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AWS SDK v3 Client mock

Easy and powerful mocking of AWS SDK v3 Clients.

npm aws-sdk-client-mock npm aws-sdk-client-mock-jest

Library recommended by the AWS SDK for JavaScript team - see the introductory post on the AWS blog.

Features:

  • ๐ŸŒŠย  fluent interface - declaring behavior is short and readable
  • ๐Ÿ”ย  matching options - defining mock behavior by Command type and/or its input payload
  • ๐Ÿ•ต๏ธย  spying - checking if Commands were actually sent
  • ๐Ÿƒย  Jest matchers - easily verifying sent Commands
  • ๐Ÿ–‹๏ธย  fully typed - same type control for declaring mock's behavior as when writing regular code
  • โœ…ย  fully tested - reliable mocks help instead of impeding

In action:

aws-client-mock-example

Table of Contents

About AWS SDK v3

The AWS SDK for JavaScript version 3, is the new version of SDK to use in Node.js and browser. It comes with modular architecture and improved typing, thanks to being written in TypeScript.

The recommended way of using it is to create a Client and use it to send Commands.

For example, using SNS Client to publish a message to a topic looks like that:

import {PublishCommand, SNSClient} from '@aws-sdk/client-sns';

const sns = new SNSClient({});
const result = await sns.send(new PublishCommand({
  TopicArn: 'arn:aws:sns:us-east-1:111111111111:MyTopic',
  Message: 'My message',
}));

console.log(`Message published, id: ${result.MessageId}`);

This library provides an easy way to mock sending Commands and define returned results depending on the Command type and payload.

Usage

Install

npm install -D aws-sdk-client-mock

Warning
If you are getting type errors Argument of type 'typeof SomeClient' is not assignable to parameter of type... see instructions here.

Versions compatibility

@aws-sdk/* aws-sdk-client-mock
โ‰ฅ 3.363.0 3.x
< 3.363.0 2.x

Import

CommonJS:

const {mockClient} = require('aws-sdk-client-mock');

TypeScript / ES6:

import {mockClient} from 'aws-sdk-client-mock';

Mock

Create mock for all instances or for given instance of the AWS SDK Client:

const snsMock = mockClient(SNSClient);

const dynamoDB = new DynamoDBClient({});
const dynamoDBMock = mockClient(dynamoDB);

By default, mocked Client#send() method returns undefined.

Using the obtained mock instance, you can specify the mock behavior on receiving various commands to send.

See the AwsStub API Reference for all available methods or check out the examples below.

Specify default mock behavior:

snsMock.onAnyCommand().resolves({});

// same as:

snsMock.resolves({});

Specify mock behavior on receiving given command only:

snsMock
    .on(PublishCommand)
    .resolves({
        MessageId: '12345678-1111-2222-3333-111122223333',
    });

Specify mock behavior on receiving given command with given payload only:

snsMock
    .on(PublishCommand, {
        TopicArn: 'arn:aws:sns:us-east-1:111111111111:MyTopic',
        Message: 'My message',
    })
    .resolves({
        MessageId: '12345678-4444-5555-6666-111122223333',
    });

Not all payload parameters must be defined to match (you can force strict matching by passing third param strict: true):

snsMock
    .on(PublishCommand, {
        Message: 'My message',
    })
    .resolves({
        MessageId: '12345678-4444-5555-6666-111122223333',
    });

Specify mock behavior on receiving given payload only:

snsMock
    .onAnyCommand({
        TopicArn: 'arn:aws:sns:us-east-1:111111111111:MyTopic',
        Message: 'My message',
    })
    .resolves({
        MessageId: '12345678-4444-5555-6666-111122223333',
    });

Multiple behaviors (for different commands and payloads) may be specified for a single mock:

snsMock
    .resolves({ // default for any command
        MessageId: '12345678-1111-2222-3333-111122223333'
    })
    .on(PublishCommand)
    .resolves({ // default for PublishCommand
        MessageId: '12345678-4444-5555-6666-111122223333'
    })
    .on(PublishCommand, {
        TopicArn: 'arn:aws:sns:us-east-1:111111111111:MyTopic',
        Message: 'My message',
    })
    .resolves({ // for PublishCommand with given input
        MessageId: '12345678-7777-8888-9999-111122223333',
    });

Specify chained behaviors - next behaviors for consecutive calls:

snsMock
    .on(PublishCommand)
    .resolvesOnce({ // for the first command call
        MessageId: '12345678-1111-1111-1111-111122223333'
    })
    .resolvesOnce({ // for the second command call
        MessageId: '12345678-2222-2222-2222-111122223333'
    })
    .resolves({ // for further calls
        MessageId: '12345678-3333-3333-3333-111122223333'
    });

Specify mock throwing an error:

snsMock
    .rejects('mocked rejection');

Specify custom mock function:

snsMock
    .callsFake(input => {
        if (input.Message === 'My message') {
            return {MessageId: '12345678-1111-2222-3333-111122223333'};
        } else {
            throw new Error('mocked rejection');
        }
    });

Specify custom mock function for a specific command (chained behavior):

snsMock
    .on(PublishCommand)
    .callsFake(input => {
        if (input.Message === 'My message') {
            return {MessageId: '12345678-1111-2222-3333-111122223333'};
        } else {
            throw new Error('mocked rejection');
        }
    });

Specify result based on Client configuration, i.e. region:

snsMock
    .on(PublishCommand)
    .callsFake(async (input, getClient) => {
        const client = getClient();
        const region = await client.config.region();
        return {MessageId: region.substring(0, 2)};
    });

Together with resolvesOnce(), you can also use rejectsOnce() and callsFakeOnce() to specify consecutive behaviors.

DynamoDB DocumentClient

You can mock the DynamoDBDocumentClient just like any other Client:

import {DynamoDBClient} from '@aws-sdk/client-dynamodb';
import {DynamoDBDocumentClient, QueryCommand} from '@aws-sdk/lib-dynamodb';

const ddbMock = mockClient(DynamoDBDocumentClient);
ddbMock.on(QueryCommand).resolves({
    Items: [{pk: 'a', sk: 'b'}],
});

const dynamodb = new DynamoDBClient({});
const ddb = DynamoDBDocumentClient.from(dynamodb);

const query = await ddb.send(new QueryCommand({
  TableName: 'mock',
}));

Lib Storage Upload

To mock @aws-sdk/lib-storage Upload you need to mock at least two commands: CreateMultipartUploadCommand and UploadPartCommand used under the hood:

import {S3Client, CreateMultipartUploadCommand, UploadPartCommand} from '@aws-sdk/client-s3';
import {Upload} from "@aws-sdk/lib-storage";

const s3Mock = mockClient(S3Client);
s3Mock.on(CreateMultipartUploadCommand).resolves({UploadId: '1'});
s3Mock.on(UploadPartCommand).resolves({ETag: '1'});

const s3Upload = new Upload({
    client: new S3Client({}),
    params: {
        Bucket: 'mock',
        Key: 'test',
        Body: 'x'.repeat(6 * 1024 * 1024), // 6 MB
    },
});

s3Upload.on('httpUploadProgress', (progress) => {
    console.log(progress);
});

await s3Upload.done();

This way, the Upload#done() will complete successfuly.

To cause a failure, you need to specify the rejects() behavior for one of the AWS SDK Commands used by the @aws-sdk/lib-storage.

For uploading a small file (under the defined multipart upload single part size), lib-storage sends a PutObjectCommand. To make it fail:

s3Mock.on(PutObjectCommand).rejects();

For bigger files, it makes a series of calls including CreateMultipartUploadCommand, UploadPartCommand, and CompleteMultipartUploadCommand. Making any of them fail will fail the upload:

s3Mock.on(UploadPartCommand).rejects();

S3 GetObjectCommand

AWS SDK wraps the stream in the S3 GetObjectCommand result to provide utility methods to parse it. To mock it, you need to install the @smithy/util-stream package and call the wrapping function sdkStreamMixin() on the stream you provide as the command output:

import {GetObjectCommand, S3Client} from '@aws-sdk/client-s3';
import {sdkStreamMixin} from '@smithy/util-stream';
import {mockClient} from 'aws-sdk-client-mock';
import {Readable} from 'stream';
import {createReadStream} from 'fs';

const s3Mock = mockClient(S3Client);

it('mocks get object', async () => {
    // create Stream from string
    const stream = new Readable();
    stream.push('hello world');
    stream.push(null); // end of stream

    // alternatively: create Stream from file
    // const stream = createReadStream('./test/data.txt');

    // wrap the Stream with SDK mixin
    const sdkStream = sdkStreamMixin(stream);

    s3Mock.on(GetObjectCommand).resolves({Body: sdkStream});

    const s3 = new S3Client({});

    const getObjectResult = await s3.send(new GetObjectCommand({Bucket: '', Key: ''}));

    const str = await getObjectResult.Body?.transformToString();

    expect(str).toBe('hello world');
});

Paginated operations

To mock a paginated operation results, simply mock the corresponding Command:

import {DynamoDBClient, paginateQuery, QueryCommand} from '@aws-sdk/client-dynamodb';
import {marshall} from '@aws-sdk/util-dynamodb';

const dynamodbMock = mockClient(DynamoDBClient);
dynamodbMock.on(QueryCommand).resolves({
    Items: [
        marshall({pk: 'a', sk: 'b'}),
        marshall({pk: 'c', sk: 'd'}),
    ],
});

const dynamodb = new DynamoDBClient({});
const paginator = paginateQuery({client: dynamodb}, {TableName: 'mock'});

const items = [];
for await (const page of paginator) {
    items.push(...page.Items || []);
}

SDK v2-style mocks

The AWS SDK v3 gives an option to use it similarly to v2 SDK, with command method call instead of send():

import {SNS} from '@aws-sdk/client-sns';

const sns = new SNS({});
const result = await sns.publish({
    TopicArn: 'arn:aws:sns:us-east-1:111111111111:MyTopic',
    Message: 'My message',
});

Although this approach is not recommended by AWS, those calls can be mocked in the standard way:

import {PublishCommand, SNSClient} from '@aws-sdk/client-sns';

const snsMock = mockClient(SNSClient);
snsMock
    .on(PublishCommand)
    .resolves({
        MessageId: '12345678-1111-2222-3333-111122223333',
    });

Notice that in mocks you still need to use SNSClient, not SNS, as well as Command classes.

Inspect

Inspect received calls:

snsMock.calls(); // all received calls
snsMock.call(0); // first received call

Get calls of a specified command:

snsMock.commandCalls(PublishCommand)

Get calls of a specified command with given payload (you can force strict matching by passing third param strict: true):

snsMock.commandCalls(PublishCommand, {Message: 'My message'})

Under the hood, the library uses Sinon.js stub. You can get the stub instance to configure and use it directly:

const snsSendStub = snsMock.send;

Reset and restore

The Client mock exposes three Sinon.js stub methods: reset(), resetHistory(), and restore().

The reset() method resets the mock state and behavior. The Client will continue to be mocked, only now with a clean mock instance, without any behavior (set with methods like on(...).resolves(...)) and calls history.

You should call clientMock.reset() before or after every test (using beforeEach() / beforeAll() from your test framework) to keep tests independent from each other.

The resetHistory() only clear mocked client calls history that you access with mockedClient.call(...) and mockedClient.calls(). The behavior is preserved.

The restore() removes the mock altogether, restoring the normal behavior of client.send().

You can also pass custom Sinon Sandbox with mockClient(client, { sandbox: mySandbox }) to manage all mocks lifecycle at once.

Jest matchers

Custom Jest matchers simplify verification that the mocked Client was called with given Commands.

Matchers are published as a separate package. Install it:

yarn add -D aws-sdk-client-mock-jest
# or:
npm install -D aws-sdk-client-mock-jest

Usage (notice the import):

import 'aws-sdk-client-mock-jest';

// a PublishCommand was sent to SNS
expect(snsMock).toHaveReceivedCommand(PublishCommand);

// Any command was sent to SNS
expect(snsMock).toHaveReceivedAnyCommand();

// two PublishCommands were sent to SNS
expect(snsMock).toHaveReceivedCommandTimes(PublishCommand, 2);

// a PublishCommand with Message "My message" was sent to SNS
expect(snsMock).toHaveReceivedCommandWith(PublishCommand, {Message: 'My message'});

// the second command sent to SNS is a PublishCommand with Message "My message"
expect(snsMock).toHaveReceivedNthCommandWith(2, PublishCommand, {Message: 'My message'});

// the second PublishCommand sent to SNS has Message "My message"
expect(snsMock).toHaveReceivedNthSpecificCommandWith(2, PublishCommand, {Message: 'My message'});

Shorter aliases exist, like toReceiveCommandTimes().

To use those matchers with Vitest, set test.globals to true in vite.config.js (see #139).

To use the matchers outside of Jest, you can pull in the expect library separately and add it to the global scope directly, e.g.:

const {expect} = require("expect");
(globalThis as any).expect = expect;
require("aws-sdk-client-mock-jest");

API Reference

See the full API Reference.

AWS Lambda example

Example below uses Jest as a test framework, but mocks will work with any testing library.

Let's take a simple Lambda function that takes a list of messages, sends them to SNS topic and returns message IDs:

import {PublishCommand, SNSClient} from '@aws-sdk/client-sns';

const snsTopicArn = process.env.SNS_TOPIC_ARN || '';

const sns = new SNSClient({});

export const handler = async (event: Event): Promise<string[]> => {
  const promises = event.messages.map(async (msg, idx) => {
    const publish = await sns.send(new PublishCommand({
      TopicArn: snsTopicArn,
      Message: msg,
    }));
    return publish.MessageId!;
  });

  return await Promise.all(promises);
};

interface Event {
  messages: string[];
}

Then the tests could look like this:

import {mockClient} from 'aws-sdk-client-mock';
import {PublishCommand, SNSClient} from '@aws-sdk/client-sns';
import {handler} from '../src';

const snsMock = mockClient(SNSClient);

/**
 * To be sure that unit tests are independent from each other,
 * reset mock behavior between the tests.
 */
beforeEach(() => {
  snsMock.reset();
});

it('message IDs are returned', async () => {
  snsMock.on(PublishCommand).resolves({
    MessageId: '12345678-1111-2222-3333-111122223333',
  });

  const result = await handler({
    messages: ['one', 'two', 'three']
  });

  expect(result).toHaveLength(3);
  expect(result[0]).toBe('12345678-1111-2222-3333-111122223333');
});

it('SNS Client is called with PublishCommand', async () => {
  snsMock.on(PublishCommand).resolves({
    MessageId: '111-222-333',
  });

  await handler({
    messages: ['qq', 'xx']
  });

  expect(snsMock).toHaveReceivedCommandTimes(PublishCommand, 2);
});

For more examples, see the unit tests.

Caveats

Mixed @smithy/types versions

Note
Those instructions refer to @smithy/types used by AWS SDK v3.363.0 and above. For version below 3.363.0, perform the same steps for the @aws-sdk/types package.

If you have multiple versions of @smithy/types installed in your project, you can get type errors similar to this:

TS2345: Argument of type 'typeof DynamoDBDocumentClient' is not assignable to parameter of type 'InstanceOrClassType<Client<ServiceInputTypes, MetadataBearer, any>>'.
  Type 'typeof DynamoDBDocumentClient' is not assignable to type 'ClassType<Client<ServiceInputTypes, MetadataBearer, any>>'.
    The types of 'prototype.middlewareStack.concat' are incompatible between these types.
      Type '<InputType extends ServiceInputTypes, OutputType extends ServiceOutputTypes>(from: MiddlewareStack<InputType, OutputType>) => MiddlewareStack<...>' is not assignable to type '<InputType extends ServiceInputTypes, OutputType extends MetadataBearer>(from: MiddlewareStack<InputType, OutputType>) => MiddlewareStack<InputType, OutputType>'.
        Types of parameters 'from' and 'from' are incompatible.
          Property 'identify' is missing in type 'MiddlewareStack<InputType, OutputType>' but required in type 'MiddlewareStack<InputType, ServiceOutputTypes>'.

Run npm ls @smithy/types / pnpm why @smithy/types / yarn why @smithy/types and check if you have more than one version of the package installed.

To solve this, go through the steps until one works:

  • make sure all your @aws-sdk/* packages point to the same version,
  • remove all @aws-sdk/* packages from package.json, run npm install / pnpm install / yarn install, restore @aws-sdk/* packages in package.json, and run install again,
  • add @smithy/types to your dev dependencies in the latest version,
  • force using single @smithy/types version with npm overrides, pnpm overrides, or yarn resolutions,
  • if nothing else helped, open an issue including the output of npm ls @smithy/types / pnpm why @smithy/types / yarn why @smithy/types.

AwsClientStub and strictFunctionTypes

If you need to explicitly type the mock variable, you can use AwsClientStub type:

import {AwsClientStub, mockClient} from 'aws-sdk-client-mock'
import {S3Client} from "@aws-sdk/client-s3";

const mock: AwsClientStub<S3Client> = mockClient(S3Client);

The AwsClientStub type works only with tsconfig option strictFunctionTypes=true or (strict=true) in tsconfig.json file.

See details in #167.

Order of mock behaviors

Wider Command matchers must be declared first, otherwise, they will take precedence over previous ones.

In this case, all PublishCommand sends will return message ID 222:

snsMock
  .on(PublishCommand, myInput).resolves({MessageId: '111'})
  .on(PublishCommand).resolves({MessageId: '222'});

If the order of the declarations is switched, sends with input matching myInput will return ID 111 and all others 222.

It works similarly with onAnyCommand().

Order of type and instance mocks

When you create both a Client type mock and a specific Client instance mock(s), you need to declare type mock last. Otherwise, the other instances will not be mocked.

Right now if you create a mock for the Client type, and then mock a specific instance of this Client, with the order of mocking as here:

const sns1 = new SNSClient({}); // not mocked

mockClient(SNSClient).resolves({MessageId: '123'});

const sns2 = new SNSClient({}); // mocked
mockClient(sns2).resolves({MessageId: '456'});

const sns3 = new SNSClient({}); // not mocked

Declaring mocks in this order will fix it:

const sns1 = new SNSClient({}); // mocked - default

const sns2 = new SNSClient({}); // mocked
mockClient(sns2).resolves({MessageId: '456'});

mockClient(SNSClient).resolves({MessageId: '123'});

const sns3 = new SNSClient({}); // mocked - default

PRs to fix this are welcome.

Using with Mocha

When testing with Mocha, call mockClient() in the beforeEach() method, not in the global scope, to prevent overriding the mock between test files. See this for more details.