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first cut of pp51-56

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commit cb89076790f0dc1c7d6d5fee0ca8199979a79288 1 parent 93dcff6
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4 pages/page_11.txt
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
to forget, that more Princes have been destroyed by their Guards
than by their People; and that even at the time when the Rule
-was Quod Principi placuit Lex esto, the Armies and Pratorian
+was Quod Principi placuit Lex esto, the Armies and Praetorian
Bands which were the Instruments of that unruly Power, were
frequently the means made use of to destroy them who had it.
There will ever be this difference between God and his Vice-
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ of an elevated Mind, to impose an abject and sordid servility,
instead of receiving the willing Sacrifice of Duty and Obedience.
The bravest Princes in all times, who were uncapable of any
other kind of fear, have fear'd to grieve their own People; such
-a fear is a glory, and in this sense ^tis an infamy not to be
+a fear is a glory, and in this sense 'tis an infamy not to be
a Coward: So that the mistaken Heroes who are void of this
generous kind of fear, need no other aggravation to compleat
their ill Characters.
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2  pages/page_28.txt
@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@ Sermons with the same Garnishing, would look like so many
Statues, or Men of Straw in the Pulpit, compared with those
who speak with such a powerful Zeal, that men are tempted
at the moment to believe Heaven it self hath dictated their
-words to ^em.
+words to 'em.
Our Trimmer is not so unreasonably indulgent to the Dis-
senters, as to excuse the Irregularities of their Complaints, and
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2  pages/page_33.txt
@@ -36,4 +36,4 @@ it; by this there was an end put to the hopes some might have
abroad, of making use of his less happy Circumstances, to
throw him into Foreign Interests and Opinions, which had
been wholly inconsistent with our Religion, our Laws, and all
-other things that are dear to us j yet for all this some of those
+other things that are dear to us; yet for all this some of those
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4 pages/page_36.txt
@@ -14,9 +14,9 @@ the most likely to prevail upon them, and how far 'tis advise-
able for the Government to be Indulgent to them; the Lay
Papists generally keep their Religion, rather because they will
not break Company with those of their Party, than out of any
-settled Zeal that hath Root in them j most of them do by the
+settled Zeal that hath Root in them; most of them do by the
Mediation of the Priests Marry amongst one another, to keep
-up an Ignorant Position by hearing only one side j others by
+up an Ignorant Position by hearing only one side; others by
a mistake look upon it as they do upon Escutcheons, the more
Antient Religion of the two; and as some Men of a good
Pedigree will despise meaner Men, tho' never so much superior
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2  pages/page_41.txt
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
contending Powers, who gave us all their Courtship, and offer'd
all their Incense at our Altar, whilst the Fate of either Prince
seemed to depend upon the Oracles we delivered; for the King
-of England to sit on his Throne, a& in the Supream Court of
+of England to sit on his Throne, as in the Supream Court of
Justice, to which the two great Monarchs appeal, pleading their
Cause, and expecting their Sentence declaring which side was
in the right, or at least if we pleas'd which side should have the
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2  pages/page_47.txt
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ ship flies to some other Prince or State, where the same part
is to be acted over again; leaveth the old mistaken Friend to
Neglect and Contempt, and like an insolent Lover to a Cast off
Mistress, Reproaches her with that Infamy, of which he him-
-self was the Author. Sweden, Bavaria, Palatine, $c. may by
+self was the Author. Sweden, Bavaria, Palatine, &c. may by
their Fresh Examples, teach other Princes what they are
reasonably to expect, and what Snakes are hid under the
Flowers the Court of France so liberally throweth upon them
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79 pages/page_51.txt
@@ -1,44 +1,39 @@
-_ _______ _ _ _
+us, misplace our active rage one against another, whilst we are
+turn'd into Statues on that side where lieth our greatest danger;
+to be unconcern' d not only at our Neighbours ruine but our
+own, and let our Island lie like a great Hulk in the Sea, without
+Rudder or Sail, all the Men cast away in her, or as if we were all
+Children in a great Cradle, and rockt asleep to a foreign Tune.
+I say when our Trimmer representeth to his Mind, our
+Roses blasted and discolour'd, whilst the Lilies Triumph and
+grow Insolent upon the Comparison; when he considereth our
+own once flourishing Lawrel, now withered and dying, and
+nothing left us but a remembrance of a better part in History
+than we shall make in the next Age, which will be no more to
+us than an Escutcheon hung upon our Door when we are dead;
+when he foreseeth from hence growing Infamy from abroad,
+confusion at home, and all this without the possibility of a Cure,
+in respect of the voluntary fetters good Men put upon
+themselves by their Allegiance; without a good measure of
+preventing Grace, he would be tempted to go out of the World
+like a Roman Philosopher, rather than endure the burthen of
+Life under such a discouraging Prospect. But Mistakes, as all
+other things, have their Periods, and many times the nearest way
+to Cure, is not to oppose them, but stay till they are crusht with
+their own weight: for Nature will not allow any thing to
+continue long that is violent; violence is a wound, and as a
+wound must be curable in a little time, or else; tis Mortal, but
+a Nation comes near to be Immortal, therefore the wound will
+one time or another be cured, tho perhaps by such rough
+Methods, if too long forborn, as may even make the best
+Remedies we can prepare, to be at the same time a Melancholy
+Contemplation to us; there is but one thing (God Almighties
+Providence excepted) to support a Man from sinking under
+these afflicting thoughts, and that is the hopes we draw singly
+from the King himself, without the mixture of any other
+consideration.
-
-g8 T_e C_uracter
-
-__s, n_isplace ou1' active rage __le against a_other, _hilst _e are
-turn_ into Statues on that sidewhere Iieth ourgI'eatest danger;
-to be unco__cern'd _1ot only at our Neighbou_'s ruine but our
-o___J, and let our Island lie lihe a 6reat Hulh in the Sea, _ithout
-R__dder or Sail, all the Men c_st a_ay in he_', or as if we _ere all
-Chil__'en i__ a great Cra_le, and _'ocht asleep to a foreign T__ne.
-I say when our Tr2MMer representeth to his Mind, o__'
-Roses bl_sted an_ discolour'd, _vhilsl the Lilies Tri_mph and
-gro_T Insolent upon the CompaI'ison; _vhen he conside_'eth our
-own once Aouriehing Law_'el, now withered a__d dying, and
-nothing left __s but a remembrance of a better part in History
-than we shall make in the next Age, which will be no more to
-us than an Escutcheon hung u_on our Door when w_ are dead;
-_Then he f_o.r_eseeth from he__ce growi__g Infamy from abroa_,
-__o______fu_ _sion at ho__e, and all this without the possibility of a Cure,
-in respect of the _oluntaTy fette_'s good Men _ut upon
-tl_emselves by their Allegiance ; without a good me_sure of
-' _reventing Grace, he woul_ be te Lnpted to go out of the VVo_'ld
-lihe a Ro1nan Philosopher, rathe_' than enduI'e the burthen of
-Life under such a disco_ragi__e Prospect. But Mistakes, as all
-other things, have their Periods, and many times the nearest way
-', , to Cure, is not to oppose them, but etay till they _re crusht with
-thei_' o_n weight: for N_ture w_ ill _n_ o_ t allow any thing to
-__ ' co__tinue long _at is violent; violence is a wound, and as a
-- woun_ must be cu_'able in a little time, or else 'tis Mortal, b__t
-a Nation co Ines near to be I_n_nortal, therefore the wound will
-_ne time or another be _ured, tho perhaps by such rough
-Methods, if tuo lo_g f_rboTn, as may even make the best
-Remedie8 we can prepare, to be at the same tim_e a Melancholy
-Contemplation to us; there is _ut one thing (God Almighties
-Pro_idence exce_ted) to suppol't _ Man from sinhing under
-these a_i_ting thoughts, and that is the hopes we d_'aw __ingly
-from the King himself, without the mi_ture of any other
-coneideration.
-Th_ the Nation wa8 lavish of their Kin_ness to hi_ at his, _rst
-;,, comi__g, yet thel'e Temaineth still a stock of VVal'n_th in Mens
-Heart_ for him. Besides, the guod InAuences of his hap_y
-Planet
+Tho the Nation was lavish of their Kindness to him at his first
+coming, yet there remaineth still a stock of Warmth in Mens
+Hearts for him. Besides, the good Influences of his happy
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@@ -1,45 +1,34 @@
-__pp _ _ _ _r_ tJ __ _
-
-
-
-
-o.f a '_rimmer. gg
-
-Planet al'e not yet all spent, and tho the Stars of Men __st their
-youth are geneTally dec_lining, _nd ha_e less Fo_'ce, lil_e the Eyes
-of decayi__g Bea_ties, _et by a BIessing peculia_' to himself, _ve
-n_ay yet hope to be sa_d by his A_tumnal Fortu_e; He hath
-something about hi_n that __ill dra_4 d_4n a healing Miracle for
-his and our DeliveT__nce; a Prince which seemeth 6tted for s__ch J
-_n offending Age, in which Mens Crimes have been so gene1'al,
-that the not forgivi1_g his Peo_le had been the destroying of
-then_; whose Gentleness giTetl_ him a natural Do__inion th_t
-hath no bounds, _ith such a noble n_ixture of Greatness and
-Condescention, an engaging Looh, that disaT_neth Men of their ill
-HumouTs, and thei_' _esentments; something i__ hi_n that
-__anteth a Name, _nd can be no more de_ned than it ca__ be
-resisted; a Gift of Heaven, of its last _nishing, whel'e it will be ''_,
-eculiaTly hind; the only Pri_ce in the Wol'ld that dares be ' ,.
-f___iliar, oT that hath _'ight to triumph oveT those forms which _
-were _Tst in_ented tu give awe to those who could not _udee, _ ,._t_
-and to hide Defects from those that cuuId; _ Prince that hath : '_
-e_hausted himself by _is Liberality, and endange_d __imself by '' '
-his MeTcp; _ho out-shineth by his o_n Light and natural
-Vi_ues all the __arnish of studied Acquisitions; his F_ults are
-li_e Shades to a good Pic_ure, oT lihe Allay to Gold, to malce
-it the more useful; he may have some, but for a__y Man to see
-them through so man__ reco__ciling Virtues, is a Sacrilegious
-iece of ill nature, of which no generous Mind can be guilty;
-a __nce that deserveth to be lov'd for his own sahe, e_en
-_ithout the help of a Comparison; our Lo_e, our Duty, and
-our Dange_' all _oi__ to cement our Obedience to hin_; _n shol't,
-whatever he c_n do, it is no more possible for us to be angry
-wjth him, than _ith t.he Banh that secureth us fl'om thc raging
-Sea, the kind Shade t__t hi_et}_ us from the sc'o_'ching Sun,
-the welcon_e Hand t__at reacheth us a Reprie__e, or _ith the
-GuaTdian Angel, that rescueth our Souls from the de_ouril_g
-Ja_s of _Tretched EteTnity, ;,
-
-
-
-n 2 CON-
+Planet are not yet all spent, and tho the Stars of Men past their
+youth are generally declining, and have less Force, like the Eyes
+of decaying Beauties, yet by a Blessing peculiar to himself, we
+may yet hope to be sav'd by his Autumnal Fortune; He hath
+something about him that will draw down a healing Miracle for
+his and our Deliverance; a Prince which seemeth fitted for such
+an offending Age, in which Mens Crimes have been so general,
+that the not forgiving his People had been the destroying of
+them; whose Gentleness giveth him a natural Dominion that
+hath no bounds, with such a noble mixture of Greatness and
+Condescention, an engaging Look, that disarmeth Men of their ill
+Humours, and their Resentments; something in him that
+wanteth a Name, and can be no more defined than it can be
+resisted; a Gift of Heaven, of its last finishing, where it will be
+peculiarly kind; the only Prince in the World that dares be
+familiar, or that hath right to triumph over those forms which
+were first invented to give awe to those who could not judge,
+and to hide Defects from those that could; a Prince that hath
+exhausted himself by his Liberality, and endangered himself by
+his Mercy; who out-shineth by his own Light and natural
+Virtues all the varnish of studied Acquisitions; his Faults are
+like Shades to a good Picture, or like Allay to Gold, to make
+it the more useful; he may have some, but for any Man to see
+them through so many reconciling Virtues, is a Sacrilegious
+piece of ill nature, of which no generous Mind can be guilty;
+a Prince that deserveth to be lov'd for his own sake, even
+without the help of a Comparison; our Love, our Duty, and
+our Danger all join to cement our Obedience to him; in short,
+whatever he can do, it is no more possible for us to be angry
+with him, than with the Bank that secureth us from the raging
+Sea, the kind Shade that hideth us from the scorching Sun,
+the welcome Hand that reacheth us a Reprieve, or with the
+Guardian Angel, that rescueth our Souls from the devouring
+Jaws of wretched Eternity.
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@@ -1,45 +1,35 @@
-____ ___ _ _ _ ___ _______________ _ __ _ _ _____ __ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ ___________ _ __ _ _t_ ___________ __ _ _ _
-
-
-
-_ oo T_e CJea1'ac'ter
-
-
-
-CONCLU S IOhT.
-
-
-' O Conclude, oul' _r2mmer is so fully s_tisfy'd of the T_1'utI_
-of those Principles by _hich he is directed in reference to
-the Pu_Iic'h, that he will neither be Bawled, Threatned, La_ght,
-nor Drunh out of them; and instead of being co__ve_'ted b_ the
-Argun_ents of his Adversaries to their Opinions, he is very
-n_uch co_1_r___ed in his o_n by them; he professeth soIemnly
-th_t _ere it in his Po_er to chuse, he _w.,ouI_d rather have I_is
-A?__bition bounded b_ the Commands of a_. Great and Wise
-Maste_', than let _ it ra_nge__ wi.t_h a. Popular _L__icen_c_e t_h_ o' c_'o_n'd
-__ith success; yet he cannot commit such a Sin against the
-glo?'ious thing call'd Libe?'ty, no1_' Iet his SouI stoop so m_ch
-beIo_v it seIf, as to be content without repining to have his
-_R__ e_a__s.o_ n__w.h___o_ Il_y_subdu:d., or the P_'ivilege of Acting lih_e a sensi 0 e
-C_re__u_ torn from him by the impeI'ious Diċtates _oT_imiîe_
-AuthoI'ity, in __hat hand soeve1' it hag_ens t_o be Iac'd. What
-is t__e?'e ill this that is so Cri__inal, as to deserve the PenaIty of
-that most singuIar A_ophthe61n, _ T1'i_nme_' żs worse tkan a
-Re_eZ! What do angry men ail to rail so _gainst Moderation;
-_loth it not Iooh as if they _vel'e going to some very scurvy
-E_t1'eme, that is too strong to be digested by the more
-considering pa1't uf Manhin_! These Arbitrary Methods_,
-besides the inJ_u?__tic._e __o_f___the__m, are (God be thanhed) very
-u?1shilful _too, fo?' they fright the Birds, by taIki__g so Iuud,
-fro__ co_ning into the Nets that are Iaid for the_1_; and when
-Men ag?'ee to ri_e a House, they seIdon1 give _arlling, or bIow
-a T__llm_et; but there _re some small States-Men, _ho are so
-full ch_rg'd _ith their o_n Expectations, tbat they cannot
-contai?_. And hind Heaven by sending such a season_ble Curse
-upon their undertahings, hath n1ade their ignorance a?l Antidote
-agai?_st their MaIice; some of these cannot treat peaceabIy;
-yieIding _vill not satisfy them, they _vill have men by storm;
-there a_'e othe_'s, that must have PIots, to m_he their Service
-more necess_ry, and ha_e an Interest to heep them alive, sinc_e
-_'^ ''' - - - - - ' they
+CONCLUSION
+
+To Conclude, our Trimmer is so fully satisfy'd of the Truth
+of those Principles by which he is directed in reference to
+the Publick, that he will neither be Bawled, Threatned, Laught,
+nor Drunk out of them; and instead of being converted by the
+Arguments of his Adversaries to their Opinions, he is very
+much confirmed in his own by them; he professeth solemnly
+that were it in his Power to chuse, he would rather have his
+Ambition bounded by the Commands of a Great and Wise
+Master, than let it range with a Popular Licence, tho; crown'd
+with success; yet he cannot commit such a Sin against the
+glorious thing call'd Liberty, nor let his Soul stoop so much
+below it self, as to be content without repining to have his
+Reason wholly subdu'd, or the Privilege of Acting like a sensible
+Creature torn from him by the imperious Dictates of unlimited
+Authority, in what hand soever it happens to be plac'd. What
+is there in this that is so Criminal, as to deserve the Penalty of
+that most singular Apophthegm, A Trimmer is worse than a
+Rebel? What do angry men ail to rail so against Moderation;
+doth it not look as if they were going to some very scurvy
+Extreme, that is too strong to be digested by the more
+considering part of Mankind? These Arbitrary Methods,
+besides the injustice of them, are (God be thanked) very
+unskilful too, for they fright the Birds, by talking so loud,
+from coming into the Nets that are laid for them; and when
+Men agree to rifle a House, they seldom give warning, or blow
+a Trumpet; but there are some small States-Men, who are so
+full charg'd with their own Expectations, that they cannot
+contain. And kind Heaven by sending such a seasonable Curse
+upon their undertakings, hath made their ignorance an Antidote
+against their Malice; some of these cannot treat peaceably;
+yielding will not satisfy them, they will have men by storm;
+there are others, that must have Plots, to make their Service
+more necessary, and have an Interest to keep them alive, since
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@@ -1,45 +1,37 @@
-_______ _ __ ___ _ __ _ _ _ __ _ __ _ __ _ ____ _ ______ ___________ __________________ _
-
-
-
-
-o JF a _r immer. I o I
-
-they al'e to live u_on them; and persw__de the King to retrench__
-his _Tn Greatness,, so ag to shrinh jnto the head of _
-Pa_,ty, which is the betraying him into such an Unprince7y
-1__istahe, and to such _ _vilful diminution of himself, that they
-al'e the last E__emies he o_lght to allow himself to forgive; s_lch
-Men, if they could, _ould preTail with the Sun to shine only
-upon them a_d their Friends, and to le_v_ all the rest of the
-World in the d_l'h ; this is _ very unu&__al Monopol__, __d may
-come withi__ the Equity of the La_,. _hich _naheth it Tl'eason
-to Tmprison the King, when such un_ttin_ bounds a_'e put to his
-Favour, and he con6n'd to the l1arro_T limits of a particular set
-of Men, th_t would incl_se him; the&e Honest and o_ly Lo__al
-Gentlemen, if they may be allo_'d to beal. Wit_ess fur
-themselves, m_he a King their Engi_e, and degrade hi_n into a
-property. at the ve_y time t_at thei_. F_ lat_er_y w_uld mahe him
-believe the._____ai._d__.D_ .._iv, _i_n_ e__W._u___s_h_' _to.__hi_n.___.;_be_ides these the_'e is
-a Aying Squadron on both sides, that are af_.aid the Worl_
-should agree, sn_all dabblers in ConJuring, that raise angry
-Appa1'itions to heep Men f_'om being reconcil'd, lihe Wa_ps th_t
-_y up and do_n, bu_ and sting to heep Men unquiet; __t
-these Tnsects are comn_only sho_t-li_d Crea_ures, and no doubt
-in a little time Man_ind will be rid o_ them; they we_'e Gyants
-_t least who fought once again_t Heaven, but for such Pigmies
-as these to co__tend against it, is suc.h a provo_ine Fo7ly, th_t
-the insolent Bungler9 0ught to be laugI_t and hist out of the
-World for it; they __o_ld consider _ere i_ a Soul in that great
-body of the People, which n_ay for _ tin1e be drow2y a I_d
-unactive, but when the Leviathan i_ ruu_'d, it n_oveth lihe al_
-angry Crea_ture and _ilI neither be convinc'd _or resisted _ the
-People ca_1 never agree to shew their united Powers, till they
-are extreniély tém- pted and provo_ed to it, so that to apply
-Cupping-Glasses to a great Beast waturaIly .di_pos'd to sleep,
-_nd to fol'ce the Tame thing whether it w_l ol' no to he _aliant,
-must be learnt out of so_e other Boob than___a__cJVja_2l _ho
-would never have presc_'ib'd suc_ a pl'eposterous Method. _t is ;!,
-_ be remembred, that if Pl'inces have _aw and Authurity on
-their sides, the Peop7e on theirs may h_ve Yature, which is a
-_._.. -- - - ^ -- - - V' _ ' - ''^-__ _^'_formidable '_ '
+they are to live upon them; and perswade the King to retrench
+his own Greatness, so as to shrink into the head of a
+Party, which is the betraying him into such an Unprincely
+mistake, and to such a wilful diminution of himself, that they
+are the last Enemies he ought to allow himself to forgive; such
+Men, if they could, would prevail with the Sun to shine only
+upon them and their Friends, and to leave all the rest of the
+World in the dark; this is a very unusual Monopoly, and may
+come within the Equity of the Law, which maketh it Treason
+to Imprison the King, when such unfitting bounds are put to his
+Favour, and he confin'd to the narrow limits of a particular set
+of Men, that would inclose him; these Honest and only Loyal
+Gentlemen, if they may be allowed to bear Witness for
+themselves, make a King their Engine, and degrade him into a
+property at the very time that their Flattery would make him
+believe they paid Divine Worship to him; besides these there is
+a flying Squadron on both sides, that are afraid the World
+should agree, small dabblers in Conjuring, that raise angry
+Apparitions to keep Men from being reconciled, like Wasps that
+fly up and down, buz and sting to keep Men unquiet; but
+these Insects are commonly short-liv'd Creatures, and no doubt
+in a little time Mankind will be rid of them; they were Gyants
+at least who fought once against Heaven, but for such Pigmies
+as these to contend against it, is such a provoking Folly, that
+the insolent Bunglers ought to be laught and hist out of the
+World for it; they should consider there is a Soul in that great
+body of the People, which may for a time be drowzy and
+unactive, but when the Leviathan is rouz'd, it moveth like an
+angry Creature, and will neither be convinced nor resisted: the
+People can never agree to shew their united Powers, till they
+are extremely tempted and provoked to it, so that to apply
+Cupping-Glasses to a great Beast naturally dispos'd to sleep,
+and to force the Tame thing whether it will or no to be Valiant,
+must be learnt out of some other Book than Machiavil, who
+would never have prescrib'd such a preposterous Method. It is
+to be remembred, that if Princes have Law and Authority on
+their sides, the People on theirs may have Nature, which is a
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@@ -1,44 +1,40 @@
-/_____t _____ ____________________________________ __________M_____________ _p _ __ q _ _ _ _ _
+formidable Adversary; Duty, Justice, Religion, nay, even
+Humane Prudence too, biddeth the People suffer any thing
+rather than resist; but unconnected Nature, where e're it feels
+the smart will run to the nearest Remedy. Mens Passions in
+this Case are to be considered as well as their Duty, let it be
+never so strongly enforced, for if their Passions are provoked,
+they being as much a part of us as our Limbs, they lead Men
+into a short way of Arguing, that admitteth no distinction,
+and from the foundation of Self-Defence they will draw
+Inferences that will have miserable effects upon the quiet of a
+Government.
+Our Trimmer therefore dreads a general discontent, because
+he thinketh it differeth from a Rebellion, only as a Spotted
+Fever doth from the Plague, the same Species under a lower
+degree of Malignity; it worketh several ways; sometimes like
+a slow Poyson that hath its Effects at a great distance from the
+time it was given, sometimes like dry Flax prepared to catch at
+the first Fire, or like Seed in the ground ready to sprout upon
+the first Shower; in every shape 'tis fatal, and our Trimmer
+thinketh no pains or precaution can be so great as to prevent it.
+In short he thinketh himself in the right, grounding his
+Opinion upon that Truth, which equally hateth to be under the
+Oppressions of wrangling Sophistry of the one hand, or the
+short dictates of mistaken Authority on the other.
-Io2 T_e C/iaracte_'
-
-for Ini_ab.l.e___A_ _d_c_; D___t _ .MJus_t_i_c_e _Re_l_.i__o_n__ nay, even
-Humane P_'udence too, biddeth the People suffer any_ th..in. g
-_'áther tha_n__r_e_?_is_t_; b_t unco_l're_c_t_ed Nature,wh. e._'_e___e__r.e it f..eels
-th_e sn_art _vill run to the neares,t Re__1edy. Mens P_ssions in
-this Case are to be consider'd as _ell as their Duty, let it be
-never so stro__gIy enforc'd, for if their Passions a_'e pro_ok'd,
-they being as n_uch a part of lls as our Limbs, they lead Men
-!_into a short way of Arguing, that ad_nitteth no distinction,
-_;and from the fo__ndation of Self-Defence tI_ey will dr_v
-!Inferences that _vjll have nliserable effects u on the uiet of a
-. Government.
-_T Our Trj112_er thel'efore d_'eads a generwl discontent, because
-; he thinheth it differeth from a RebelIion, onIy as a S_otte_
-_eve_' doth fTo_n the Plague, the same Species under a lowe_'
-degree of Malignity; it _vorheth seveTal _Tays; so__etimes like
-a _lo_ Poyson that h_th its Effects at a great distance from the
-time it _Tas gi_'en, sometimes li_e _ry Flax p_'ep_red to catch at
-the _1'st Fire, ol_ like Seed in the g_'o_nd ready to sp_'out upon
-the _rst Sho_er; in every sha_e 'tiws _famt__anl, and ou_' Trj1nJner
-thinketh no p_ins or precaution can be so great _s t_ogr_e e '.
-In short b_ thin_eth himself in the right, grounding his
-Opi__ion upon that T_'uth, _Thich equally hateth to be under the
-Oppressions of _Trangling Sophistry of the one hand, or the
-short dictates of mistahen Authority on the other.
-Our Tr2_e1ner adoreth the Goddess Truth, tho' in all Ages she
-. _h_th been scurvily used, as we_ as those that Worshippe_ he_';
-ti_ of l_' te become such a ruining Vi_'tue, that Mankind seemeth
-to be agreed to co _nmend and avoid it; yet the want of PTactice
-which Nepealeth the othe_' Laws, hath no inAuence upon the
-La_T of Truth, because it I_ath root in Heaven, and an Tntri__lsich
-_alue in it self, that can never be imp_ired; she sheweth her
-Great__ess in this, that her Enemies even _hen they are
-successful are asham'd to own it ; nothing but powerful Truth
-hath the prerogative of Triumphing, not only after _ictories,
-b_t in spite of them, and to put Conquest her self out of
-Countenance; she may be hept under and _upprest, but her
-_ignity still remaineth with her, even when she is in Chains;
-Falshood
+Our Trimmer adoreth the Goddess Truth, tho' in all Ages she
+hath been scurvily used, as well as those that Worshipped her;
+'tis of late become such a ruining Virtue, that Mankind seemeth
+to be agreed to commend and avoid it; yet the want of Practice
+which Repealeth the other Laws, hath no influence upon the
+Law of Truth, because it hath root in Heaven, and an Intrinsick
+value in it self, that can never be impaired; she sheweth her
+Greatness in this, that her Enemies even when they are
+successful are asham'd to own it; nothing but powerful Truth
+hath the prerogative of Triumphing, not only after Victories,
+but in spite of them, and to put Conquest her self out of
+Countenance; she may be kept under and supprest, but her
+Dignity still remaineth with her, even when she is in Chains;
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@@ -1,38 +1,33 @@
-__p_ ___ __ __ _ _ _d__ _ _h___ _ ___Et____ __ __ __n_______________ ________ _ ____m_f____ L___T_____b______vv___ _wH_mt _h__ ____ _ _ _d___ _
+Falshood with all her Impudence hath not enough to speak ill
+of her before her Face, such Majesty she carrieth about
+her, that her most prosperous Enemies are fain to whisper their
+Treason; all the Power upon Earth can never extinguish her;
+she hath had in all Ages; and let the Mistaken Zeal of
+prevailing Authority christen any opposition to it with what
+Name they please, she maketh it not only an ugly and
+unmannerly, but a dangerous thing to persist; she hath lived
+very retired indeed, nay sometime so buried, that only some few
+of the discerning part of Mankind could have a Glimpse of her;
+with all that she hath Eternity in her, she knoweth not how to
+die, and from the darkest Clouds that shade and cover her, she
+breaketh from time to time with Triumph for her Friends, and
+Terrour to her Enemies.
+Our Trimmer therefore inspired by this Divine Virtue,
+thinketh fit to conclude with these Assertions, That our
+Climate is a Trimmer, between that part of the World where
+men are Roasted, and the other where they are Frozen j That
+our Church is a Trimmer between the Phrenzy of Platonick
+Visions, and the Lethargick Ignorance of Popish Dreams; That
+our Laws are Trimmers, between the Excess of unbounded
+Power, and the Extravagance of Liberty not enough restrained;
+That true Virtue hath ever been thought a Trimmer, and to
+have its dwelling in the middle between the two Extreams; That
+even God Almighty himself is divided between his two great
+Attributes, his Mercy and his Justice.
-
-
-o_ a Trimmer. To3
-
-F_lshood with all her lmpudence hath not enough to gpeak ill
-of hel' befol'e her Face, such MaJesty she ca_'rieth about
-her, that her most pTospe_'ous E__e Inies are fain to _hisper their
-Treason; all the Power u_on Earth can ne_er e_tinguish her;
-she hath liv'd in all Ages; and let the Mistahen _eal of
-__'evailing Authority christen a__y opposition to it with what
-Nan_e they ple4se, she maheth it not only a_ ugly and
-unmannerly, but _ dangerous thing to persist ; she hath lived
-ve_ retired indeed, nay sometime so b__'ied, that only some few
-of the disce_'ning part of Manhind could ha_e a Glimpse of her;
-_ith all that she h_th _ternity in hel', she hno_eth not ho_ to
-die, and from the d4r_est Clo__ds that shade and cove_' her, she
-breaheth from time to time _ith Triu_nph for her Friends, and _
-TeTTour to her Enemies.
-Our Tr2mmer therefore inspi_'ed by this Divine Virt_e,
-thin_eth 6t to concl_de _ith these Asse_'tions, That our
-Cli_ate is a Trżmmer, between that part of the Wol'ld _here
-men are _oasted, and the other _here they are Frozen; That
-o_r C_huTch is a T_mmeT,d0.__o,_ ___ _0Ve____Pla___ _
-_isions_ and t_e L. e.tha_ l'gi_h T,gno_ _r_a_n.c._e _of Po i_s_h_D?e__a__s; That
-ouT La_s are Tr2mmers, between the Exce_swof unbounded
-O_'er, an t e XtraVa_anCe O l _Tt__n__O_.t_e_n__O _ l'_eStl'ain_e_ j --
-Th_t tr_e _irtue hath e__v_ _be.e._n__.nth_no_ght_.,___._._ __2_n.z__er, and to
-_a_e its dwelling in the middle between the two E_treams; That
-e_en God Al_ighty himse_ lf is di.vided bėtwe.en_his two gr.e__t
-Attributes, his Mercy and his J_stice_
-In such Compan_, our T_'żmmer is not _sham'd of his Name,
-_nd willingly leaveth to the bold Champions of either Extream,
-the Hono_r of contending with no less Adve_'saries, than
-Nature, Religion, Liberty, Prudence, H_manity and Con1mon
-Sens_e .
+In such Company, our Trimmer is not ashamed of his Name,
+and willingly leaveth to the bold Champions of either Extream,
+the Honour of contending with no less Adversaries, than
+Nature, Religion, Liberty, Prudence, Humanity and Common
+Sense.
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