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#!/usr/bin/env python
# Unit tests for PostgreSQL on OS X and Linux.
from __future__ import print_function
import uuid
import unittest
from decimal import Decimal
from testutils import *
_TESTSTR = '0123456789-abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz-'
def _generate_test_string(length):
"""
Returns a string of composed of `seed` to make a string `length` characters long.
To enhance performance, there are 3 ways data is read, based on the length of the value, so
most data types are tested with 3 lengths. This function helps us generate the test data.
We use a recognizable data set instead of a single character to make it less likely that
"overlap" errors will be hidden and to help us manually identify where a break occurs.
"""
if length <= len(_TESTSTR):
return _TESTSTR[:length]
c = int((length + len(_TESTSTR) - 1) / len(_TESTSTR))
v = _TESTSTR * c
return v[:length]
class PGTestCase(unittest.TestCase):
INTEGERS = [ -1, 0, 1, 0x7FFFFFFF ]
BIGINTS = INTEGERS + [ 0xFFFFFFFF, 0x123456789 ]
SMALL_READ = 100
LARGE_READ = 4000
SMALL_STRING = _generate_test_string(SMALL_READ)
LARGE_STRING = _generate_test_string(LARGE_READ)
SMALL_BYTES = bytes(SMALL_STRING, 'utf-8')
LARGE_BYTES = bytes(LARGE_STRING, 'utf-8')
def __init__(self, connection_string, ansi, method_name):
unittest.TestCase.__init__(self, method_name)
self.connection_string = connection_string
self.ansi = ansi
def setUp(self):
self.cnxn = pyodbc.connect(self.connection_string, ansi=self.ansi)
self.cursor = self.cnxn.cursor()
# I've set my test database to use UTF-8 which seems most popular.
self.cnxn.setdecoding(pyodbc.SQL_WCHAR, encoding='utf-8')
self.cnxn.setencoding(encoding='utf-8')
# As of psql 9.5.04 SQLGetTypeInfo returns absurdly small sizes leading
# to slow writes. Override them:
self.cnxn.maxwrite = 1024 * 1024 * 1024
for i in range(3):
try:
self.cursor.execute("drop table t%d" % i)
self.cnxn.commit()
except:
pass
self.cnxn.rollback()
def tearDown(self):
try:
self.cursor.close()
self.cnxn.close()
except:
# If we've already closed the cursor or connection, exceptions are thrown.
pass
def _simpletest(datatype, value):
# A simple test that can be used for any data type where the Python
# type we write is also what we expect to receive.
def _t(self):
self.cursor.execute('create table t1(value %s)' % datatype)
self.cursor.execute('insert into t1 values (?)', value)
result = self.cursor.execute("select value from t1").fetchone()[0]
self.assertEqual(result, value)
return _t
def test_drivers(self):
p = pyodbc.drivers()
self.assert_(isinstance(p, list))
def test_datasources(self):
p = pyodbc.dataSources()
self.assert_(isinstance(p, dict))
# def test_gettypeinfo(self):
# self.cursor.getTypeInfo(pyodbc.SQL_VARCHAR)
# cols = [t[0] for t in self.cursor.description]
# print('cols:', cols)
# for row in self.cursor:
# for col,val in zip(cols, row):
# print(' ', col, val)
def test_getinfo_string(self):
value = self.cnxn.getinfo(pyodbc.SQL_CATALOG_NAME_SEPARATOR)
self.assert_(isinstance(value, str))
def test_getinfo_bool(self):
value = self.cnxn.getinfo(pyodbc.SQL_ACCESSIBLE_TABLES)
self.assert_(isinstance(value, bool))
def test_getinfo_int(self):
value = self.cnxn.getinfo(pyodbc.SQL_DEFAULT_TXN_ISOLATION)
self.assert_(isinstance(value, int))
def test_getinfo_smallint(self):
value = self.cnxn.getinfo(pyodbc.SQL_CONCAT_NULL_BEHAVIOR)
self.assert_(isinstance(value, int))
def test_negative_float(self):
value = -200
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(n float)")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values (?)", value)
result = self.cursor.execute("select n from t1").fetchone()[0]
self.assertEqual(value, result)
def _test_strtype(self, sqltype, value, colsize=None, resulttype=None):
"""
The implementation for string, Unicode, and binary tests.
"""
assert colsize is None or (value is None or colsize >= len(value))
if colsize:
sql = "create table t1(s %s(%s))" % (sqltype, colsize)
else:
sql = "create table t1(s %s)" % sqltype
self.cursor.execute(sql)
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(?)", value)
result = self.cursor.execute("select * from t1").fetchone()[0]
if resulttype and type(value) is not resulttype:
value = resulttype(value)
self.assertEqual(result, value)
def test_maxwrite(self):
# If we write more than `maxwrite` bytes, pyodbc will switch from
# binding the data all at once to providing it at execute time with
# SQLPutData. The default maxwrite is 1GB so this is rarely needed in
# PostgreSQL but I need to test the functionality somewhere.
self.cnxn.maxwrite = 300
self._test_strtype('varchar', _generate_test_string(400))
#
# VARCHAR
#
def test_empty_varchar(self):
self._test_strtype('varchar', '', self.SMALL_READ)
def test_null_varchar(self):
self._test_strtype('varchar', None, self.SMALL_READ)
def test_large_null_varchar(self):
# There should not be a difference, but why not find out?
self._test_strtype('varchar', None, self.LARGE_READ)
def test_small_varchar(self):
self._test_strtype('varchar', self.SMALL_STRING, self.SMALL_READ)
def test_large_varchar(self):
self._test_strtype('varchar', self.LARGE_STRING, self.LARGE_READ)
def test_varchar_many(self):
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(c1 varchar(300), c2 varchar(300), c3 varchar(300))")
v1 = 'ABCDEFGHIJ' * 30
v2 = '0123456789' * 30
v3 = '9876543210' * 30
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1(c1, c2, c3) values (?,?,?)", v1, v2, v3);
row = self.cursor.execute("select c1, c2, c3 from t1").fetchone()
self.assertEqual(v1, row.c1)
self.assertEqual(v2, row.c2)
self.assertEqual(v3, row.c3)
def test_chinese(self):
v = '我的'
self.cursor.execute("SELECT N'我的' AS name")
row = self.cursor.fetchone()
self.assertEqual(row[0], v)
self.cursor.execute("SELECT N'我的' AS name")
rows = self.cursor.fetchall()
self.assertEqual(rows[0][0], v)
#
# bytea
#
def test_null_bytea(self):
self._test_strtype('bytea', None)
def test_small_bytea(self):
self._test_strtype('bytea', self.SMALL_BYTES)
def test_large_bytea(self):
self._test_strtype('bytea', self.LARGE_BYTES)
# Now test with bytearray
def test_large_bytea_array(self):
self._test_strtype('bytea', bytearray(self.LARGE_BYTES), resulttype=bytes)
for value in INTEGERS:
name = str(value).replace('.', '_').replace('-', 'neg_')
locals()['test_int_%s' % name] = _simpletest('int', value)
for value in BIGINTS:
name = str(value).replace('.', '_').replace('-', 'neg_')
locals()['test_bigint_%s' % name] = _simpletest('bigint', value)
for value in [-1234.56, -1, 0, 1, 1234.56, 123456789.21]:
name = str(value).replace('.', '_').replace('-', 'neg_')
locals()['test_money_%s' % name] = _simpletest('money', value)
for value in "-1234.56 -1 0 1 1234.56 123456789.21".split():
name = value.replace('.', '_').replace('-', 'neg_')
locals()['test_decimal_%s' % name] = _simpletest('decimal(20,6)', Decimal(value))
for value in "-1234.56 -1 0 1 1234.56 123456789.21".split():
name = value.replace('.', '_').replace('-', 'neg_')
locals()['test_numeric_%s' % name] = _simpletest('numeric(20,6)', Decimal(value))
def test_small_decimal(self):
value = Decimal('100010') # (I use this because the ODBC docs tell us how the bytes should look in the C struct)
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(d numeric(19))")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(?)", value)
v = self.cursor.execute("select * from t1").fetchone()[0]
self.assertEqual(type(v), Decimal)
self.assertEqual(v, value)
def test_small_decimal_scale(self):
# The same as small_decimal, except with a different scale. This value exactly matches the ODBC documentation
# example in the C Data Types appendix.
value = '1000.10'
value = Decimal(value)
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(d numeric(20,6))")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(?)", value)
v = self.cursor.execute("select * from t1").fetchone()[0]
self.assertEqual(type(v), Decimal)
self.assertEqual(v, value)
def test_negative_decimal_scale(self):
value = Decimal('-10.0010')
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(d numeric(19,4))")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(?)", value)
v = self.cursor.execute("select * from t1").fetchone()[0]
self.assertEqual(type(v), Decimal)
self.assertEqual(v, value)
def test_nonnative_uuid(self):
# The default is False meaning we should return a string. Note that
# SQL Server seems to always return uppercase.
value = uuid.uuid4()
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(n uuid)")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values (?)", value)
pyodbc.native_uuid = False
result = self.cursor.execute("select n from t1").fetchval()
self.assertEqual(type(result), str)
self.assertEqual(result, str(value).upper())
def test_native_uuid(self):
# When true, we should return a uuid.UUID object.
value = uuid.uuid4()
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(n uuid)")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values (?)", value)
pyodbc.native_uuid = True
result = self.cursor.execute("select n from t1").fetchval()
self.assertIsInstance(result, uuid.UUID)
self.assertEqual(value, result)
def _exec(self):
self.cursor.execute(self.sql)
def test_close_cnxn(self):
"""Make sure using a Cursor after closing its connection doesn't crash."""
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(id integer, s varchar(20))")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values (?,?)", 1, 'test')
self.cursor.execute("select * from t1")
self.cnxn.close()
# Now that the connection is closed, we expect an exception. (If the code attempts to use
# the HSTMT, we'll get an access violation instead.)
self.sql = "select * from t1"
self.assertRaises(pyodbc.ProgrammingError, self._exec)
def test_empty_string(self):
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(s varchar(20))")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(?)", "")
def test_fixed_str(self):
value = "testing"
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(s char(7))")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(?)", "testing")
v = self.cursor.execute("select * from t1").fetchone()[0]
self.assertEqual(type(v), str)
self.assertEqual(len(v), len(value)) # If we alloc'd wrong, the test below might work because of an embedded NULL
self.assertEqual(v, value)
def test_fetchval(self):
expected = "test"
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(s varchar(20))")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(?)", expected)
result = self.cursor.execute("select * from t1").fetchval()
self.assertEqual(result, expected)
def test_negative_row_index(self):
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(s varchar(20))")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(?)", "1")
row = self.cursor.execute("select * from t1").fetchone()
self.assertEquals(row[0], "1")
self.assertEquals(row[-1], "1")
def test_version(self):
self.assertEquals(3, len(pyodbc.version.split('.'))) # 1.3.1 etc.
def test_rowcount_delete(self):
self.assertEquals(self.cursor.rowcount, -1)
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(i int)")
count = 4
for i in range(count):
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values (?)", i)
self.cursor.execute("delete from t1")
self.assertEquals(self.cursor.rowcount, count)
def test_rowcount_nodata(self):
"""
This represents a different code path than a delete that deleted something.
The return value is SQL_NO_DATA and code after it was causing an error. We could use SQL_NO_DATA to step over
the code that errors out and drop down to the same SQLRowCount code. On the other hand, we could hardcode a
zero return value.
"""
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(i int)")
# This is a different code path internally.
self.cursor.execute("delete from t1")
self.assertEquals(self.cursor.rowcount, 0)
def test_rowcount_select(self):
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(i int)")
count = 4
for i in range(count):
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values (?)", i)
self.cursor.execute("select * from t1")
self.assertEquals(self.cursor.rowcount, 4)
# PostgreSQL driver fails here?
# def test_rowcount_reset(self):
# "Ensure rowcount is reset to -1"
#
# self.cursor.execute("create table t1(i int)")
# count = 4
# for i in range(count):
# self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values (?)", i)
# self.assertEquals(self.cursor.rowcount, 1)
#
# self.cursor.execute("create table t2(i int)")
# self.assertEquals(self.cursor.rowcount, -1)
def test_lower_case(self):
"Ensure pyodbc.lowercase forces returned column names to lowercase."
# Has to be set before creating the cursor, so we must recreate self.cursor.
pyodbc.lowercase = True
self.cursor = self.cnxn.cursor()
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(Abc int, dEf int)")
self.cursor.execute("select * from t1")
names = [ t[0] for t in self.cursor.description ]
names.sort()
self.assertEquals(names, [ "abc", "def" ])
# Put it back so other tests don't fail.
pyodbc.lowercase = False
def test_row_description(self):
"""
Ensure Cursor.description is accessible as Row.cursor_description.
"""
self.cursor = self.cnxn.cursor()
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(a int, b char(3))")
self.cnxn.commit()
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(1, 'abc')")
row = self.cursor.execute("select * from t1").fetchone()
self.assertEquals(self.cursor.description, row.cursor_description)
def test_executemany(self):
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(a int, b varchar(10))")
params = [ (i, str(i)) for i in range(1, 6) ]
self.cursor.executemany("insert into t1(a, b) values (?,?)", params)
# REVIEW: Without the cast, we get the following error:
# [07006] [unixODBC]Received an unsupported type from Postgres.;\nERROR: table "t2" does not exist (14)
count = self.cursor.execute("select cast(count(*) as int) from t1").fetchone()[0]
self.assertEqual(count, len(params))
self.cursor.execute("select a, b from t1 order by a")
rows = self.cursor.fetchall()
self.assertEqual(count, len(rows))
for param, row in zip(params, rows):
self.assertEqual(param[0], row[0])
self.assertEqual(param[1], row[1])
def test_executemany_failure(self):
"""
Ensure that an exception is raised if one query in an executemany fails.
"""
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(a int, b varchar(10))")
params = [ (1, 'good'),
('error', 'not an int'),
(3, 'good') ]
self.failUnlessRaises(pyodbc.Error, self.cursor.executemany, "insert into t1(a, b) value (?, ?)", params)
def test_row_slicing(self):
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(a int, b int, c int, d int)");
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(1,2,3,4)")
row = self.cursor.execute("select * from t1").fetchone()
result = row[:]
self.failUnless(result is row)
result = row[:-1]
self.assertEqual(result, (1,2,3))
result = row[0:4]
self.failUnless(result is row)
def test_cnxn_execute_error(self):
"""
Make sure that Connection.execute (not Cursor) errors are not "eaten".
GitHub issue #74
"""
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(a int primary key)")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values (1)")
self.failUnlessRaises(pyodbc.Error, self.cnxn.execute, "insert into t1 values (1)")
def test_row_repr(self):
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(a int, b int, c int, d int)");
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values(1,2,3,4)")
row = self.cursor.execute("select * from t1").fetchone()
result = str(row)
self.assertEqual(result, "(1, 2, 3, 4)")
result = str(row[:-1])
self.assertEqual(result, "(1, 2, 3)")
result = str(row[:1])
self.assertEqual(result, "(1,)")
def test_autocommit(self):
self.assertEqual(self.cnxn.autocommit, False)
othercnxn = pyodbc.connect(self.connection_string, autocommit=True)
self.assertEqual(othercnxn.autocommit, True)
othercnxn.autocommit = False
self.assertEqual(othercnxn.autocommit, False)
def test_exc_integrity(self):
"Make sure an IntegretyError is raised"
# This is really making sure we are properly encoding and comparing the SQLSTATEs.
self.cursor.execute("create table t1(s1 varchar(10) primary key)")
self.cursor.execute("insert into t1 values ('one')")
self.failUnlessRaises(pyodbc.IntegrityError, self.cursor.execute, "insert into t1 values ('one')")
def test_cnxn_set_attr_before(self):
# I don't have a getattr right now since I don't have a table telling me what kind of
# value to expect. For now just make sure it doesn't crash.
# From the unixODBC sqlext.h header file.
SQL_ATTR_PACKET_SIZE = 112
othercnxn = pyodbc.connect(self.connection_string, attrs_before={ SQL_ATTR_PACKET_SIZE : 1024 * 32 })
def test_cnxn_set_attr(self):
# I don't have a getattr right now since I don't have a table telling me what kind of
# value to expect. For now just make sure it doesn't crash.
# From the unixODBC sqlext.h header file.
SQL_ATTR_ACCESS_MODE = 101
SQL_MODE_READ_ONLY = 1
self.cnxn.set_attr(SQL_ATTR_ACCESS_MODE, SQL_MODE_READ_ONLY)
def main():
from optparse import OptionParser
parser = OptionParser(usage="usage: %prog [options] connection_string")
parser.add_option("-v", "--verbose", default=0, action="count", help="Increment test verbosity (can be used multiple times)")
parser.add_option("-d", "--debug", action="store_true", default=False, help="Print debugging items")
parser.add_option("-t", "--test", help="Run only the named test")
parser.add_option('-a', '--ansi', help='ANSI only', default=False, action='store_true')
(options, args) = parser.parse_args()
if len(args) > 1:
parser.error('Only one argument is allowed. Do you need quotes around the connection string?')
if not args:
connection_string = load_setup_connection_string('pgtests')
if not connection_string:
parser.print_help()
raise SystemExit()
else:
connection_string = args[0]
if options.verbose:
cnxn = pyodbc.connect(connection_string, ansi=options.ansi)
print_library_info(cnxn)
cnxn.close()
if options.test:
# Run a single test
if not options.test.startswith('test_'):
options.test = 'test_%s' % (options.test)
s = unittest.TestSuite([ PGTestCase(connection_string, options.ansi, options.test) ])
else:
# Run all tests in the class
methods = [ m for m in dir(PGTestCase) if m.startswith('test_') ]
methods.sort()
s = unittest.TestSuite([ PGTestCase(connection_string, options.ansi, m) for m in methods ])
testRunner = unittest.TextTestRunner(verbosity=options.verbose)
result = testRunner.run(s)
if __name__ == '__main__':
# Add the build directory to the path so we're testing the latest build, not the installed version.
add_to_path()
import pyodbc
main()