Phiremock mocks HTTP requests and REST services, allowing to mock external services during acceptance testing.
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README.md

Phiremock

Phiremock is a mocker and stubber of HTTP services, it allows software developers to mock HTTP requests and setup responses to avoid calling real services during development, and is particulary useful during acceptance testing when expected http requests can be mocked and verified. Any HTTP service (i.e.: REST services) can be mocked and stubbed with Phiremock. Phiremock is heavily inspired by WireMock, but does not force you to have a java installation in your PHP development environment. The full functionality of Phiremock is detailed in the following list:

  • Allows to mock http request based in method, headers, url and body content.
  • Allows to match expectations using regexp patterns or equality.
  • REST interface to setup.
  • Stateful and stateless mocking.
  • Network latency simulation.
  • Priorizable expectations for cases in which more than one matches the request. If more than one expectation matches the request and no priorities were set, the first match is returned.
  • Allows to verify the amount of times a request was done.
  • Allows to load default expectations from json files in a directory tree.
  • Proxy requests to another URL as they are received.
  • Client with fluent interface to configure Phiremock.
  • Integration to codeception through phiremock-codeception-extension.
  • Fill the response body using data from the request.

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Installation

Composer:

This project is published in packagist, so you just need to add it as a dependency in your composer.json:

    "require-dev": {
        "mcustiel/phiremock": "*"
    }

Phar:

You can also download the standalone phar application from here to run on PHP7. There is also a PHP5 version.

Configuration

Phiremock uses annotations internally. To be able to run the Phiremock client library, the annotations autoloader must be activated. To do this, you must add the next lines in the bootstrap file where you include your composer autoloader:

$loader = require APP_ROOT . '/vendor/autoload.php';
\Doctrine\Common\Annotations\AnnotationRegistry::registerLoader([$loader, 'loadClass']);

How does it work?

Phiremock will allow you to create a stubbed version of some external service your application needs to communicate to. That can be used to avoid calling the real application during development or to setup responses to expected requests

First of all you need to setup the config for the different environments for your application. For instance:

    // config/production.json
    {
        "external_service": "https://service.example.com/v1/"
    }
    // config/acceptance.json
    {
        "external_service": "https://phiremock.server:8080/example_service/"
    }

Run your phiremock service using it's cli command:

    ./vendor/bin/phiremock -p 8088 -i 0.0.0.0

or

    ./phiremock.phar -p 8088 -i 0.0.0.0

Cli arguments:

  • -i argument: specifies in which interface Phiremock should listen for requests. Default is 0.0.0.0
  • -p argument: is the port in which Phiremock should listen. Default is 8086
  • -d argument: enables debug mode in logger. By default, info logging level is used.
  • -e argument: specifies a directory tree to search for json files defining expectations to load by default. Default is ~/.phiremock/expectations

Then, using phiremock's REST interface, expectations can be configured, specifying the response to send for a given request. A REST expectation resource for phiremock looks like this:

{
    "scenarioName": "potato",
    "scenarioStateIs": "Scenario.START",
    "newScenarioState": "tomato",
    "request": {
        "method": "GET",
        "url": {
            "isEqualTo" : "/example_service/some/resource"
        },
        "body" : {
            "matches" : "/some regex pattern/i"
        },
        "headers" : {
            "X-MY-HEADER": "Some value"
        }
    },
    "response": {
        "statusCode": 200,
        "body": {"id": 1, "description": "I am a resource"},
        "headers": {
            "Content-Type": "application/json"
        },
        "delayMillis": 3000
    },
    "proxyTo": null,
    "priority" : 0
}

The same format can be used in expectation files saved in the directory tree specified by the -e argument of the CLI. For Phiremock to be able to load them, each file should have .json extension.

Phiremock Client

Phiremock also provides a handy client object to simplify communication with the server in a fluent way.

Features

Create an expectation

To create previous response from code the following should be used:

Phiremock client

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    $expectation = Phiremock::on(
        A::getRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/example_service/some/resource'))
    )->then(
        Respond::withStatusCode(200)
            ->andBody('{"id": 1, "description": "I am a resource"}')
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', 'application/json')
    );
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

API call:

POST /__phiremock/expectations HTTP/1.1
Host: your.phiremock.host
Content-Type: application/json

{
    "request": {
        "method": "GET",
        "url": {
            "isEqualTo" : "/example_service/some/resource"
        }
    },
    "response": {
        "statusCode": 200,
        "body": "{\"id\": 1, \"description\": \"I am a resource\"}",
        "headers": {
            "Content-Type": "application/json"
        }
    }
}

Clear expectations

After a test runs, all previously configured expectations can be deleted so they don't affect the execution of the next test:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    $phiremock->clearExpectations();

API call:

DELETE /__phiremock/expectations HTTP/1.1
Host: your.phiremock.host

List all expectations

If you want, for some reason, list all created expectations. A convenient method is provided:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    $expectations = $phiremock->listExpectations();
    
    foreach ($expectations as $expectation) {
        var_export($expectation);
    }

API call:

GET /__phiremock/expectations HTTP/1.1
Host: your.phiremock.host

Verify amount of requests

To know how much times a request was sent to Phiremock, for instance to verify after a feature execution in a test, there is a helper method too:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    $actualExecutions = $phiremock->countExecutions(
        A::getRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/example_service/some/resource'))
    );
    $this->assertEquals($expectedExecutions, $actualExecutions);

API call:

POST /__phiremock/executions HTTP/1.1
Host: your.phiremock.host
Content-Type: application/json

{
    "request": {
        "method": "GET",
        "url": {
            "isEqualTo" : "/example_service/some/resource"
        }
    },
    "response": {}
}

Search executed requests

To search for the list of requests to which phiremock responded:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    $actualExecutions = $phiremock->listExecutions(
        A::getRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/example_service/some/resource'))
    );
    $this->assertEquals($expectedExecutionsList, $actualExecutionsList);

API call:

PUT /__phiremock/executions HTTP/1.1
Host: your.phiremock.host
Content-Type: application/json

{
    "request": {
        "method": "GET",
        "url": {
            "isEqualTo" : "/example_service/some/resource"
        }
    },
    "response": {}
}

Reset requests log

To reset the requests counter to 0, Phiremock also provides a method:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    $phiremock->resetRequestsCounter();

API call:

DELETE /__phiremock/executions HTTP/1.1
Host: your.phiremock.host

Reset Phiremock to its initial state

To reset the requests counter to 0, Phiremock also provides a method:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    $phiremock->reset();

API call:

POST /__phiremock/reset HTTP/1.1
Host: your.phiremock.host

Send binary body in response

Binary contents can be sent as a response body too.

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    $expectation = Phiremock::on(
        A::getRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/example_service/photo.jpg'))
    )->then(
        Respond::withStatusCode(200)
            ->andBinaryBody(THE_IMAGE_CONTENTS)
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', 'image/jpeg')
    );
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

API call:

POST /__phiremock/expectations HTTP/1.1
Host: your.phiremock.host
Content-Type: application/json

{
    "request": {
        "method": "GET",
        "url": {
            "isEqualTo" : "/example_service/photo.jpg"
        }
    },
    "response": {
        "statusCode": 200,
        "body": "phiremock.base64:HERE_THE_BASE64_ENCODED_IMAGE",
        "headers": {
            "Content-Type": "image/jpeg"
        }
    }
}

Cool stuff

Priorities

Phiremock accepts multiple expectations that can match the same request. If no priorities are set, it will match the first expectation created but, if you need to give high priority to some request, you can do it easily.

   use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

   $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
   
   $expectation = Phiremock::on(
       A::getRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/example_service/some/resource'))
   )->then(
       Respond::withStatusCode(200)
           ->andBody('<resource id="1" description="I am a resource"/>')
           ->andHeader('Content-Type', 'text/xml')
   );
   $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);
   
   $expectation = Phiremock::on(
       A::getRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/example_service/some/resource'))
           ->andHeader('Accept', Is::equalTo('application/json'))
           ->andPriority(1)
   )->then(
       Respond::withStatusCode(200)
           ->andBody('{"id": 1, "description": "I am a resource"}')
           ->andHeader('Content-Type', 'application/json')
   );
   $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

In the previous example, both expectations will match a request with url equal to: /example_service/some/resource and Accept header equal to application/json. But Phiremock will give higher priority to the one with Accept header. Default priority for an expectation is 0.

Stateful behaviour

If you want to simulate a behaviour of the service in which a response depends of a state that was set in a previous request. You can use scenarios to create a stateful behaviour.

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    
    $expectation = Phiremock::on(
        A::postRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/example_service/some/resource'))
            ->andBody(Is::equalTo('{"id": "1", "name" : "resource"}'))
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', Is::equalTo('application/json'))
            ->andScenarioState('saved', 'Scenario.START')
    )->then(
        Respond::withStatusCode(201)
            ->andBody('{"id": "1", "name" : "resource"}')
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', 'application/json')
            ->andSetScenarioStateTo('RESOURCE_SAVED')
    );
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);
    
    $expectation = Phiremock::on(
        A::postRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/example_service/some/resource'))
            ->andBody(Is::equalTo('{"id": "1", "name" : "resource"}'))
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', Is::equalTo('application/json'))
            ->andScenarioState('saved', 'RESOURCE_SAVED')
    )->then(
        Respond::withStatusCode(409)
            ->andBody('Resource with id = 1 was already created')
    );
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

In this case, Phiremock will execute the first expectation for the first call, and the second one for the second call even when both requests matchers are exactly the same. If you want after the second call, to go back to the initial state just add ->andSetScenarioStateTo('Scenario.START') to the response.

To reset all scenarios to the initial state (Scenario.START) use this simple method from the client:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    
    $phiremock->resetScenarios();

API call:

DELETE /__phiremock/scenarios HTTP/1.1
Host: your.phiremock.host

To define a scenario state in any moment:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;
    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Domain\ScenarioState;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    
    $phiremock->setScenarioState(new ScenarioState('saved', 'Scenario.START')));

API call:

PUT /__phiremock/scenarios HTTP/1.1
Host: your.phiremock.host

{
    "scenarioName": "saved",
    "scenarioState": "Scenario.START"
}

Netwok latency simulation

If you want to test how your application behaves on, for instance, a timeout; you can make Phiremock to delay the response of your request as follows.

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    
    $expectation = Phiremock::on(
        A::postRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/example_service/some/resource'))
            ->andBody(Is::equalTo('{"id": "1", "name" : "resource"}'))
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', Is::equalTo('application/json'))
    )->then(
        Respond::withStatusCode(200)->andDelayInMillis(30000)
    );
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

This will wait 30 seconds before sending the response.

Proxy

It could be the case a mock is not needed for certain call. For this specific case, Phiremock provides a proxy feature that will pass the received request unmodified to a configured URI. It can be used as folows:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    
    $expectation = Phiremock::on(
        A::posttRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/example_service/proxy/me'))
            ->andBody(Is::equalTo('{"id": "1", "name" : "resource"}'))
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', Is::equalTo('application/json'))
    )->proxyTo(
        'http://your.real.service/some/path/script.php'
    );
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

In this case, Phiremock will POST http://your.real.service/some/path/script.php with the configured body and header and return it's response.

Compare JSON objects

Phiremock supports comparing strict equality of json objects, in case it's used in the API. The comparison is object-wise, so it does not matter that indentation or spacing is different.

Example:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    
    $expectation = Phiremock::on(
        A::posttRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/my/resource'))
            ->andBody(Is::sameJsonObjectAs('{"some": "json", "here":[1, 2, 3]}'))
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', Is::equalTo('application/json'))
    )->then(
        Respond::withStatusCode(201)->andBody('{"id": 1}')
    );
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

Also passing of arrays or \JsonSerializable objects is supported.

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    
    $expectation = Phiremock::on(
        A::posttRequest()->andUrl(Is::equalTo('/my/resource'))
            ->andBody(Is::sameJsonObjectAs(['some' => 'json', 'here' => [1, 2, 3]]))
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', Is::equalTo('application/json'))
    )->then(
        Respond::withStatusCode(201)->andBody('{"id": 1}')
    );
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

Generate response body based in request data

It could happen that you want to make your response dependent on data you receive in your request. For this cases you can use regexp matching for request url and/or body, and access the subpatterns matches from your response body specification using ${body.matchIndex} or ${url.matchIndex} notation.

Example:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    
    $expectation = Phiremock::on(
        A::posttRequest()->andUrl(Is::matching('~/example_service/(\w+)/?id=(\d+)~'))
            ->andBody(Is::matching('~\{"name" : "([^"]+)"\}~'))
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', Is::equalTo('application/json'))
    )->then(
        Respond::withStatusCode(200)->andBody('The resource is ${url.1}, the id is ${url.2} and the name is ${body.1}')
    );
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

Also retrieving data from multiple matches is supported:

 use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    
    $expectation = Phiremock::on(
        A::posttRequest()->andUrl(Is::matching('/peoples-brothers-list/json'))
            ->andBody(Is::matching('%"name"\s*:\s*"([^"]*)",\s*"brothers"\s*:\s*(\d+)%'))
            ->andHeader('Content-Type', Is::equalTo('application/json'))
    )->then(
        Respond::withStatusCode(200)->andBody(
            '${body.1} has ${body.2} brothers, ${body.1.2} has ${body.2.2} brothers,'
            . ' ${body.1.3} has ${body.2.3} brothers'
        )
    );
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

Shorthand syntax for common requests

Phiremock is a bit too much expressive to create requests and that is a bit annoying when writing simple stubs. For that, there is a simpler syntax using Phiremock::onRequest method.

Example:

    use Mcustiel\Phiremock\Client\Phiremock;

    $phiremock = new Phiremock('phiremock.server', '8080');
    
    $expectation = Phiremock::onRequest('get', '/my/example/url')->thenRespond(200, 'This is the response');
    $phiremock->createExpectation($expectation);

Appendix

List of condition matchers:

  • contains: Checks that the given section of the http request contains the specified string.
  • isEqualTo: Checks that the given section of the http request is equal to the one specified, case sensitive.
  • isSameString: Checks that the given section of the http request is equal to the one specified, case insensitive.
  • matches: Checks that the given section of the http request matches the regular expression specified.

Contributing:

Just submit a pull request. Don't forget to run tests and php-cs-fixer first and write documentation.

Thanks to:

And everyone who submitted their Pull Requests.