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TypeScript 3.6 Iteration Plan #31639

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DanielRosenwasser opened this issue May 29, 2019 · 6 comments

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commented May 29, 2019

This document outlines our focused tasks for TypeScript 3.6, as well as some of the discussion that explains how/why we prioritized certain work items. Nothing is set in stone, but we will strive to complete them in a reasonable timeframe.

Note that this release shifts TypeScript from a 2-month release cycle to a 3-month release cycle.

Dates

  • 3.5 ships (May 29th)
  • TypeScript 3.6 Beta
    • Snap on July 12th
      • Kick off build for CTI
    • Release on July 16th
  • First VS Code Insiders Build: August 1st?
  • TypeScript 3.6 RC
    • Snap on August 9th
      • Kick off build for CTI
      • Kick off insiders for VS Code
    • Release on August 13th
  • TypeScript 3.6 Final
    • Snap on August 23rd
      • Kick off build for CTI
      • Kick off insiders for VS Code
    • Release on August 27th 🚀

Work Items

Expected Work Items

Deferred Work Items

None from planning meeting


Planning Meeting Notes

Motivations

  • Bug backlog
  • Goals and current 6-month roadmap
  • GitHub user feedback (👍s)
  • Feedback from customer interviews, social media, past iteration plans
  • Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code feedback, as well as new functionality demands
  • Actionable PRs (need to make a call)

General (compiler/infrastructure/reliability)

  • Bugs bugs bugs
    • We simply haven't caught up with these from 3.4/3.5.
    • Committed
  • Strongly typed iterators and generators
    • PR out
  • Stricter types for IteratorResult
    • PR out.
  • ECMAScript private instance fields
    • PR out.
  • APIs for composite projects (--build mode)
    • PR out.
  • More accurate array spread.
    • PR out.
  • UX on Promises
    • High value for all users, useful to partner teams.
    • Committed
  • Investigate TypeScript plugin APIs 🏃
    • Ongoing.
  • --declaration and --allowJs
    • Concerns with edge cases.
    • Can use the GitHub crawler to see how stable it is.
    • Do the work and let the crawler find the tail of bugs before we're ready to commit.
  • Testing infra
    • Automated testing infrastructure for language service on real world code and DefinitelyTyped
    • Test tiering - faster local tests, longer CI runs
    • Release process overhaul
      • Need to enable automated cherry-picking.
      • Enable experimental feature branching
      • Must document the process here.
      • typescript-bot commenting that PRs don't have associated issues with a milestone.
    • All of these, yes
  • Migrate repo to ESLint
    • Seems doable, @a-tarasyuk seems interested in helping!

Productivity

@fatcerberus

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commented May 30, 2019

What’s meant by “snap”? I know it’s a football metaphor, but I’m not sure what it means in terms of release scheduling.

@weswigham

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commented May 30, 2019

"snap" short for "snapshot" as in "to capture (a release)" - nothing to do with football in this context, I think.

@fatcerberus

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commented May 30, 2019

Oh - I thought it was a football metaphor since the items immediately below are “kick off X”. Thanks, snapshot makes more sense!

@weswigham

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commented May 30, 2019

“kick off X” as in "to start X" heh, fair - I think that turn of phrase actually does come from football.

@RyanCavanaugh

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commented May 30, 2019

TL;DR during the next over we're scrumming the uprights and chipping the wicket.

@DanielRosenwasser

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commented May 31, 2019

I thought it was about branches snapping like on a tree even though that actually makes no sense since the branches are growing, not breaking.

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