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An Example Implementation of a Passbook Webservice on Rails

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README.md

Passbook

Passbook on Rails Example

Passbook is an iOS 6 feature that manages boarding passes, movie tickets, retail coupons, & loyalty cards. Using the PassKit API, developers can register web services to automatically update content on the pass, such as gate changes on a boarding pass, or adding credit to a loyalty card.

Apple provides a specification for a REST-style web service protocol to communicate with Passbook, with endpoints to get the latest version of a pass, register / unregister devices to receive push notifications for a pass, and query for passes registered for a device.

This project is an example implementation of this web service specification in Rails.

If you're looking to generate .pkpass files, check out Dubai.

If you're just starting out Passbook development, you should definitely check out this great two-part tutorial by Marin Todorov (Part 1 Part 2).

Requirements

  • Ruby 1.9
  • PostgreSQL 9.1 running locally (Postgres.app is the easiest way to get a Postgres server running on your Mac)

Getting Started

$ git clone https://github.com/mattt/passbook_rails_example.git
$ cd passbook_rails_example
$ bundle
$ rake db:create db:migrate db:seed
$ rails s

Points of Interest

Rails generates a ton of boilerplate. For your convenience, here's a list of the files that actually demonstrate the Passbook functionality:

  • app/controllers/passbook/*.rb
  • app/models/passbook/*.rb
  • db/migrate/*.rb
  • db/seeds.rb

Use of Postgres hstore

This example application can accomodate multiple kinds of passes because of the hstore schemaless key-value data type in Postgres.

ActiveRecord in Rails 4 will natively support hstore serialization, but in the meantime, this functionality is provided by the activerecord-postgres-hstore gem.

Deployment

Heroku is the easiest way to get your app up and running. For full instructions on how to get started, check out "Getting Started with Rails 3.x on Heroku".

Once you've installed the Heroku Toolbelt, and have a Heroku account, enter the following commands from the project directory:

$ heroku create
$ git push heroku master
$ heroku run rake db:migrate

Take the URL from your newly-created Heroku app, and specify that as the webservice URL for your Passbook bundle. Passbook requires an HTTPS connection to your server for all communications.

To send push notifications about changes in a user's pass, check out houston.


Specification

What follows is a summary of the specification. The complete specification can be found in the Passbook Web Service Reference.

Getting the Latest Version of a Pass

GET http://example.com/v1/passes/:passTypeIdentifier/:serialNumber
  • passTypeIdentifier The pass’s type, as specified in the pass.
  • serialNumber The unique pass identifier, as specified in the pass.

Response

  • If request is authorized, return HTTP status 200 with a payload of the pass data.
  • If the request is not authorized, return HTTP status 401.
  • Otherwise, return the appropriate standard HTTP status.

Getting the Serial Numbers for Passes Associated with a Device

GET http://example.com/v1/devices/:deviceLibraryIdentifier/registrations/:passTypeIdentifier[?passesUpdatedSince=tag]
  • deviceLibraryIdentifier A unique identifier that is used to identify and authenticate the device.
  • passTypeIdentifier The pass’s type, as specified in the pass.
  • serialNumber The unique pass identifier, as specified in the pass.
  • passesUpdatedSince Optional A tag from a previous request.

Response

If the passesUpdatedSince parameter is present, return only the passes that have been updated since the time indicated by tag. Otherwise, return all passes.

  • If there are matching passes, return HTTP status 200 with a JSON dictionary with the following keys and values:
    • lastUpdated (string) The current modification tag.
    • serialNumbers (array of strings) The serial numbers of the matching passes.
  • If there are no matching passes, return HTTP status 204.
  • Otherwise, return the appropriate standard HTTP status.

Registering a Device to Receive Push Notifications for a Pass

POST http://example.com/v1/devices/:deviceLibraryIdentifier/registrations/:passTypeIdentifier/:serialNumber
  • deviceLibraryIdentifier A unique identifier that is used to identify and authenticate the device.
  • passTypeIdentifier The pass’s type, as specified in the pass.
  • serialNumber The unique pass identifier, as specified in the pass.

The POST payload is a JSON dictionary, containing a single key and value:

  • pushToken The push token that the server can use to send push notifications to this device.

Response

  • If the serial number is already registered for this device, return HTTP status 200.
  • If registration succeeds, return HTTP status 201.
  • If the request is not authorized, return HTTP status 401.
  • Otherwise, return the appropriate standard HTTP status.

Unregistering a Device

DELETE http://example.com/v1/devices/:deviceLibraryIdentifier/registrations/:passTypeIdentifier/:serialNumber
  • deviceLibraryIdentifier A unique identifier that is used to identify and authenticate the device.
  • passTypeIdentifier The pass’s type, as specified in the pass.
  • serialNumber The unique pass identifier, as specified in the pass.

Response

  • If disassociation succeeds, return HTTP status 200.
  • If the request is not authorized, return HTTP status 401.
  • Otherwise, return the appropriate standard HTTP status.

Contact

Mattt Thompson

License

passbook_rails_example is available under the MIT license. See the LICENSE file for more info.

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