started arranging your tests into modules. We'll cover setting up a simple TAP::Harness to run your tests. Then we'll see how Plus Three has used Test::Class to divide up and reuse code in our test suite. Separating tests out from a large .t file into modules and subroutines has helped me confirm more quickly that a code change has not introduced a regression. Developers save time by only running the relevant subset of tests before committing a change to the code or a change to the tests themselves. I'll offer a few tips on checking preconditions in your testing environment (e.g. is a daemon running, is an external service url reachable) and either bailing out gracefully or trying to remedy the situation. You can ease into this modularization adventure. With Test::Class your shinier new tests can work right beside the venerable dustier ones letting you rework them as they need it. "
title: Warming up to Modular Testing with Test::Class
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1996
session_B:
duration: 20
speaker: Scott Walters (scrottie)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1960
talk:
comment: " One Perl programmer's inside view of the industry that is Vegas electronic gaming and the story of how a small startup using Perl succeeded in bringing a new technology to market where larger players failed. Onerous security requirements and regulations left other vendors stuck. I'd like to talk about some of the challenges we faced meeting these requirements, how we solved them using Perl, and how Perl is uniquely suited to unique challenges. I'd also like to give an inside, but censored, view of this seldom seen and fascinating industry, talking about the the regulations, politics, hardware, history, and security. "
tags:
- easy
- fools
- games
- gaming
- money
- parting
- security
title: Perl in Vegas
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1974
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Jonathan Swartz
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2783
talk:
comment: ' CHI provides a unified, implementation-independent caching API - a "DBI for caching". This talk will introduce CHI and describe how to use its features for more flexible and effective caching. CHI HIGHLIGHTS * Works with the gamut of popular cache backends: memory, Berkeley DB, DBI, memory mapped files (via Cache::FastMmap), and memcached (via Cache::Memcached and similar). * Provides a very low barrier to the creation of new drivers, akin to writing a TIE interface to your data store. * Offers features beyond the usual caching API, such as probabilistic expiration, background recomputation, and multi-level caches. * Well-positioned for use in any package that wants to employ caching in an implementation-independent way. Obvious candidates include include web frameworks (Catalyst, Mason, CGI::Application), session managers (Apache::Session, CGI::Session), and object-relational mappers (Rose::DB::Object, DBIx::Class). Ideal audience member is an intermediate Perl developer. However, Perl developers of all levels, and non-Perl developers interested in caching techniques (e.g. for web development), could benefit from this talk. CHI STATUS CHI was developed for the Hearst corporation and is widely used on the Hearst magazine websites. It was released to CPAN on January 19, 2008. MORE INFORMATION * "CPAN documentation":http://cpan.uwinnipeg.ca/htdocs/CHI/CHI.html * "Solutions for typical cache usage problems":http://use.perl.org/~jonswar/journal/35579 ROUGH SLIDE OUTLINE * What is CHI * Basic API - get/set/remove, namespaces, expiration * Drivers - summary of available drivers (Memory, File, FastMmap, BerkeleyDB, DBI, Memcached) and their trade-offs * Drivers - show pretty graph comparing performance between drivers * Drivers - show code for BerkeleyDB driver, to illustrate how easy it is to create new drivers * Features - avoiding miss stampedes (many processes try to recompute cache when it expires) * Features - avoiding recomputation latency (client has to wait while an item is recomputed) * Subcaches ** L1 cache - e.g. back up a memcached cache with a local memory cache ** Mirror cache - e.g. migrate cache from one location or driver to another * Cache statistics ** CHI can collect statistics at run-time and issue periodic reports ** Show pretty graph of statistics collected on a real website '
title: 'CHI: Unified caching for Perl'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1969
time: 04:15PM
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: Dan Dascalescu
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/5223
talk:
comment: " MojoMojo is the most complex open source Catalyst application developed to date. It is a Web2.0 wiki with AJAX live preview, hierarchical structure, tags, diffs, pluggable syntax, permissions/ACL, attachments, RSS feeds, a photo gallery, edit conflict resolution via 3-way merge, themes/skinning, localization, built-in full-text search, and a reverse index. Since it's built on top of the Perl Catalyst Web framework, MojoMojo supports any Web server, and includes its own standalone one. It also support any database backend supported by the DBIx::Class ORM, and has been successfully tested with PostgreSQL, SQLite, and MySQL. "
tags:
- blog
- catalyst
- cms
- wiki
title: 'MojoMojo - the Elegant Wiki, Catalyst-powered'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2002
session_B: {}
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Timothy Appnel (tima)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2797
talk:
comment: " Movable Type began life as nearly 8 years ago as a tool for enthusiasts and Blogger refugees that grew rapidly over the years to power millions of blogs of ever shape and form. Like it or not, MT is one of the most widely-deployed and well-known pieces of Perl software in existence and is an untapped resource to the Perl community with its GPL license. Despite being maligned for its commercial background and startup missteps, there is value in the GPL'ed code and opportunity for the Perl community to demonstrate that Perl is not a dying language and can be very useful to every day users. As a long-time veteran of MT and Perl development who is not afraid to speak his mind, Tim will provide his unique perspective on this topic. * MT Over Time -- from the beginnning to present day * Architectural Makeup -- what can it do and how * How MTOS benefits from CPAN & how CPAN can benefit from MTOS * MTOS Roadmap, Current Activity & Getting Involved The presentation will concluded with Tim fielding questions, feedback and leading a discussion from the audience. "
tags:
- action
- blogging
- call
- cpan
- gpl
- media
- movable
- mt
- open
- publishing
- social
- source
- to
- type
title: 'Movable Type Open Source (MTOS): The Perl Publishing System The Community Forgot'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2095
time: 04:40PM
2009-06-24:
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: Morris Siegel (Morrie)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1707
talk:
comment: " One of the chief reasons for Perl's popularity is its regexp pattern-matching facility, and Perl 6 is substantially more powerful than Perl 5 in that regard. Snobol4 is arguably the first widely-available language providing a pattern-matching facility, and despite its age, and despite all the new features of Perl 6, there are still some aspects in which Snobol4 pattern-matching is more powerful than that of Perl 6. This talk provides an overview of Snobol4 pattern-matching, then presents a number of possible enhancements to Perl 6 based on ideas inspired by Snobol4 but adapted to Perl's idiom. In addition, we propose various other suggestions that are intended to make Perl 6 pattern-matching easier to learn and use. "
tags:
- 6
- grammar
- matching
- pattern
- perl
- perl6
- regexp
- snobol
- snobol4
title: Enhancing Perl 6 Pattern-Matching with Ideas from Snobol4
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1988
session_B:
duration: 50
speaker: Steven Lembark
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1505
talk:
comment: " Most users don't ever realize just how much of a memory hog Perl is. Being Perl, however, the language makes it easy to find out. Using Devel::Peel and Devel::Size. This talk uses both to peer into scalars, arrays, and hashes and shows some ways to reduce the overhead when dealing with long-lived or high-volume applications. Viewers should walk away with enough understanding of the modules to track memory use in their own code. "
title: Memory Manglement With Perl
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1841
session_C: {}
session_D:
duration: 50
speaker: Paul Grassie
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1733
talk:
comment: ' This talk provides an overview of how Perl manages variables internally, the role of typeglobs and symbol tables in the import-export mechanism, and creating subroutine wrappers through selective aliasing. '
title: Symbol Tables & Typeglobs
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1908
time: 08:00AM
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: Walt Mankowski (waltman)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1691
talk:
comment: " In this talk we'll discuss how to write multithreaded programs in Perl. We'll begin with the basic threading model in Perl and how it differs from other popular thread systems such as pthreads and Java threads. We'll discuss how to create threads, how to share data between threads, and how to coordinate access to data using locks and semaphores. Finally we'll talk about how to use higher-level concepts such as queues and thread pools "
tags:
- threads
title: Getting Started with Multithreaded Perl
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1990
session_B:
duration: 50
speaker: Josh ben Jore (jjore@world / diotalevi@perlmonks)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1468
talk:
comment: ' Effective Debugging covers the basics of debugging Perl (and Ruby) programs on Linux and Mac OS X. * How to make debugging easy * Copy-n-paste voodoo * A bit of shazam Beginners can learn how to avoid needing voodoo and can add some copy-n-paste voodoo to their toolkit. Experts can take some fancy tricks and learn how to craft their own. '
tags:
- debugging
- fail
title: Effective Debugging
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1973
session_C:
duration: 50
speaker: Abigail
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/289
talk:
comment: ' This mini tutorial will explain how grouping and (back)referencing works in regular expressions. Special attention will be paid to the new 5.10 features: named capture groups, %+ and %-, relative backreferencing, \g{ }, and group count resetting. We will also show how you can use (named) subpatters to write powerfull parsers. '
tags:
- expressions
- regular
- tutorial
title: 'Regexp Mini Tutorial: Grouping and Referencing'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1994
session_D:
duration: 50
speaker: Ingy döt Net
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2931
talk:
comment: ' YAML is used in a plethora of projects in Perl and beyond. Perl YAML tools have trailed in the polls for a long time. This year all that is changing. Yes We Can: * Have complete YAML 1.1 in Perl * Depend on totally accurate Dumpers and Loaders * Finally do streaming processing on YAML * Use types and tags with confidence * Have YAML that works with processors in other languages * Tokenize YAML for syntax highlighting * Stop using global variables for an API * Have an upgrade path for YAML processors In this talk, Ingy will show the new tools that were created as the result of his (long awaited) TPF grant project completion. '
tags:
- grant
- ingy
- naked
- perl
- tpf
- yaml
title: All New YAML Tools for Perl
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1948
time: 08:55AM
- session_A:
duration: 20
speaker: Robin Darby
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1466
talk:
comment: ' Talk aimed at demonstrating how perl can be used to manage Amazon AWS ec2 instances. Including performance measuring, automatic scaling, bundling and deployments. '
tags:
- amazon
- ec2
title: 'perl, cloud glue?'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1870
session_B:
duration: 20
speaker: Tatsuhiko Miyagawa (miyagawa)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1695
talk:
comment: " Ajax is all about Web 2.0 sites, but the technology is also useful to build a desktop application running as a web server on your desktop (localhost). In this talk, I'll guide you how to build a rich desktop application running in your browser using jQuery and its UI libraries as a frontend, talking to Perl and HTTP::Engine based web server backed by SQLite database, based on my experience with the media RSS browser application Remedie http://remediecode.org/ "
tags:
- ajax
- httpengine
- javascript
- jquery
- sqlite
title: 'Build a desktop application with Perl, HTTP::Engine, SQLite and jQuery'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2018
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Steven Lembark
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1505
talk:
comment: ' List::Util & Scalar::Util are fast, simple, and handy to have. Problem is: most people never learn about them. This is a quick introduction to the utility functions, how to use them, and why. '
title: Utils are your Friends
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1850
session_D:
duration: 20
speaker: Ricardo SIGNES (rjbs)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1634
talk:
comment: " Data validation is a real pain, but it's a huge help in preventing bugs. By using one system for validating data everywhere, the burden of validation is greatly simplified. Rx is a schema language that can be used to validate data structures anywhere in your Perl programs. It integrates with Moose types, is extremely extensible, and is portable across languages: Rx implementations also exist in Python, Ruby, PHP, and JavaScript. "
title: Validating Data Everywhere with Rx
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1944
time: 09:55AM
- session_A:
duration: 20
speaker: Karen Pauley
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/302
talk:
comment: " Most of you weren't forced to come to YAPC by your boss, and most of you aren't paid to contribute to Perl or other Open Source projects. As volunteers you can choose to join in. But if you don't like it, you can easily choose to leave. All teams and projects need some sort of management, and good management isn't easy. If your team members are distributed around the world, with different languages and cultures, it's even harder. Make them volunteers and it may become almost impossible to stay productive. In this talk I will describe the common problems, tell you how to avoid them, and explain what to do when everything goes wrong. "
tags:
- management
- volunteers
title: Remote Controlled Volunteers
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2067
session_B:
duration: 20
speaker: Brock Wilcox (awwaiid)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1650
talk:
comment: " One of the tried and true ways of debugging is to sprinkle 'print \"Here! $val\\n\"' around and see what happens or if the program even reaches that point. Simple and effective! Carp::REPL lets you take this a step further by starting an interactive Read-Eval-Print Loop (REPL) at an arbitrary point in your program. I've taken this technique and mixed in a splash of Continuity to build an interactive web-based REPL and inspector for your application. The REPL lets you execute arbitrary code, the inspector gives you a GUI for traversing your callstack and manipulating your variables. It works on regular applications and CGI scripts too. You just add a single \"inspect()\" where you like and you'll be whackin' those bugs DOWN! In this talk I'll show you how to use the tool and how it's built... and how you can add to it with plugins. "
tags:
- cgi
- continuity
- debug
- repl
- web
title: Drop-In Web-Based REPL for CGI Applications
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2012
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Leonard Miller (olegm)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1817
talk:
comment: ' If you are confused by $self->{item} then this is the talk for you. We will talk about all the things that confuse a newer programmer with Object Oriented Perl syntax. '
tags:
- data%3A%3Adumper
- oo
- ooperl
title: 'Object oriented perl -- everything you were too embarrassed to ask.'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1825
session_D: {}
time: 10:20AM
- session_A:
duration: 20
speaker: Cory Watson (gphat)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2163
talk:
comment: " Humans are visual creatures. That being said, few things help bring data from the ethereal to the concrete better than data visualization. In this talk we will quickly explore some of the power that Chart::Clicker and it's underlying libraries grant in your quest to visualize the subtleties of numbers. We will cover ways beyond simple lines, bars and circles to present data to your users. Come and channel your inner Tufte as we explore the beautiful works you could be creating. "
tags:
- charting
- clicker
- drugs
- graphs
- moose
- rocknroll
- sex
- visualization
title: Data Visualization with Chart::Clicker
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1879
session_B:
duration: 20
speaker: Brock Wilcox (awwaiid)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1650
talk:
comment: " The mightly WWW::Mechanize is fantastic... right up until you have to deal with some javascript. The HtmlUnit project has build on the Mozilla Rhino engine to create a browser agent that works even against complex javascript. It passes the JQuery test suite, as an example of it's powers. We will present the Perl interface to the HtmlUnit library, setting you on the path to scraping and testing those javascript-dependent sites that you've being eyeing for so long. "
tags:
- javascript
- jquery
- testing
- web
title: 'WWW::HtmlUnit - Scrape and Test Javascript-Using Sites'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2013
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: David Fetter
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2895
talk:
comment: " While travelling the world advocating PostgreSQL, it's hard to keep a newsletter going out each week. Find out how Perl and $EDITOR help out with this task, and how you can make your life easier, too. "
tags:
- journalism
- newsletter
- perl
- postgresql
- pwn
title: 'Perl PWNs, or How I Use Perl to Publish a Newsletter'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1997
session_D:
duration: 20
speaker: Dan Dascalescu
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/5223
talk:
comment: ' Given their live nature, web applications are a bit tricky to debug. This talk will introduce you to debugging Catalyst web applications, using both the Perl built-in debugger, and the ActiveState Komodo IDE. '
tags:
- app
- application
- catalyst
- debug
- komodo
- web
title: Debugging Catalyst Applications
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2003
time: 10:45AM
- session_A:
duration: 50
speaker: Cory Watson (gphat)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/2163
talk:
comment: ' Perl is a wonderful language. It provides us with smorgasbord of choices when time comes for implementation. Unfortunately these choices can be frustrating and paralyzing for potential users. Moose represents a "best practices" approach to Object Oriented Programming in Perl. As the manager of a development team, I have strong opinions on how Perl makes my job difficult and how projects like Moose take away a lot of the pain. We will start with an introduction to Moose. This introduction is high level and meant to show how Moose can take away a lot of the yak-shaving in day-to-day work. The talk will then enumerate reasons why Moose is So Damned Important, how it makes our jobs easier, and how it makes Perl viable for larger development groups. '
tags:
- drugs
- managers
- moose
- rocknroll
- sex
title: Moose for Managers
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1878
session_B:
duration: 50
speaker: Nicholas Perez (nperez)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1719
talk:
comment: ' IKC enables disparate POE::Kernel instances to communicate via TCP and allows posting to remote sessions as if they were local. POE::Component::PubSub enables a registry of events to which sessions can publish events and to which other sessions can subscribe allowing easy broadcasting and interface definition. Combine these two components into the Voltron of dynamic application servers where services and consumers can be added without taking down the core service. Discusses a working example of a simple application server hosting a simple host monitoring application with a client '
tags:
- application
- component
- host
- ikc
- monitoring
- poe
- pubsub
- server
- voltron
title: POE::Component::IKC + POE::Component::PubSub = Voltron
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1927
session_C:
duration: 20
speaker: Mark Keating (mdk/markie)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/1857
talk:
comment: ' Modern Perl projects and their surrounding communities have developed in the years since the release of Perl 5.0: the continuing evolution of Perl into a more object orientated language; the growth of projects creating features developed for the, as yet unreleased, Perl 6 to enhance Perl 5; the practice of looking at other languages and learning from them; the culture of stable, test-driven releases that have more compatibility with their predecessors; are some of the features of this development. This talk will give an introduction to the idea of an Enlightened Perl and the Enlightened Perl Organisation and its aims. It will discuss the importance of uniting corporate with community and how this affects the development process. The presentation is not a technical discussion it is a cultural perspective. '
tags:
- business
- community
- corporate
- enlightened
- epo
- perl
title: 'What is Enlightened Perl? What is the Enlightened Perl Organisation?'
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1894
session_D:
duration: 20
speaker: Barbie
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/230
talk:
comment: " How the YAPC Conference Surveys are run, and a look at past surveys to see how attendees have reviewed previous conferences. If you're interested getting a taste of some of the thoughts of the European Perl community, or are interested in putting together a similar type of survey, then this talk is for you. "
tags:
- survey
- yapc
title: Surveying a YAPC
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1919
time: 11:10AM
- session_A: {}
session_B: {}
session_C: {}
session_D:
duration: 50
speaker: R Geoffrey Avery (rGeoffrey)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/232
talk:
comment: " Accepted Lightning Talks: * lukec - ‎Webhooks‎ * Scott Walters (‎scrottie‎) - ‎Righting Inside-Out Objects‎ * talk:2006 * Doug Bell (‎preaction‎) - ‎Vim as a Perl IDE‎ * John Beppu - ‎A COMET server implemented with Squatting and Continuity‎ * David Bury - ‎MooseX::Documenter‎ * Jay Hannah (‎jhannah‎) - ‎MooseX::Workers‎ * Ilia Lobsanov - ‎Continuous Integration for Perl‎ * Jesse Luehrs (‎doy‎) - ‎Botting NetHack with TAEB‎ * Steve Scaffidi (‎Hercynium‎) - ‎Website testing is tedious. Automate it!‎ * Zak Zebrowski - ‎Perl && Arduino‎ * Rob Kinyon - ‎Converting huge apps from Class::DBI to DBIx::Class‎ * Brad Cavanagh (‎CanSpice‎) - ‎Astronomical T&A thanks to Perl‎ * Rick Scott (‎shadowspar‎) - ‎Growing the Perl Hackers of tomorrow (or, \"Hook 'em while they're young\")‎ * Darcy Whyte - ‎Elastic Band Powered Airplane‎ * Todd Olson - ‎Measurement Driven Life: Reversing the Health Destroying Effects of Perl Programming‎ * Matt Trout - ‎Rum, bloggery and the lash‎ * Jeff Horwitz - ‎The LOLCAT History of Perl 6 and Parrot‎ Speakers, If you are accepted, please edit your talk here on the website to either check the confirm box if you will give your talk or uncheck the accepted box if you would like to not speak. Please arrive 15 minutes before the talks start and we will have reserved seating for speakers in the front row. If there are any questions please ask rGeoffrey on IRC or in person. --- Why Would You Want to do a Lightning Talk? Maybe you've never given a talk before, and you'd like to start small. For a Lightning Talk, you don't need to make slides, and if you do decide to make slides, you only need to make three. Maybe you're nervous and you're afraid you'll mess up. It's a lot easier to plan and deliver a five minute talk than it is to deliver a long talk. And if you do mess up, at least the painful part will be over quickly. Maybe you don't have much to say. Maybe you just want to ask a question, or invite people to help you with your project, or boast about something you did, or tell a short cautionary story. These things are all interesting and worth talking about, but there might not be enough to say about them to fill up thirty minutes. Maybe you have a lot of things to say, and you're already going to give a long talk on one of them, and you don't want to hog the spotlight. There's nothing wrong with giving several Lightning Talks. Hey, they're only five minutes. On the other side, people might want to come to a lightning talk when they wouldn't come to a long talk on the same subject. The risk for the attendees is smaller: If the talk turns out to be dull, or if the person giving the talk turns out to be a really bad speaker, well, at least it's over in five minutes. With lightning talks, you're never stuck in some boring lecture for forty-five minutes. Still having trouble picking a topic, here are some suggestions: 1. Why my favorite module is X. 2. I want to do cool project X. Does anyone want to help? 3. Successful Project: I did project X. It was a success. Here's how you could benefit. 4. Failed Project: I did project X. It was a failure, and here's why. 5. Heresy: People always say X, but they're wrong. Here's why. 6. You All Suck: Here's what is wrong with the our community. 7. Call to Action: Let's all do more of X / less of X. 8. Wouldn't it be cool if X? 9. Someone needs to do X. 10. Wish List 11. Why X was a mistake. 12. Why X looks like a mistake, but isn't. 13. What it's like to do X. 14. Here's a useful technique that worked. 15. Here's a technique I thought would be useful but didn't work. 16. Why algorithm X sucks. 17. Comparison of algorithms X and Y. Of course, you could give the talk on anything you wanted, whether or not it is on this list. If we get a full schedule of nothing but five minutes of ranting and raving on each topic, a good time will still be had by most. "
title: Lightning Talks Round 1
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/1821
time: 01:00PM
- session_A: {}
session_B: {}
session_C: {}
session_D:
duration: 50
speaker: R Geoffrey Avery (rGeoffrey)
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/user/232
talk:
comment: " For the schedule is available see:R Geoffrey Avery (‎rGeoffrey‎) - ‎Lightning Talks Round 1‎ Why Would You Want to do a Lightning Talk? Maybe you've never given a talk before, and you'd like to start small. For a Lightning Talk, you don't need to make slides, and if you do decide to make slides, you only need to make three. Maybe you're nervous and you're afraid you'll mess up. It's a lot easier to plan and deliver a five minute talk than it is to deliver a long talk. And if you do mess up, at least the painful part will be over quickly. Maybe you don't have much to say. Maybe you just want to ask a question, or invite people to help you with your project, or boast about something you did, or tell a short cautionary story. These things are all interesting and worth talking about, but there might not be enough to say about them to fill up thirty minutes. Maybe you have a lot of things to say, and you're already going to give a long talk on one of them, and you don't want to hog the spotlight. There's nothing wrong with giving several Lightning Talks. Hey, they're only five minutes. On the other side, people might want to come to a lightning talk when they wouldn't come to a long talk on the same subject. The risk for the attendees is smaller: If the talk turns out to be dull, or if the person giving the talk turns out to be a really bad speaker, well, at least it's over in five minutes. With lightning talks, you're never stuck in some boring lecture for forty-five minutes. Still having trouble picking a topic, here are some suggestions: 1. Why my favorite module is X. 2. I want to do cool project X. Does anyone want to help? 3. Successful Project: I did project X. It was a success. Here's how you could benefit. 4. Failed Project: I did project X. It was a failure, and here's why. 5. Heresy: People always say X, but they're wrong. Here's why. 6. You All Suck: Here's what is wrong with the our community. 7. Call to Action: Let's all do more of X / less of X. 8. Wouldn't it be cool if X? 9. Someone needs to do X. 10. Wish List 11. Why X was a mistake. 12. Why X looks like a mistake, but isn't. 13. What it's like to do X. 14. Here's a useful technique that worked. 15. Here's a technique I thought would be useful but didn't work. 16. Why algorithm X sucks. 17. Comparison of algorithms X and Y. Of course, you could give the talk on anything you wanted, whether or not it is on this list. If we get a full schedule of nothing but five minutes of ranting and raving on each topic, a good time will still be had by most. "
title: Lightning Talks Round 2
talk_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/talk/2104
time: 01:50PM
- session_A: {}
session_B: {}
session_C: {}
session_D:
duration: 130
speaker: Closing
speaker_url: http://yapc10.org/yn2009/event/545
time: 02:50PM