Initiate rollback on any exception in a grails service marked as transactional.
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README.md

Summary

Initiate rollback on any throwable when inside a transactional context.

Terminology

Grails service (or simply service) is a Groovy class located in grails-app/services directory. Transactional service is any service not marked as static transactional = false or any service with @Transactional annotation at class or method level. Remember that grails services are transactional by default.

Rationale

When service class is marked as transactional, grails uses spring to setup proxy around a service. Long story short, here is a quote for DefaultTransactionAttribute from spring API documentation:

Transaction attribute that takes the EJB approach to
rolling back on runtime, but not checked, exceptions.

Things worth mentioning regarding spring's approach:

  1. API documentation doesn't mention it but errors (java.lang.Error) also rollback transaction.
  2. This behavior is only used for interceptors. They are needed to create proxy around transactional service. At least one other class rolls back on any exception - be that checked, unchecked exception or an error. One such example is TransactionTemplate class.

It might make sense not to rollback on checked exceptions in Java but it doesn't in Groovy. Groovy doesn't force you to catch checked exceptions. Herein lies a problem. If any code throws checked exception (which includes java.sql.SQLException), transaction does not rollback. One commonly used class that can throw checked exception is groovy.sql.Sql.

See further discussion on the matter at grails-user mail list post titled Rolling back transactions on checked exceptions.

Example

Suppose a grails service:

import javax.sql.DataSource
import groovy.sql.Sql

class FooService {

    static transactional = true

    DataSource dataSource

    def bar() {
        model1.save()
        model2.save()

        def sql = new Sql(dataSource)
        sql.call 'execute procedure that_runs_as_part_of_transactional_block'
    }

}

The code works for as long as sql.call never throws java.sql.SQLException. Valid reasons for throwing exception are: row or page lock, duplicate record, procedure raising exception, connection problems, replication or as simple as someone-renamed-my-procedure error. No matter what the reason is, java.sql.SQLException is checked exception. No transaction rollback occurs under such circumstance.

One solution could be to use @Transactional spring annotation:

import javax.sql.DataSource
import groovy.sql.Sql

import org.springframework.transaction.annotation.Transactional

class FooService {

    // using @Transactional annotation instead
    static transactional = false

    DataSource dataSource

    @Transactional(rollbackFor = Throwable)
    def bar() {
        model1.save()
        model2.save()

        def sql = new Sql(dataSource)
        sql.call 'execute procedure that_runs_as_part_of_transactional_block'
    }

}

This solution has a big problem though. It's easy to forget to use suggested approach; leading to bugs that very hard to track down. You might notice it in production - when it's far too late (I did).

rollback-on-exception plugin attacks problem head-on by configuring spring to rollback on any exception or error (any java.lang.Throwable). Here are two examples that work as expected once the plugin is installed.

Example #1: sql.executeInsert can fail because of locks or duplicate record

import javax.sql.DataSource
import groovy.sql.Sql

class FooService {

    static transactional = true

    DataSource dataSource

    def bar() {
        model.save()

        def sql = new Sql(dataSource)
        sql.executeInsert 'insert into foo values (?, ?)', [1, 'bar']
    }

}

Example #2: Throwing checked exceptions

import javax.sql.DataSource
import groovy.sql.Sql

class FooService {

    static transactional = true

    DataSource dataSource

    def bar() {
        def from = // source account id
        def into = // destination account id

        def sql = new Sql(dataSource)
        sql.executeInsert 'update account set balance = balance + 100 where id = ?', [into]
        sql.executeInsert 'update account set balance = balance - 100 where id = ?', [from]

        def balance = sql.firstRow('select balance from account where id = ?', [from])
        if (balance < 0) {
            throw new InsufficientFundsException(from, balance)
        }
    }

}

class InsufficientFundsException extends Exception {

    InsufficientFundsException(from, balance) {
        super("$from account can't have negative balance but would have $balance")
    }

}

Install

  • for grails 1.x use version 0.1
  • for grails 2.5+ use version 0.2
  • there is currently no support for grails 3.x

Add to grails-app/conf/BuildConfig.groovy:

plugins {
    runtime ':rollback-on-exception:0.2'
}

No additional configuration is required.

Uninstall

Remove rollback-on-exception line in grails-app/conf/BuildConfig.groovy.

Configuration

Currently, plugin doesn't support any configuration.

Impact on Current Code

Plugin shouldn't drastically impact existing code. Only spring beans of type org.codehaus.groovy.grails.commons.spring.TypeSpecifyableTransactionProxyFactoryBean are altered. This generally only includes transactional services. Services are configured to rollback on any throwable instead of committing transaction. Service configuration happens at boot time - when web application is starting.

Additionally GrailsTransactionAttribute is overriden to make sure Domain.withTransaction behaves as expected.

NOTE: Be aware that any use of dataSourceUnproxied, with or without this plugin, requires programmatic transactional management. Declaring static transactional = true doesn't work with dataSourceUnproxied. Acquired connection is being used outside of HibernateTransactionManager. Therefore, use sql.withTransaction where necessary.

Compatibility with @Transactional

Code that uses @Transactional annotations remains unchanged. Meaning of rollbackFor attribute is respected even after installing rollback-on-exception. For example, following code still rolls back only for RuntimeException, Error and MyException.

import javax.sql.DataSource
import groovy.sql.Sql

import org.springframework.transaction.annotation.Transactional

class FooService {

    // using @Transactional annotation instead
    static transactional = false

    DataSource dataSource

    @Transactional(rollbackFor = [RuntimeException, Error, MyException])
    def bar() {
        model1.save()
        model2.save()

        def sql = new Sql(dataSource)
        sql.call 'execute procedure that_runs_as_part_of_transactional_block'
    }

}

Further Resources