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format is basically the golang fmt package, but spelled correctly, without the AWOL characters, the ambiguities, and the archaic ambience. No offense...
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README.md

fmt is bsclly t fmt pckg, bt splld crctly, wtht t AWL chrctrs, t ambgts, a t arcc ambnc.

It's a mx btwn a jk a a jb, a srvs as my plea t th glng comnty t qt trng t b clvr a trs a lrn t use cmplt wrds whn nmng stff. Nms r imprtnt. Cd is tpd 1 a rd hndrds o tms thrftr. It's wrth th xtra efrt in th end t b spcfc.


Translation:

format is basically the fmt package, but spelled correctly, without the AWOL characters, the ambiguities, and the archaic ambiance.

It's a mix between a joke and a jab, and serves as my plea to the golang community to quit trying to be clever and terse and learn to use complete words when naming stuff. Names are important. Code is typed once and read hundreds of times thereafter. It's worth the extra effort in the end to be specific.

Be a professional. Write complete names. Yes, you heard me: purposely cutting corners where spelling is concerned is unprofessional[1]. Don't hate me, just switch to an editor that provides auto-complete and commit to do better. You'll thank me later. GoLang is awesome. Let's be awesome gophers.

There, I said it. I feel better now. Thanks.


[1] Yes, of course there are (a few, and only a few) exceptions:

  • Single-letter variables used as counters in tightly scoped loops.
  • Well-defined acronyms from the field of computing and your specific problem domain.

That's about it. Oh, and maybe err. But every time you use it you should feel guilty for using a verb where a noun was called for...

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