A hybrid between LaTeX and Markdown, for quicker writing.
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README.md

TeXDown

What is TeXDown

TeXDown, as a set of three python scripts, interpreter.py, texdown.py and help.py, is a transpiler that converts a Markdown/LaTex hybrid to LaTeX.

As a languange, TeXDown intends to be a custom flavour of markdown, with simple documents and easy typing in mind, while still retaining LaTeX files' professional presentation.

It obeys to most of the github-flavoured markdown standards, while including other elements (such as easily gathered equations or macro defining tags), so that while it may serve as a Markdown-To-LaTeX transpiler, it can also go beyond standard Markdown capabilities and offer tools that help in writing math and LaTeX files in general.


Using the compiler

A TexDown file can be compiled using the texdown.py script.

In the same directory as the interpreter.py, texdown.py and help.py scripts, run

python texdown.py --help

for more details.


What can TeXDown do

As of the time of writing, TeXDown features:

  • Text formatting:
    • Bold
    • Emphasis/itallics
    • Underline
    • Strikeout
  • Multiple formulas
    • Numbered
    • Unumbered
    • Easy centered formulas
  • Inline code
  • block code
    • With caption
  • Author/Date/Title tags
  • Easy macro tags
  • Easy include tags
  • Easy
    • theorems
    • lemmas
    • corollaries
      • Named
      • Unnamed
  • Sections
  • Blockquotes
  • Lists
    • Ordered
    • Unordered
  • Tables
    • Ugly
    • Pretty
      • With captions
  • Pure LaTeX
  • Images

and does not yet implement

  • Links

These are always updated in the todo.md file.


Example file

An example file, example.txd, is provided, showing off most of TeXDown's capabilities.


Why TeXDown

TeXDown doesn't intend to replace either Markdown or LaTeX. In fact, it is more useful when used in conjunction with raw LaTeX; it eases the creation of templates or rough document drafts, while maintaining ease of code reading, that can then be further tweaked.

In this sense, TeXDown intends to bridge a gap between the powerful, but sometimes cumbersome, LaTeX language, and the easy to read and write Markdown language.

Nonetheless, pure LaTeX in TeXDown isn't touched (unless recognized as a markdown command), so it can always be used in a TeXDown file.


Unit cases

WYSIWYG

A blank TeXDown file is valid, compiling to an empty (with boilerplate code) LaTeX file.

Some commonly used packages are already included.

TeXDown file:

TeXDown Source

TeX output:

TeX Source Output
% Start of header.
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{caption}
\usepackage{amsthm}

\setlength{\jot}{8pt}
% End of header
% Start of body.

\begin{document}


\end{document}
% End of body.

Standard markdow elements

Most github-flavoured markdown elements are supported, with the following differences:

  • Subitems in lists can't be order or unordered; they're of the same type as the parent list, and indicated with tabs or 4 spaces.
  • Raw HTML isn't (for obvious reasons) supported; however, LaTeX is, as long as it can't be interpreted as Markdown.
  • Please refer to todo.md for updates.

TeXDown file:

TeXDown Source
# This is a section

## This is a subsection

### Subsubsection

#### Paragraph

##### Subparagraph

This is text,
and this is still the same paragraph.

** BOLD **

// italics (same as emphasis) // or *emphasis*

__underline__

** Some //really// __nested__ and I mean __//nested//__ formats. **

~~~strikeout~~~

~~strikeout w/ 2 tildes~~

`Some inline code?`

​```python
# SHOULD BE A COMMENT
print 'This is some code'
​```

Horizontal ruler:

---

or

***

. An
. Unordered
. List
    with
    sub
    items
        and
        sub
        items

1. A
2. Really
    Sexy
3. Ordered
4. List

| Tables        | Are           | Cool  |
| ------------- |:-------------:| -----:|
| col 3 is      | right-aligned | \$1600 |
| col 2 is      | centered      |   \$12 |
| zebra stripes | are neat      |    \$1 |

~~Markdown~~ TeXDown | Less | Pretty
:--- | --- | ---
*Still* | `renders` | **nicely**
 1 | 2 | 3

Blockquotes are also supported:
> Here is a quote,
> made using TeXDown.

TeX output:

TeX Output
% Start of header.
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage[normalem]{ulem}
\usepackage{listings}
\usepackage{caption}
\usepackage{tabulary}
\usepackage{csquotes}
\usepackage{amsthm}

\setlength{\jot}{8pt}
% End of header
% Start of body.

\begin{document}

\section{This is a section}

\subsection{This is a subsection}

\subsubsection{Subsubsection}

\paragraph{Paragraph}

\subparagraph{Subparagraph}

This is text,
and this is still the same paragraph.

\textbf{BOLD}

\emph{italics (same as emphasis)} or \emph{emphasis}

\underline{underline}

\textbf{Some \emph{really} \underline{nested} and I mean \underline{\emph{nested}} formats.}

\sout{strikeout}

\sout{strikeout w/ 2 tildes}

\lstinline[columns=fixed]$Some inline code?$

\begin{lstlisting}[language=python,]
# SHOULD BE A COMMENT
print 'This is some code'
\end{lstlisting}

Horizontal ruler:

\vspace{0.2mm}\rule{\textwidth}{0.4pt}
\vspace{0.2mm}

or

\vspace{0.2mm}\rule{\textwidth}{0.4pt}
\vspace{0.2mm}

\begin{itemize}
\item An
\item Unordered
\item List
\begin{itemize}
\item with
\item sub
\item items
\begin{itemize}
\item and
\item sub
\item items
\end{itemize}
\end{itemize}
\end{itemize}
\begin{enumerate}
\item A
\item Really
\begin{enumerate}
\item Sexy
\end{enumerate}
\item Ordered
\item List
\end{enumerate}

\begin{table}[hbpt]
\noindent\makebox[\textwidth]{
\centering
\setlength{\tabcolsep}{10pt}
\renewcommand{\arraystretch}{1.5}
\begin{tabulary}{\paperwidth}{ |L|C|R|L| }
\hline
Tables & Are & Cool \\ \hline \hline
col 3 is & right-aligned & \$1600 \\ \hline
col 2 is & centered & \$12 \\ \hline
zebra stripes & are neat & \$1 \\ \hline
\end{tabulary}
}
\label{table1}
\end{table}

\begin{table}[hbpt]
\noindent\makebox[\textwidth]{
\centering
\setlength{\tabcolsep}{10pt}
\renewcommand{\arraystretch}{1.5}
\begin{tabulary}{\paperwidth}{ |L|L|L| }
\hline
\sout{Markdown} TeXDown & Less & Pretty \\ \hline \hline
\emph{Still} & \lstinline[columns=fixed]$renders$ & \textbf{nicely} \\ \hline
1 & 2 & 3 \\ \hline
\end{tabulary}
}
\label{table2}
\end{table}

Blockquotes are also supported:
\begin{displayquote}
Here is a quote,

made using TeXDown.
\end{displayquote}

\end{document}
% End of body.

Inclusion of metadata and packages

Name, author or date of writing are all optional and can be defined at any point in the document, using the tags:

[author:My Name]
[title:My Title]
[date:The Date]

Packages can at any point be included, with optional arguments, using:

[include:packageName,argument,argument]

TeXDown file:

TeXDown Source
Content.

[title:TeXDown Tests]
[author:Miguel Murça]
% Date is suppressed, but does not cause error!

More content.

[include:library, argument]

LaTeX Output:

TeX Output
% Start of header.
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[argument]{library}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{caption}
\usepackage{amsthm}

\setlength{\jot}{8pt}

\title{TeXDown Tests}
\author{Miguel Murça}
\date{}
% End of header
% Start of body.

\begin{document}

\maketitle
Content.

% Date is suppressed, but does not cause error!

More content.
\end{document}
% End of body.

Easily define Commands

Custom commands can at any time be defined using any of the tags

[define:command]
[macro:otherCommand]

They can include arguments, which are identified by #number:

TeXDown file:

TeXDown Source
[define:myMacro,\LaTeX{} expanded content]

\myMacro

[define:macroWithArg, my name is #1]

\macroWithArg{TeXDown}

LaTeX output:

TeX Output
% Start of header.
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{caption}
\usepackage{amsthm}

\newcommand{\myMacro}[0]{\LaTeX{} expanded content}
\newcommand{\macroWithArg}[1]{my name is #1}

\setlength{\jot}{8pt}
% End of header
% Start of body.

\begin{document}

\myMacro

\vspace{5mm}

\macroWithArg{TeXDown}
\end{document}
% End of body.

Captions

Code and tables can easily be captioned:

TeXDown code:

TeXDown Source
| Tables        | Are           | Cool  |
| ------------- |:-------------:| -----:|
| col 3 is      | right-aligned | \$1600 |
| col 2 is      | centered      |   \$12 |
| zebra stripes | are neat      |    \$1 |
    Table caption

```python

myStr = 'example'
def longExample:
    foo = input()
    bar = raw_input()

    for i in range(1,input()):
        pass
    # Long

```Code caption

LaTeX output:

TeX Output
% Start of header.
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{listings}
\usepackage{caption}
\usepackage{tabulary}
\usepackage{amsthm}

\setlength{\jot}{8pt}
% End of header
% Start of body.

\begin{document}

\begin{table}[hbpt]
\noindent\makebox[\textwidth]{
\centering
\setlength{\tabcolsep}{10pt}
\renewcommand{\arraystretch}{1.5}
\begin{tabulary}{\paperwidth}{ |L|C|R|L| }
\hline
Tables & Are & Cool \\ \hline \hline
col 3 is & right-aligned & \$1600 \\ \hline
col 2 is & centered & \$12 \\ \hline
zebra stripes & are neat & \$1 \\ \hline
\end{tabulary}
}
\caption{
    Table caption
}
\label{table1}
\end{table}

\begin{lstlisting}[language=python,caption=Code caption]

myStr = 'example'
def longExample:
    foo = input()
    bar = raw_input()

    for i in range(1,input()):
        pass
    # Long

\end{lstlisting}
\end{document}
% End of body.

Math

Inline math, block math, and gathered formulas are suported, with or without numbering (using the amsthm package).

Braced equations are also supported, using the empheq package.

TeXDown code:

TeXDown Source
Inline math:

$\sqrt{a^2 + b^2} = c$

Block math:

$$ \nabla^2 \psi = \frac{1}{v^2} \frac{\partial^2 \psi}{\partial t^2} $$

Multiple lines (numbered):

$$$
(x-1)^2 + y^2 = 1

x^2 - 2x + 1 + y^2 = 1

x^2 - 2x + y^2 = 0

r^2 - 2r \cos \theta = 0

r = 0 \lor r = 2 \cos \theta
$$$

Multiple lines (unnumbered):

$$$*
x^2 + (y-1)^2 = 1

x^2 + y^2 -2y = 0

r^2 - 2r \sin \theta = 0

r = 0 \lor r = 2 \sin \theta
$$$

Braced equations:

[braces]
    x^2 + (y-1)^2 = 1
    x^2 + y^2 -2y = 0
    r^2 - 2r \sin \theta = 0
    r = 0 \lor r = 2 \sin \theta

LaTeX output:

TeX Output
% Start of header.
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{empheq}
\usepackage{caption}
\usepackage{amsthm}

\setlength{\jot}{8pt}
% End of header
% Start of body.

\begin{document}

Inline math:

$\sqrt{a^2 + b^2} = c$

Block math:

$$ \nabla^2 \psi = \frac{1}{v^2} \frac{\partial^2 \psi}{\partial t^2} $$

Multiple lines (numbered):

\begin{gather}
(x-1)^2 + y^2 = 1\\
x^2 - 2x + 1 + y^2 = 1\\
x^2 - 2x + y^2 = 0\\
r^2 - 2r \cos \theta = 0\\
r = 0 \lor r = 2 \cos \theta
\end{gather}

Multiple lines (unnumbered):

\begin{gather*}
x^2 + (y-1)^2 = 1\\
x^2 + y^2 -2y = 0\\
r^2 - 2r \sin \theta = 0\\
r = 0 \lor r = 2 \sin \theta
\end{gather*}

Braced equations:

\begin{empheq}[left=\empheqlbrace\,]{align}
& x^2 + (y-1)^2 = 1\\
& x^2 + y^2 -2y = 0\\
& r^2 - 2r \sin \theta = 0\\
& r = 0 \lor r = 2 \sin \theta
\end{empheq}

\end{document}
% End of body.

Theorems, lemmas, and similar

Theorems, lemmas, and similar relevant blocks can be defined with one of the following tags:

TeXDown file:

TeXDown Source

[Theorem]
    Unnamed theorem.

[theorem:Name]
    A named theorem

[Lemma]
    A lemma

For example:

[theorem:Pythagorean Theorem]
    A rectangle triangle of sides $a$, $b$ and $c$ must be
    such that $a^2 + b^2 = c^2$

LaTeX output:

TeX Output
% Start of header.
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{caption}
\usepackage{amsthm}

\setlength{\jot}{8pt}

\newtheorem{theorem0}{Theorem}
\newtheorem*{theorem1}{Name}
\newtheorem{theorem2}{Lemma}
\newtheorem*{theorem3}{Pythagorean Theorem}
% End of header
% Start of body.

\begin{document}

\begin{theorem0}
    Unnamed theorem.
\end{theorem0}

\begin{theorem1}
    A named theorem
\end{theorem1}

\begin{theorem2}
    A lemma
\end{theorem2}

For example:

\begin{theorem3}
    A rectangle triangle of sides $a$, $b$ and $c$ must be
    such that $a^2 + b^2 = c^2$
\end{theorem3}
\end{document}
% End of body.

Images

Images can be included using standard Markdown syntax.

Images are automatically fit to the width of the page, as well as labeled (with \label) with the name of the file (without the extension).

The image tags are minipage aware, so that two (or more) figures can be shown side by side.

TeXDown file:

TeXDown Source

(A folder named figures is in the same directory as the source file, and contains graphA.png and graphB.png.)

[figpath:./figures/]

![A caption.](graphA)

![This figure has a longer caption
    because a lot of the time, science documents
    caption their figures with really long captions.](graphB)

\begin{minipage}[0.5\textwidth]
    ![Caption 1](img1)
\end{minipage}
\begin{minipage}[0.5\textwidth]
    ![Caption 2](img2)
\end{minipage}

LaTeX output:

TeX Output
% Start of header.
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{caption}
\usepackage{amsthm}

\setlength{\jot}{8pt}
\graphicspath{{./figures/}}
% End of header
% Start of body.

\begin{document}

\begin{figure}[hbtp]
\includegraphics[width=\textwidth,keepaspectratio]{graphA}
	\caption{A caption.}
	\label{graphA}
\end{figure}

\begin{figure}[hbtp]
\includegraphics[width=\textwidth,keepaspectratio]{graphB}
	\caption{This figure has a longer caption
		because a lot of the time, science documents
		caption their figures with really long captions.}
	\label{graphB}
\end{figure}

\begin{minipage}[0.5\textwidth]
	\centering
	\includegraphics[width=\textwidth,keepaspectratio]{img1}
	\captionof{figure}{Caption 1}
	\label{img1}

\end{minipage}
\begin{minipage}[0.5\textwidth]
	\centering
	\includegraphics[width=\textwidth,keepaspectratio]{img2}
	\captionof{figure}{Caption 2}
	\label{img2}

\end{minipage}
\end{document}
% End of body.