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GitHub Action

Release Drafter

v5.6.1 Latest version
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Release Drafter

Drafts your next release notes as pull requests are merged into master

Installation

Copy and paste the following snippet into your .yml file.

- name: Release Drafter
  uses: release-drafter/release-drafter@v5.6.1
Learn more about this action in release-drafter/release-drafter
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Release Drafter Logo

Drafts your next release notes as pull requests are merged into master. Built with Probot.


Usage

You can use the Release Drafter GitHub Action in a GitHub Actions Workflow by configuring a YAML-based workflow file, e.g. .github/workflows/release-drafter.yml, with the following:

name: Release Drafter

on:
  push:
    # branches to consider in the event; optional, defaults to all
    branches:
      - master

jobs:
  update_release_draft:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      # Drafts your next Release notes as Pull Requests are merged into "master"
      - uses: release-drafter/release-drafter@v5
        with:
          # (Optional) specify config name to use, relative to .github/. Default: release-drafter.yml
          # config-name: my-config.yml
        env:
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}

If you're unable to use GitHub Actions, you can use the Release Drafter GitHub App. Please refer to the Release Drafter GitHub App documentation for more information.

Configuration

Once you’ve added Release Drafter to your repository, it must be enabled by adding a .github/release-drafter.yml configuration file to each repository.

Example

For example, take the following .github/release-drafter.yml file in a repository:

template: |
  ## What’s Changed

  $CHANGES

As pull requests are merged, a draft release is kept up-to-date listing the changes, ready to publish when you’re ready:

Screenshot of generated draft release

The following is a more complicated configuration, which categorises the changes into headings, and automatically suggests the next version number:

name-template: 'v$NEXT_PATCH_VERSION 🌈'
tag-template: 'v$NEXT_PATCH_VERSION'
categories:
  - title: '🚀 Features'
    labels:
      - 'feature'
      - 'enhancement'
  - title: '🐛 Bug Fixes'
    labels:
      - 'fix'
      - 'bugfix'
      - 'bug'
  - title: '🧰 Maintenance'
    label: 'chore'
change-template: '- $TITLE @$AUTHOR (#$NUMBER)'
template: |
  ## Changes

  $CHANGES

Configuration Options

You can configure Release Drafter using the following key in your .github/release-drafter.yml file:

Key Required Description
template Required The template for the body of the draft release. Use template variables to insert values.
name-template Optional The template for the name of the draft release. For example: "v$NEXT_PATCH_VERSION".
tag-template Optional The template for the tag of the draft release. For example: "v$NEXT_PATCH_VERSION".
version-template Optional The template to use when calculating the next version number for the release. Useful for projects that don't use semantic versioning. Default: "$MAJOR.$MINOR.$PATCH"
change-template Optional The template to use for each merged pull request. Use change template variables to insert values. Default: "* $TITLE (#$NUMBER) @$AUTHOR".
no-changes-template Optional The template to use for when there’s no changes. Default: "* No changes".
branches Optional The branches to listen for configuration updates to .github/release-drafter.yml and for merge commits. Useful if you want to test the app on a pull request branch. Default is the repository’s default branch.
categories Optional Categorize pull requests using labels. Refer to Categorize Pull Requests to learn more about this option.
exclude-labels Optional Exclude pull requests using labels. Refer to Exclude Pull Requests to learn more about this option.
replacers Optional Search and replace content in the generated changelog body. Refer to Replacers to learn more about this option.
sort-by Optional Sort changelog by merged_at or title. Can be one of: merged_at, title. Default: merged_at.
sort-direction Optional Sort changelog in ascending or descending order. Can be one of: ascending, descending. Default: descending.
prerelease Optional Mark the draft release as pre-release. Default false.

Release Drafter also supports Probot Config, if you want to store your configuration files in a central repository. This allows you to share configurations between projects, and create a organization-wide configuration file by creating a repository named .github with the file .github/release-drafter.yml.

Template Variables

You can use any of the following variables in your template:

Variable Description
$CHANGES The markdown list of pull requests that have been merged.
$CONTRIBUTORS A comma separated list of contributors to this release (pull request authors, commit authors, and commit committers).
$PREVIOUS_TAG The previous releases’s tag.

Next Version Variables

You can use any of the following variables in your template, name-template and tag-template:

Variable Description
$NEXT_PATCH_VERSION The next patch version number. For example, if the last tag or release was v1.2.3, the value would be v1.2.4. This is the most commonly used value.
$NEXT_MINOR_VERSION The next minor version number. For example, if the last tag or release was v1.2.3, the value would be v1.3.0.
$NEXT_MAJOR_VERSION The next major version number. For example, if the last tag or release was v1.2.3, the value would be v2.0.0.

Version Template Variables

You can use any of the following variables in version-template to format the $NEXT_{PATCH,MINOR,MAJOR}_VERSION variables:

Variable Description
$PATCH The patch version number.
$MINOR The minor version number.
$MAJOR The major version number.

Change Template Variables

You can use any of the following variables in change-template:

Variable Description
$NUMBER The number of the pull request, e.g. 42.
$TITLE The title of the pull request, e.g. Add alien technology.
$AUTHOR The pull request author’s username, e.g. gracehopper.

Categorize Pull Requests

With the categories option you can categorize pull requests in release notes using labels. For example, append the following to your .github/release-drafter.yml file:

categories:
  - title: '🚀 Features'
    label: 'feature'
  - title: '🐛 Bug Fixes'
    labels:
      - 'fix'
      - 'bugfix'
      - 'bug'

Pull requests with the label "feature" or "fix" will now be grouped together:

Screenshot of generated draft release with categories

Adding such labels to your PRs can be automated by using PR Labeler or Probot Auto Labeler.

Exclude Pull Requests

With the exclude-labels option you can exclude pull requests from the release notes using labels. For example, append the following to your .github/release-drafter.yml file:

exclude-labels:
  - 'skip-changelog'

Pull requests with the label "skip-changelog" will now be excluded from the release draft.

Replacers

You can search and replace content in the generated changelog body, using regular expressions, with the replacers option. Each replacer is applied in order.

replacers:
  - search: '/CVE-(\d{4})-(\d+)/g'
    replace: 'https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-$1-$2'
  - search: 'myname'
    replace: 'My Name'

Projects that don't use Semantic Versioning

If your project doesn't follow Semantic Versioning you can still use Release Drafter, but you may want to set the version-template option to customize how the $NEXT_{PATCH,MINOR,MAJOR}_VERSION environment variables are generated.

For example, if your project doesn't use patch version numbers, you can set version-template to $MAJOR.$MINOR. If the current release is version 1.0, then $NEXT_MINOR_VERSION will be 1.1.

Action Outputs

The Release Drafter GitHub Action sets a couple of outputs which can be used as inputs to other Actions in the workflow (example).

Output Description
id The ID of the release that was created or updated.
html_url The URL users can navigate to in order to view the release. i.e. https://github.com/octocat/Hello-World/releases/v1.0.0.
upload_url The URL for uploading assets to the release, which could be used by GitHub Actions for additional uses, for example the @actions/upload-release-asset GitHub Action.

Developing

If you have Node v10+ installed locally, you can run the tests, and a local app, using the following commands:

# Install dependencies
yarn

# Run the tests
npm test

# Run the app locally
npm run dev

Once you've started the app, visit localhost:3000 and you'll get step-by-step instructions for installing it in your GitHub account so you can start pushing commits and testing it locally.

If you don’t have Node installed, you can use Docker Compose:

# Run the tests
docker-compose run --rm app npm test

Contributing

Third-party contributions are welcome! 🙏🏼 See CONTRIBUTING.md for step-by-step instructions.

If you need help or have a question, let me know via a GitHub issue.

Deployment

If you want to deploy your own copy of Release Drafter, follow the Probot Deployment Guide.

Releasing

Run the following command:

git checkout master && git pull && npm version [major | minor | patch]

The command does the following:

  • Ensures you’re on master and don’t have local, un-commited changes
  • Bumps the version number in package.json based on major, minor or patch
  • Runs the postversion npm script in package.json, which:
    • Pushes the tag to GitHub
    • Publishes the npm release
    • Deploys to Now
    • Opens the GitHub releases page so you can publish the release notes
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