Get things done with the MarkLogic Task Server
XQuery
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
src
test
xray @ 1860e85
.gitmodules
CONTRIBUTING.md
README.md

README.md

taskbot

Introduction

Need to boil an ocean? The taskbot library can help you put the MarkLogic Task Server to work. Simple map-reduce functions helps you farm out as many tasks as your MarkLogic cluster can handle, with as much concurrency as you need.

Get the job done.

Taskbot is basically a map-reduce utility. Start with an anonymous function, and a list of stuff: document URIs, or anything else. Taskbot spawns a task for each segment of the list, using a size you specify. You provide an anonymous function that processes each segment. The Task Manager queue and thread pool manage the work, providing as much data-driven parallelism as the configuration and the workload allow.

If the anonymous function updates the database, your work is done. If your function returns results, supply $tb:OPTIONS-SYNC and reduce the results however you like.

Requirements

Taskbot relies heavily on xdmp:spawn-function, xdmp:invoke-function, and anonymous functions. These were introduced in MarkLogic 7. In theory you could do similar things with earlier releases: patches welcome!

Interface

To get started with taskbot, you need a list of items to process and the code to process each item. This might be a list of URIs and a document enrichment module. Or a list of URLs and some code to fetch and insert each URL into a database. This is similar to CoRB, but without any need for Java and less specific to updates.

All that might sound a little too abstract, so here are some examples.

Creating 1M documents

Inserting one million documents in a single transaction can be painful, but it's easy with tasks of 500 documents each.

This example is loosely based on the 2insert.xqm test case. We ask taskbot to insert 1,000,000 documents in segments of 500 each. This can be much faster than a single transaction.

(: This inserts 1M simple test documents.
 : Extend as needed.
 :)
tb:list-segment-process(
  (: Total size of the job. :)
  1 to 1000 * 1000,
  (: Size of each segment of work. :)
  500,
  "test/asset",
  (: This anonymous function will be called for each segment. :)
  function($list as item()+, $opts as map:map?) {
    (: Any chainsaw should have a safety. Check it here. :)
    tb:maybe-fatal(),
    for $i in $list
    return xdmp:document-insert(
      "test/asset/"||$i,
      element asset {
        attribute id { 'asset'||$i },
        element asset-org { 1 + xdmp:random(99) },
        element asset-person { 1 + xdmp:random(999) },
        (1 to xdmp:random(9))
        ! element asset-ref { xdmp:random(1000) } }),
    (: This is an update, so be sure to commit each segment. :)
    xdmp:commit() },
  (: options - not used in this example. :)
  map:new(map:entry('testing', '123...')),
  (: This is an update, so be sure to say so. :)
  $tb:OPTIONS-UPDATE)

Important points:

  • The segment size is 500, which is a good place to start.
  • Do not change the function signature.
    • The first parameter is the list of (at most) 500 items to process. In this example, each item will be a number from 1 to 1M.
    • The second parameter is a map, which can contain anything you like. In this example it's just a placeholder with testing: 123....
  • If your function includes updates, remember to call xdmp:commit at the end.

Calculate and persist document relationships

This example is loosely based on the 3ref.xqm test case. The idea is to calculate and store the relationship between a give asset document and other asset documents that refer to it. By persisting this relationship we could use it to build a range index, and make it available for queries.

(: In a cluster, start this once on each host.
 : This will create a new task per forest,
 : fanning out from there.
 :)
for $f in tb:database-host-forests(xdmp:database(), xdmp:host())
return xdmp:spawn-function(
  tb:forests-uris-process(
    $f,
   ('document'),
   cts:directory-query('test/asset/', 'infinity'),
   500,
   'test/asset',
   function($list as item()+, $opts as map:map?) {
     tb:maybe-fatal(),
     for $uri in $list
     let $id := substring-after($uri, 'test/asset/')
     let $root := doc($uri)/asset
     let $old := $root/asset-ref-count
     (: This could also use cts:values and cts:frequency,
      : with appropriate range indexes.
      : Or consider a co-occurence map over the whole input list.
      :)
     let $new := element asset-ref-count {
       xdmp:estimate(
         cts:search(
           doc(),
           cts:and-query(
             (cts:directory-query('test/asset/', 'infinity'),
               cts:element-value-query(xs:QName('asset-ref'), $id))))) }
     where empty($old) or $new ne $old
     return (
       if ($old) then xdmp:node-replace($old, $new)
       else xdmp:node-insert-child($root, $new)),
     xdmp:commit() },
   (),
   $tb:OPTIONS-UPDATE))

Report on existing documents

Sometimes you need to report on what's out there, but the existing indexes don't support your query and you don't have time to build new indexes. Ask taskbot to help. The key here is $tb:OPTIONS-SYNC, which includes the <result>true</result> option. So your work runs on the task server, but you still get the results back in your query.

This example is loosely based on the 4results.xqm test case. The idea is to calculate the average number of asset-ref elements per asset document. We map this work across all forests, in segments of 500 documents each, then reduce the results.

(: In a cluster, start this once on each host.
 : This will create a new task per forest,
 : fanning out from there.
 :)
let $results := tb:forests-uris-process(
  tb:database-host-forests(xdmp:database(), xdmp:host()),
  ("document"),
  cts:directory-query("test/asset/", "infinity"),
  500,
  "test/asset",
  function($list as item()+, $opts as map:map?) {
    tb:maybe-fatal(),
    json:to-array(
      (count($list),
        (: Each item is a URI. :)
        count(doc($list)/asset/asset-ref))) },
  (),
  $tb:OPTIONS-SYNC)
let $item-count := sum($results ! json:array-values(.)[1])
let $ref-count := sum($results ! json:array-values(.)[2])
return ($ref-count div $item-count)))

API

Module Variables

For your convenience, taskbot exposes some module variables.

Options elements in the xdmp:eval namespace

  • OPTIONS-PRIORITY: set higher
  • OPTIONS-SAFE: set <isolation>different-transaction</isolation> and <prevent-deadlocks>true</prevent-deadlocks>. This is useful to avoid accidentally starting an update from an update.
  • OPTIONS-SYNC: set <result>true</result> and <priority>higher</priority>. This is useful when your task will return results.
  • OPTIONS-SYNC-UPDATE: set <result>true</result> and <priority>higher</priority> and <transaction-mode>update</transaction-mode>. This is useful when your task will update and return results.
  • OPTIONS-UPDATE: set <transaction-mode>update</transaction-mode>. Use this for any update function, because xdmp:spawn-function defaults to timestamped mode. Also be sure to call xdmp:commit at the end of your function.

Functions

list-segment-process

tb:list-segment-process(
  $list-all as item()*,
  $size as xs:integer,
  $label as xs:string,
  $fn as function(item()+, map:map?) as item()*,
  [$fn-options as map:map?],
  [$eval-options as element(eval:options)?],
  [$mode as xs:string],
  [$policy as xs:string?],
  [$sleep as xs:unsignedInt?])
as item()*

Apply a function $fn across a list of items $list, in segments of $size each. The $label is an arbitrary string used for logging.

The function $fn must have the correct signature function(item()+, map:map?) as item()*. This will be called multiple times, each time processing a segment of $size sequential items from $list. Any map is supplied as $fn-options, it will be passed to $fn for each segment.

The $mode may be spawn (default) or invoke, and governs whether each segment is processed using xdmp:spawn-function or xdmp:invoke-function. If $eval-options are supplied, they will be passed to the xdmp:spawn-function or xdmp:invoke-function call for each segment.

If $mode is spawn (default), and the call to xdmp:spawn-function throws XDMP-MAXTASKS, then the $policy will govern behavior. Policies include:

  • abort: re-throw the XDMP-MAXTASKS error, aborting the work.
  • caller-blocks: the caller will sleep and try again, using incremental back off and retry. The first sleep is 1-ms, doubling to a maximum of 1000-ms.
  • caller-runs (default): the caller will invoke the function immediately.
  • discard: the segment will be discarded.

If $sleep is supplied, taskbot will sleep $sleep milliseconds between segments. This can be useful when the work is low-priority and might impact production queries unless throttled.

forests-uris-process

tb:forests-uris-process(
  $forests as xs:unsignedLong+,
  $uris-options as xs:string*,
  $query as cts:query?,
  $size as xs:integer,
  $label as xs:string,
  $fn as function(item()+, map:map?) as item()*,
  [$fn-options as map:map?],
  [$eval-options as element(eval:options)?])
as item()*

This function uses cts:uris to list URIs from specific forest(s), optionally matching $query and $uris-options. See cts:uris for details of these options. The URIs and remaining options are passed to tb:list-segment-process for segmentation and processing.

fatal-set

tb:fatal-set($value as xs:boolean)
as empty-sequence()

This function sets the server variable checked by tb:maybe-fatal. Set true to stop existing work as quickly as possible, without restarting MarkLogic.

maybe-fatal

tb:maybe-fatal()
as empty-sequence()

This function checks a server field to see if the current operation has been canceled. If so it will throw TASKBOT-FATAL.

log

tb:log(
  $label as xs:string,
  $list as xs:anyAtomicType*,
  $level as xs:string)
as empty-sequence()

Use this function to log messages at an arbitrary level. The $label will automatically gain a taskbot: prefix. The levels are the ones used by xdmp:log.

fine

tb:fine(
  $label as xs:string,
  $list as xs:anyAtomicType*)
as empty-sequence()

Log a message at level=fine. The $label will automatically gain a taskbot: prefix.

debug

tb:debug(
  $label as xs:string,
  $list as xs:anyAtomicType*)
as empty-sequence()

Log a message at level=debug. The $label will automatically gain a taskbot: prefix.

info

tb:info(
  $label as xs:string,
  $list as xs:anyAtomicType*)
as empty-sequence()

Log a message at level=info. The $label will automatically gain a taskbot: prefix.

warning

tb:warning(
  $label as xs:string,
  $list as xs:anyAtomicType*)
as empty-sequence()

Log a message at level=warning. The $label will automatically gain a taskbot: prefix.

error

tb:error(
  $code as xs:string,
  $items as item()*)
as empty-sequence()

Throw an error using fn:error. The $code will automatically gain a TASKBOT- prefix.

assert-timestamp

tb:assert-timestamp()
as empty-sequence()

Call to ensure that the current evaluation context is read-only, aka timestamped. If called in an update, it will throw an error TASKBOT-NOTIMESTAMP.

options-forest

tb:options-forest($forest as xs:unsignedLong)
as element(eval:options)

Returns an eval options element that can be used to restrict an operation to a single forest.

options-forest-update

tb:options-forest-update($forest as xs:unsignedLong)
as element(eval:options)

Returns an eval options element that can be used to restrict an update operation to a single forest.

Troubleshooting

Look for messages in ErrorLog.txt, especially after setting file-log-level to debug or fine. Write your own messages using xdmp:log or the taskbot log functions.

If you have a bunch of out of control tasks queued, and don't want to restart the server, call tb:fatal-set(true()). Remember to call tb:fatal-set(false()) before you try again. You can protect your own code by calling tb:maybe-fatal(), as in the examples above.

Disappearing updates? Did you remember to call xdmp:commit() in your anonymous function?

Not seeing enough parallelism? Is the input list large enough to drive enough tasks? Do you have enough Task Manager threads configured for your CPU core count? Experiment with 1-4 threads per CPU core.

License Information

Copyright (c) 2014 Michael Blakeley. All Rights Reserved.

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance with the License. You may obtain a copy of the License at

http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied. See the License for the specific language governing permissions and limitations under the License.

The use of the Apache License does not indicate that this project is affiliated with the Apache Software Foundation.