It's high time a certain antiquated image format was nuked from orbit. This command helps you convert animations to faster-loading WebM files.
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gifnuke.js
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readme.md

It's high time a certain antiquated image format was nuked from orbit. This command helps you convert animations to faster-loading WebM files. Modern video formats not only produce much smaller files, which are easily loopable with an HTML <video> element, but they also load progressively without the "slow mo" effect.

Want to see it in action? http://mattvh.github.io/gifnuke/

1.7M dealwithit.gif
94K  dealwithit.webm
141K dealwithit.mp4

Installation

Note: Before installing GIFnuke, you must have ffmpeg installed and compiled with the --enable-libvpx option, in order to enable WebM encoding.

npm install gifnuke -g

Or:

git clone https://github.com/redwallhp/gifnuke.git
cd gifnuke
npm install
npm link

Converting an image

Run GIFnuke on an input GIF, and specify a name for the converted file. After the gears in your computer whir for awhile, you should get a shiny new .webm file in the directory you ran it in.

gifnuke badformat/myimage.gif myimage
gifnuke http://example.org/myimage.gif myimage

If you're converting a fancy GIF using that transparent partial-frame voodoo to reduce file size, you may need to run GIFnuke with the --coalesce flag. This requires that you have Imagemagick installed, as it takes advantage of the convert command to preprocess the GIF.

# Convert an image with frame coalescing
gifnuke badformat/myimage.gif myimage --coalesce

License

The contents of this repository are licensed under the GNU Public License.