A minimal RSpec clone
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README.markdown

Speccify

The lightweight option.

Website Lighthouse GoogleGroup RDoc

Features:

Nested Contexts

Custom matchers are no-brainers with def_matcher

Blazing Fast

100% Ruby 1.9 and 1.8 compatible

Rails out of the box!

Sophisticated Expectations/Matchers System

< 300 LOC (sans doc)

Install Speccify:

sudo gem install speccify

Using Speccify

Create a testfile:

		# test_object.rb  
		
		require "rubygems"  
		require "speccify"  

		describe Object do  
		  before do  
		    @obj = Object.new  
		  end 
		
		  it "is not nil" do
		    @obj.should_not be_nil
		  end
		  
		  it "can be frozen" do
		    @obj.freeze
		    @obj.should be_frozen
		  end
		end

Run it with the ruby command:

$ ruby test_object.rb
Loaded suite -
Started
..
Finished in 0.001820 seconds.

2 tests, 2 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors

Using Speccify with autotest

  1. Name your testfiles test_whatever.rb
  2. Start autotest
  3. There is no step three ...

Using Speccify with Rails

Use the default rails test directory/structure, testhelpers, assertions and infrastructure.

  1. require 'speccify' in test_helper.rb
  2. write a spec.
  3. There is no step three ...

Tell Speccify what kind of test he is, by passing one of the following options to the describe method:

  • :type => ActiveSupport::TestCase
  • :type => ActionController::TestCase
  • :type => ActionMailer::TestCase
  • :type => ActionView::TestCase

Example, Functional Test:

	describe HorstsController, :type => ActionController::TestCase do
	  it "should get index" do
	    get :index
	    @response.should be_success
	    assigns(:horsts).should_not be_nil
	  end
		describe "Whatever" do
		  # I'm still a ActionController::TestCase
		  it "should get index" do
		    get :index
		    @response.should be_success
		    assigns(:horsts).should_not be_nil
		  end
		end
	end

I'm not sure if I should wrap all the rails assertions in matchers. Using the default rails assertions works fine.

Built in matchers

  • be_something, for any arbitrary something:

      @obj.should be_something
      # passes if @obj.something? is true
    
  • have(n).somethings, for any arbitrary something:

      @obj.should have(3).somethings
      # passes if @obj.somethings.length == 3
    
  • change {something}

      lambda {@var+=1}.should change {@var}
      # passes
      lambda { }.should change {@var}
      # fails
      @var = 1
      lambda {@var+=1}.should change {@var}.from(1).to(2)
      # passes
    
  • more

DEF_MATCHER

A simple example first:

    def_matcher :be_nil do |given, matcher, args|
      given.nil?
    end
    nil.should be_nil

The def_matcher method is really simple to use.
You just provide it the name of your matcher and attach a block that defines it's behavior. The return value of the block is a boolean that actually will be expected (should) or not expected (should_not).

There are three arguments available inside the matcher block:

given

This is the object that has received the should or should_not.

matcher

This is the matcher object. You can set the failure messages as attributes on this object:

      def_matcher :matcher_name do |given, matcher, args|
        matcher.positive_msg = "You can see me if I am applied to should and I return a false value"
        matcher.negative_msg = "You can see me if I am applied to should_not and I return a true value"
      end 

It holds a list of all methods that have been called on the matcher (for chaining):

      obj.should matcher_name.some_method(4,5,6) {"and a block"}.second
      def_matcher :matcher_name do |given, matcher, args|
        # this is an ostruct that holds all information about the first method 'some_method'
        matcher.msgs[0] 
        # this is an ostruct that holds all information about the second method 'second'
        matcher.msgs[1] 
        # this is the name of the first method:
        matcher.msgs[0].name  #=> :some_method
					# this is a list of arguments that have been passed to the first method:
        matcher.msgs[0].args  #=> [4,5,6]
					# this is the block that was attached:
        matcher.msgs[0].block #=> proc {"and a block"}
      end

If there is a failure, it knows where:

      def_matcher :matcher_name do |given, matcher, args|
        matcher.loc #=> "./some/where.rb:55 ... "
      end

args

This is a list of all arguments that have been applied to the matcher. Like the 6 in:

     (3*3).should_not be(6)

More def_matcher examples

A little more complex:

		def_matcher :be_in_range do |given, matcher, args|
		  range = args[1] ? (args[0]..args[1]) : args[0]
		  matcher.positive_msg = "expected #{given} to be in range (#{range})"
		  matcher.negative_msg = "expected #{given} not to be in range (#{range})"
		  range.include?(given)
		end
		2.should be_in_range(1,3)
		"m".should be_in_range("a".."z")

Matchers may receive messages:

		def_matcher :have do |given, matcher, args|
		  number = args[0]
		  actual = given.send(matcher.msgs[0].name).length
		  matcher.positive_msg = "Expected #{given} to have #{actual}, but found #{number} "
		  actual == number
		end
		class Thing
		  def widgets
		    @widgets ||= []
		  end
		end
		@thing.should have(3).widgets

Speccify vs. RSpec

Speccify provides the parts of RSpec that actually matter (to me):

  • The familiar describe/it syntax
  • nested contexts
  • should/should_not
  • matchers and custom matchers

Things that actually doesn't matter (to me):

  • /spec directory instead of /test
  • whatever_spec.rb instead of test_whatever.rb
  • custom formatters
  • custom runners
  • html output
  • special commandline tools
  • shared example groups
  • pending examples
  • before_all, after_all, before_suite, after_suite

Contribution

License

(The MIT License)

Copyright (c) Matthias Hennemeyer

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the 'Software'), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED 'AS IS', WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.