Logical Symbols

Matt Dickenson edited this page Jan 24, 2015 · 1 revision

& ("ampersand"); ASCII: 38, Unicode: U+0026, HTML: &

  1. Logical conjunction ("and"): combines two logical subclauses so that the resulting clause is true if both subclauses are true and false otherwise. For example, true & true = true, true & false = false, false & false = false. Another commonly used symbol for representing logical conjunction is ^. [ref]

^ ("carat", aka "up arrowhead"); ASCII: 94, Unicode: U+005E, HTML: ^

  1. Logical conjunction ("and"): combines two logical subclauses so that the resulting clause is true if both subclauses are true and false otherwise. For example, true ^ true = true, true ^ false = false, false ^ false = false. Another commonly used symbol for representing logical conjunction is &. [ref]

¬ ("negation symbol"); ASCII: 170, Unicode: U+00AC, HTML: ª

  1. Logical negation ("not"): in logical notation ¬x is typically read as "not x", meaning the opposite of x. For example, if x is a true proposition, then ¬x is false. Less commonly in CS papers, negation can be indicated by the symbol ! [ref].

˅ ("down arrowhead", aka "upside-down carat); ASCII: 709, Unicode: U+02C5, HTML: ˅

  1. Logical disjunction ("or"): combines two logical subclauses so that the resulting clause is true if either of the subclauses are true and false otherwise. For example, true ˅ true = true, true ˅ false = true, false ˅ false = false. Another commonly used symbol for representing logical conjunction is +. [ref]
You can’t perform that action at this time.
You signed in with another tab or window. Reload to refresh your session. You signed out in another tab or window. Reload to refresh your session.
Press h to open a hovercard with more details.