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An unobtrusive full-stack web framework for node.js and the browser

branch: master
README.md

flatiron Build Status

Framework components for node.js and the browser

Example HTTP Server:

var flatiron = require('flatiron'),
    app = flatiron.app;

app.use(flatiron.plugins.http);

app.router.get('/', function () {
  this.res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
  this.res.end('Hello world!\n');
});

app.start(8080);

Example HTTPS Server:

var flatiron = require('flatiron'),
    app = flatiron.app;

app.use(flatiron.plugins.http, {
  https: {
    cert: 'path/to/cert.pem',
    key: 'path/to/key.pem',
    ca: 'path/to/ca.pem'
  }
});

app.router.get('/', function () {
  this.res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
  this.res.end('Hello world!\n');
});

app.start(8080);

Example CLI Application:

// example.js

var flatiron = require('flatiron'),
    app = flatiron.app;

app.use(flatiron.plugins.cli, {
  dir: __dirname,
  usage: [
    'This is a basic flatiron cli application example!',
    '',
    'hello - say hello to somebody.'
  ]
});

app.cmd('hello', function () {
  app.prompt.get('name', function (err, result) {
    app.log.info('hello '+result.name+'!');
  })
})

app.start();

Run It:

% node example.js hello
prompt: name: world
info:   hello world!

Installation

Installing NPM (Node Package Manager)

  curl http://npmjs.org/install.sh | sh

Installing Flatiron

  [sudo] npm install flatiron

Installing Union (Required for flatiron.plugins.http)

  npm install union

Usage:

Start With flatiron.app:

flatiron.app is a broadway injection container. To be brief, what it does is allow plugins to modify the app object directly:

var flatiron = require('flatiron'),
    app = require('app');

var hello = {
  attach: function (options) {
    this.hello = options.message || 'Why hello!';
  }
};

app.use(hello, {
  message: "Hi! How are you?"
});

// Will print, "Hi! How are you?"
console.log(app.hello);

Virtually all additional functionality in flatiron comes from broadway plugins, such as flatiron.plugins.http and flatiron.plugins.cli.

app.config

flatiron.app comes with a config plugin pre-loaded, which adds configuration management courtesy nconf. app.config has the same api as the nconf object.

The literal store is configured by default. If you want to use different stores you can easily attach them to the app.config instance.

// add the `env` store to the config
app.config.use('env');

// add the `file` store the the config
app.config.use('file', { file: 'path/to/config.json' });

// or using an alternate syntax
app.config.env().file({ file: 'path/to/config.json' });

// and removing stores
app.config.remove('literal');

app.log

flatiron.app will also load a log plugin during the init phase, which attaches a winston container to app.log. This logger is configured by combining the app.options.log property with the configuration retrieved from app.config.get('log').

Create An HTTP Server with flatiron.plugins.http(options):

This plugin adds http serving functionality to your flatiron app by attaching the following properties and methods:

Define Routes with app.router:

This is a director router configured to route http requests after the middlewares in app.http.before are applied. Example routes include:

// GET /
app.router.get('/', function () {
  this.res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
  this.res.end('Hello world!\n');
});

// POST to /
app.router.post('/', function () {
  this.res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
  this.res.write('Hey, you posted some cool data!\n');
  this.res.end(util.inspect(this.req.body, true, 2, true) + '\n');
});

// Parameterized routes
app.router.get('/sandwich/:type', function (type) {
  if (~['bacon', 'burger'].indexOf(type)) {
    this.res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
    this.res.end('Serving ' + type + ' sandwich!\n');
  }
  else {
    this.res.writeHead(404, { 'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
    this.res.end('No such sandwich, sorry!\n');
  }
});

app.router can also route against regular expressions and more! To learn more about director's advanced functionality, visit director's project page.

Access The Server with app.server:

This is a union middleware kernel.

Modify the Server Options with app.http:

This object contains options that are passed to the union server, including app.http.before, app.http.after and app.http.headers.

These properties may be set by passing them through as options:

app.use(flatiron.plugins.http, {
  before: [],
  after: []
});

You can read more about these options on the union project page.

Start The Server with app.start(<host>, port, <callback(err)>)

This method will both call app.init (which will call any asynchronous initialization steps on loaded plugins) and start the http server with the given arguments. For example, the following will start your flatiron http server on port 8080:

app.start(8080);

Create a CLI Application with flatiron.plugins.cli(options)

This plugin turns your app into a cli application framework. For example, jitsu uses flatiron and the cli plugin.

Valid options include:

{
  "argvOptions": {}, // A configuration hash passed to the cli argv parser.
  "usage": [ "foo", "bar" ], // A message to show for cli usage. Joins arrays with `\n`.
  "dir": require('path').join(__dirname, 'lib', 'commands'), // A directory with commands to lazy-load
  "notFoundUsage": false // Disable help messages when command not found
}

Add lazy-loaded CLI commands with options.dir and app.commands:

Flatiron CLI will automatically lazy-load modules defining commands in the directory specified by options.dir. For example:

// example2.js
var path = require('path'),
    flatiron = require('./lib/flatiron'),
    app = flatiron.app;

app.use(flatiron.plugins.cli, {
  dir: path.join(__dirname, 'cmds')
});

app.start();
// cmd/highfive.js
var highfive = module.exports = function highfive (person, cb) {
  this.log.info('High five to ' + person + '!');
  cb(null);
};

In the command, you expose a function of arguments and a callback. this is set to app, and the routing is taken care of automatically.

Here it is in action:

% node example2.js highfive Flatiron 
info:   High five to Flatiron!

You can also define these commands by adding them directly to app.commands yourself:

// example2b.js
var flatiron = require('./lib/flatiron'),
    app = flatiron.app;

var path = require('path'),
    flatiron = require('./lib/flatiron'),
    app = flatiron.app;

app.use(flatiron.plugins.cli);

app.commands.highfive = function (person, cb) {
  this.log.info('High five to ' + person + '!');
  cb(null);
};

app.start();
% node example2b.js highfive Flatiron 
info:   High five to Flatiron!

Callback will always be the last argument provided to a function assigned to command

app.commands.highfive = function (person, cb) {
  this.log.info('High five to ' + person + '!');
  console.log(arguments);
}
% node example2b.js highfive Flatiron lol haha
info:    High five to Flatiron!
{
  '0': 'Flatiron',
  '1': 'lol',
  '2': 'haha',
  '3': [Function]
}

Define Ad-Hoc Commands With app.cmd(path, handler):

This adds the cli routing path path to the app's CLI router, using the director route handler handler, aliasing app.router.on. cmd routes are defined the same way as http routes, except that it uses (a space) for a delimiter instead of /.

For example:

// example.js
var flatiron = require('./lib/flatiron'),
    app = flatiron.app;

app.use(flatiron.plugins.cli, {
  usage: [
    'usage: node test.js hello <person>',
    '',
    '  This will print "hello <person>"'
  ]
});

app.cmd('hello :person', function (person) {
  app.log.info('hello ' + person + '!');
});

app.start()

When you run this program correctly, it will say hello:

% node example.js hello person
info:   hello person!

If not, you get a friendly usage message:

% node test.js hello
help:   usage: node test.js hello <person>
help:
help:     This will print "hello <person>"

Check CLI Arguments with app.argv:

Once your app is started, app.argv will contain the optimist-parsed argv options hash, ready to go!

Here's an example:

// example3.js
var flatiron = require('./lib/flatiron'),
    app = flatiron.app;

app.use(flatiron.plugins.cli);

app.start();

app.log.info(JSON.stringify(app.argv));

This prints:

% node example3.js
info:    {"_":[], "$0": "node ./example3.js"}

Awesome!

Add a Default Help Command with options.usage:

When attaching the CLI plugin, just specify options.usage to get a friendly default message for when there aren't any matching routes:

// example4.js
var flatiron = require('./lib/flatiron'),
    app = flatiron.app;

app.use(flatiron.plugins.cli, {
  usage: [
    'Welcome to my app!',
    'Your command didn\'t do anything.',
    'This is expected.'
  ]
});

app.start();
% node example4.js 
help:   Welcome to my app!
help:   Your command didn't do anything.
help:   This is expected.

Start The Application with app.start(callback):

As seen in these examples, starting your app is as easy as app.start! this method takes a callback, which is called when an app.command completes. Here's a complete example demonstrating this behavior and how it integrates with options.usage:

// example5.js
var path = require('path'),
    flatiron = require('./lib/flatiron'),
    app = flatiron.app;

app.use(flatiron.plugins.cli, {
  usage: [
    '`node example5.js error`: Throws an error.',
    '`node example5.js friendly`: Does not throw an error.'
  ]
});

app.commands.error = function (cb) {
  cb(new Error('I\'m an error!'));
};

app.commands.friendly = function (cb) {
  cb(null);
}

app.start(function (err) {
  if (err) {
    app.log.error(err.message || 'You didn\'t call any commands!');
    app.log.warn('NOT OK.');
    return process.exit(1);
  }
  app.log.info('OK.');
});

Here's how our app behaves:

% node example5.js friendly
info:   OK.

% node example5.js error
error:  I'm an error!
warn:   NOT OK.

% node example5.js
help:   `node example2b.js error`: Throws an error.
help:   `node example2b.js friendly`: Does not throw an error.
error:  You didn't call any commands!
warn:   NOT OK.

Read More About Flatiron!

Articles

Sub-Projects

Tests

Tests are written in vows:

  $ npm test

Author: Nodejitsu Inc.

License: MIT

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