Skip to content

HTTPS clone URL

Subversion checkout URL

You can clone with HTTPS or Subversion.

Download ZIP
Ruby
branch: master

Fetching latest commit…

Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time

Failed to load latest commit information.
examples
lib
spec
.gitignore
.rspec
Gemfile
README.md
Rakefile
harvester.gemspec

README.md

Harvester

Parse complex HTML structures using powerful DSL.

Synopsis

require 'pp'
require 'harvester'

article = <<-EOF
<html>
<head><title>Test article title</title></head>
<body>
  <h1>Test article header</h1>
  <article>
    <section>
      <h2>Header 1</h2>
      <p>Paragraph 1</p>
    </section>
    <section>
      <h2>Header 2</h2>
      <p>Paragraph 2</p>
    </section>
    <div id="author-block">
      <span class="name">John Doe</span>
      <a href="/authors/1">profile</a>
      <a href="http://twitter.com/johndoe">twitter</a>
    </div>
  </article>
</body>
EOF

harvester = Harvester.new do |h|
  h.element :title, :selectors => "title"
  h.element :header, :selectors => "h1"
  h.children :sections, :selectors => "article > section" do |s|
    s.element :header, :selectors => "h2"
    s.element :body, :selectors => "p"
  end
  h.child :author, :selectors => "div#author-block" do |a|
    a.element :name, :selectors => "span.name"
    a.link :profile, :selectors => "a", :link_regex => %r{^/authors/\d+$}
    a.link :twitter, :selectors => "a", :link_regex => %r{twitter.com}
  end
end


pp harvester.parse(article)
# {:title=>"Test article title",
#  :header=>"Test article header",
#  :sections=>
#   [{:header=>"Header 1", :body=>"Paragraph 1"},
#    {:header=>"Header 2", :body=>"Paragraph 2"}],
#  :author=>
#   {:name=>"John Doe",
#    :profile=>"/authors/1",
#    :twitter=>"http://twitter.com/johndoe"}}

See other examples in examples folder.

Available parsers

Almost all parsers accept selector or selectors option which specifies CSS or XPath selector they will use. XPath syntax is used when selectors start with '/', '//' or './'. CSS in all the other cases.

You can pass an array of selectors.

Primitives

element

Extracts text for elements matching given selector:

harvester = Harvester.new do |h|
  h.element :title, :selector => "h1"
end

harvester.parse("<h1>Hello</h1>")
# => {:title => "Hello"}

link

Finds a link matching given selector and href regex. Its href is returned.

harvester = Harvester.new do |h|
  h.link :github, :link_regex => /github/
end

harvester.parse("<a href='/'>Home</a> <a href='https://github.com'>Github</a>")
# => {:github => 'https://github.com'}

links

Links parser is the same thing, only it returns all matching links instead of the first one.

link_with_uid

This is a tricky one. Returns a hash containing two keys: :url for link href and :uid for link unique id. uid is used to generate a string from url query values. For example, if url is /x.php?id=1&sid=abcde&player=2, and you use ['id', 'player'] for uid generation, your resulting uid is "1_2" (that's 1 and 2 joined by underscores). Ordering doesn't matter. Also note, that your url is then normalized using the same params, so it becomes /x.php?id=1&player=2

harvester = Harvester.new do |h|
  h.link_with_uid :hero_code, :link_regex => /x.php/, :uid_keep_params => ["id", "player"]
end
harvester.parse("<a href='/x.php?id=1&sid=abcde&player=2'>player</a>")
# => {:hero_code => {:url => '/x.php?id=1&player=2', :uid => "1_2"}}

links_with_uid

Same as the previous one, but returns an array of links.

date

Extracts and parses whatever looks as date. You must specify a regex for text matching (sometimes you can get away with /(.*)/).

harvester = Harvester.new do |h|
  h.date :published_at, :selector => "span.time", :regex => /^Published at: (.*)$/
end

harvester.parse("<span class='time'>Published at: 01/25/2012 05:00</span>")
# => {:published_at => 2012-01-25 05:00:00 UTC }

Relative parsers

child

Runs a parser inside of your parser, creating nested structure.

harvester = Harvester.new do |h|
  h.child :author, :selector => "div#author" do |a|
    a.element :name, :selector => "span.name"
  end
end
harvester.parse("<div id='author'><span class='name'>John Doe</span></div>")
# => {:author => {:name => "John Doe"}}

children

Same as child, but returns an array of hashes.

prev_sibling, next_sibling, parent

Sometimes you need to move slightly around the DOM tree. This is what these three parsers are for.

Attention: these parsers do not nest, but they merge directly into the parent parser.

harvester = Harvester.new do |h|
  h.child :post, :selector => "div.post" do |p|
    p.prev_sibling :selector => "div.info" do |i|
      i.element :title, :selector => "h1"
    end
  end
end
harvester.parse("<div class='info'><h1>Hello</h1></div><div class='post'></div>")
# => {:post => {:title => "Hello"}}

text

Extracts value from current node. Rarely required.

harvester = Harvester.new do |h|
  h.child :post, :selector => "div.post" do |p|
    p.text :body
  end
end

harvester.parse("<div class='post'><b>Hello</b> world</div>")
# => {:post => {:body => "Hello world"}}

Dependencies

  • Ruby (currently 1.9)
  • Nokogiri
  • Addressable
  • Chronic18n if you want to use date parsing
    • Use my fork if you desire to use russian locale for dates

Feedback

Use github issues or contact me directly by mail (markizko+harvester@gmail.com)

License

Harvester is released into public domain (http://unlicense.org/UNLICENSE)

Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.