Skip to content

HTTPS clone URL

Subversion checkout URL

You can clone with HTTPS or Subversion.

Download ZIP
tree: f0b27d1210
Fetching contributors…

Cannot retrieve contributors at this time

316 lines (245 sloc) 13.546 kb
HOW TO COMPILE & INSTALL ELVIS 2.2
Separate sets of instructions are provided below for UNIX, Windows-NT,
MS-DOS, and OS/2.
For Win32 and MS-DOS, I've constructed batch files which, when run, cause
the programs to be compiled. This is the preferred way to compile elvis
and its related programs. However, you can also use MSVC++'s interactive
development environment if you prefer. Separate instructions are given
for both compilation methods, for both operating systems.
All of these instructions assume that you have already unpacked the files
from the source code archive, "elvis-2.2*.tar.gz". That's a gzipped tar
archive. If you don't have the gzip and tar utilities, then the easiest
way for you to unpack them is to compile the "untar.c" program (available
via anonymous FTP from ftp://ftp.cs.pdx.edu/pub/elvis/untar.c). The files
will be placed in a subdirectory named "elvis-2.2*". The MS-DOS *.MAK files
assume that you've unpacked them while in C:\MSVC, so the files themselves
should end up in C:\MSVC\elvis-2.2*.
Under MS-DOS, the name of the archive will be mangled. It will probably
be "elvis-~1.gz", but it may be something else; the exact name depends on
how you downloaded it, and whether you already had an old version of that
archive in the same directory. The MS-DOS version of the "untar" program
needs to be passed the mangled name, whatever that turns out to be. The
Win32 version, on the other hand, can handle the full "elvis-2.2*.tar.gz"
file name.
================================================================================
UNIX
1) Run the "configure" shell script to create "Makefile" and "config.h"
files. I tried to make this "configure" script work about the same
as GNU ones. For a complete list of options, run "configure -?"
Here's a list of some of the more important ones, but YOU PROBABLY
DON'T NEED TO USE ANY OF THEM because the defaults are pretty smart.
--verbose
This causes "configure" to output an explanation for each
decision that it makes. If "configure" isn't configuring
elvis correctly for your system, then you should rerun it
with "--verbose" to see why.
--with-x[=no]
This forces elvis to include support for X-windows, or
(with "=no") forces it not to support X-windows. If you
omit this flag, configure will automatically detect
whether X is installed on your system, and use it if
available.
--without-x
This is a synonym for "--with-x=no".
--x-includes=directory
configure has a built-in list of likely places where
X-windows header files might be installed. This argument
adds another possible location to the list. The list is
used for the automatic inspection if "--with-x[=no]" was
omitted, and the actual directory where the files were
found are incorporated into the Makefile.
The X-windows header files are actually expected to
reside in a subdirectory named "X11" under the given
directory. For example, if your system has a file named
/usr/local/X11R6/include/X11/X.h then you would give the
argument "--x-includes=/usr/local/X11R6/include"
--x-libraries=directory
Similarly, this adds a directory to the list of
directories where X-windows libraries might reside. The
directory where they actually do reside is incorporated
into the Makefile.
--bindir=directory
This value is incorporated into the Makefile. The
command "make install" will copy the executables into
this directory. The default is /usr/bin.
--datadir=directory
This is incorporated into both the Makefile and the
config.h file. It is the directory where elvis' support
files will reside after a "make install". The default is
/usr/share/elvis.
--docdir=directory
This is incorporated into both the Makefile and the
config.h file. It is the directory where elvis' manual
will reside after a "make install". The default is
/usr/share/elvis/doc.
--prefix=directory
This value is incorporated into the Makefile. It supplies
leading part of the datadir, docdir, and bindir values.
Its default value is /usr, which is why those directories
all have values starting with "/usr".
--libs=string
This option allows you to specify which library to use
for the "termcap" user interface. It will usually be
either -ltermcap or -lcurses.
--ioctl=tty-style
There are three possibilities: termios, termio, and
sgtty. These use Posix, SysV, and BSD terminal control
calls, respectively. The Posix termios calls usually
work best. The default is chosen by inspecting the
header files in /usr/include.
2) Give the command "make". This should eventually produce programs
named "elvis", "ref", "elvtags", and "elvfmt". (elvtags and elvfmt
are elvis' own versions of the standard ctags and fmt programs. The
names of elvis' versions were changed so they wouldn't clash with the
standard ones.)
3) You should be able to run "elvis" in the source code directory now.
Try "e2 README.html" or "e2 config.h".
Note that we're running the e2 shell script instead of the elvis
executable. e2 simply runs elvis in such a way that it looks for
its support files in the "data" subdirectory, instead of the usual
directory. We do this because the support files haven't been
installed into their usual directory yet.
4) If all goes well, you can install elvis by becoming the superuser and
running the command "make install". (Later, if you decide to uninstall
it you can do so via the command "make uninstall".)
--------------------------------------------------------------------
| NOTE: If you want to compile elvis with multiple configurations, |
| you should compile it with each configuration separately, and then |
| rename the executables, and "make clean" before running the |
| configure script for the next configuration. For example, to make |
| elvis both with and without X-windows, you could... |
| |
| configure --with-x linux |
| make |
| mv elvis xelvis |
| make clean |
| configure --with-x=no linux |
| make |
--------------------------------------------------------------------
================================================================================
MS-Windows/NT (or Windows95?), with Visual C++ 2.0 or later (Method #1):
1) Run the "makwin32.bat" file.
makwin32
2) You can install elvis.exe by copying it into some directory in your
execution path, and the "lib" files into a subdirectory named "lib"
under the directory where you installed elvis.exe. The following
commands are APPROXIMATELY what you need to do:
mkdir \localbin
copy *.exe \localbin
path %path%;\localbin
mkdir \localbin\lib
copy lib\*.* \localbin\lib
MS-Windows/NT (or Windows95?), with Visual C++ 2.0 or later (Method #2):
1) Copy all of the "*.mak" files from files from the oswin32 subdirectory.
copy oswin32\*.mak
2) Copy the file "osconfig.h" from the oswin32 directory to "config.h"
(without the initial "os") in the current directory.
copy oswin32\osconfig.h config.h
3) Start Visual C++ 2.0, and open the "elvis.mak" file. Select the
"Release" target.
4) Select the "Project->Build elvis.exe" menu item, and wait a while.
Eventually this should give you an "elvis.exe" program in the
WinRel subdirectory. You can test this program from inside
VC++ via the <F5> key.
5) Repeat steps 3 and 4 for the "ctags.mak", "ref.mak", and "fmt.mak"
files.
6) You can install elvis.exe by copying it into some directory in your
execution path, and the "lib" files into a subdirectory named "lib"
under the execution directory. The following commands are
APPROXIMATELY what you need to do:
mkdir \localbin
copy WinRel\*.exe \localbin
copy *.exe \localbin
path %path%;\localbin
mkdir \localbin\lib
copy lib\*.* \localbin\lib
================================================================================
MS-DOS, using Visual C++ 1.5 (Method #1):
REMINDER: MSVC++ 1.5 always puts the complete pathnames of all files
into its NMAKE files. Because of this, you *MUST* install the
source code into a directory named "C:\MSVC\elvis-2.2*". The
"elvis-2.*" component of that directory name is stored in the
"elvis-2.2*.tar.gz" archive file, so you should be in the C:\MSVC
directory when you extract the files. After extracting the files,
do a "cd elvis-2.2*"
1) Run the "makmsdos.bat" file
makmsdos
2) You can install elvis by copying the *.EXE files into some directory
in your execution path, and copying the "lib" files into a subdirectory
named "lib" under the directory where you installed the *.EXE files.
The following commands are APPROXIMATELY what you need to do:
mkdir \localbin
copy *.exe \localbin
mkdir \localbin\lib
copy \lib\*.* \localbin\lib
path {OLD PATH HERE};\localbin
MS-DOS, using Visual C++ 1.5 (Method #2):
REMINDER: MSVC++ 1.5 always puts the complete pathnames of all files
into its NMAKE files. Because of this, you *MUST* install the
source code into a directory named "C:\MSVC\elvis-2.2*". The
"elvis-2.2*" component of that directory name is stored in the
"elvis-2.2*.tar.gz" archive file, so you should be in the C:\MSVC
directory when you extract the files.
1) Copy all of the "C:\MSVC\elvis-2.2*\OSMSDOS\*.MAK" files into the
"C:\MSVC\elvis-2.2*" directory.
c:
cd \msvc\elvis-2.2*
copy osmsdos\*.mak
2) Copy the "\MSVC\elvis-2.2*\OSMSDOS\OSCONFIG.H" file to
"\MSVC\elvis-2.1\CONFIG.H" Note that the "OS" is dropped from the
filename.
copy osmsdos\osconfig.h config.h
3) Start Visual C++ 1.5, and open the "ELVIS.MAK" project.
4) Select the "Project->Build ELVIS.EXE" menu item, and wait a while.
Eventually this should give you an "ELVIS.EXE" program in the
current directory. You can test this program from inside VC++
via the <F5> key.
5) Repeat steps 3 and 4 for "CTAGS.MAK", "REF.MAK", and "FMT.MAK".
6) You can install elvis by copying the *.EXE files into some directory
in your execution path, and copying the "lib" files into a subdirectory
named "lib" under the directory where you installed the *.EXE files.
The following commands are APPROXIMATELY what you need to do:
mkdir \localbin
copy *.exe \localbin
mkdir \localbin\lib
copy lib\*.* \localbin\lib
path {OLD PATH HERE};\localbin
================================================================================
OS/2, using IBM VisualAge C++ 3.0, IBM CSet++ 2.01 or emx/gcc and GNU
"make". To use IBM's nmake instead of GNU make, edit the "makos2.cmd"
file and replace "make" with "nmake".
To use a different compiler... good luck. Basically you need to change
the setting of the "CC" macro in the Makefile, but there also come
compiler flags which you may need to change, and that's going to be a
challenge.
1) Run "makos2.cmd" with no arguments to compile elvis with TCP/IP
support. If your system doesn't have TCP/IP software installed,
then you can skip this step.
makos2
2) Run "makos2.cmd" with "--no-tcp" as an argument to compile elvis
without TCP/IP support. The resulting binary will be named
"elvis-no-tcp.exe". If you do have TCP/IP installed on your
computer, and never expect to use elvis on a non-TCP/IP system,
then you can skip this step.
makeos2 --no-tcp
3) To compile Elvis using emx/gcc linked against emx.dll providing
additional Termcap support use the "--with-emx" switch. The
resulting binaries will all end "emx.exe", like "refemx.exe":
makeos2 --with-emx
4) To compile Elvis using emx/gcc not needing emx.dll and not
providing TCP/IP support use the "--with-gcc" switch. The
resulting binaries will all end "gcc.exe", like "refgcc.exe":
makeos2 --with-gcc
5) You can install elvis by copying the *.exe files into some directory
in your execution path, and copying the "lib" files into a subdirectory
named "lib" under the directory where you installed the *.exe files.
The following commands are APPROXIMATELY what you need to do:
mkdir \localbin
copy *.exe \localbin
mkdir \localbin\lib
copy lib\*.* \localbin\lib
path {OLD PATH HERE};\localbin
After installing the files you should set the ELVISPATH environment
variable in your CONFIG.SYS file to the directory containing all the
stuff from the lib\ directory. This could look like:
set ELVISPATH=c:\localbin\lib
Jump to Line
Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.