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Changes to the handling of example assessments; something on Rubrics.

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commit c257097c36cfcff11d9efc2b6a73c46c8fb6cacd 1 parent 0ae2c35
rkingdon authored
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13 lang/en/help/workshop/elements.html
@@ -47,10 +47,19 @@
overall "error count" is a weighted sum of the missing items. The assessor
can always make a minor adjustment to these suggested grades.
-<P><B>Criteria Grading.</B> The elements will give a set of &quot;level&quot; statements
+<P><B>Criterion Grading.</B> The elements will give a set of &quot;level&quot; statements
which can be used to rank the assignment. The statements may be cumulative or they may
each be self contained. The assessor must decide which statement best fits each piece of
work. The teacher must also relate each criterion statement with a suggested grade. These
should normally be in order. The assessor can make a minor adjustment to these
-suggested grades.
+suggested grades.</P>
+
+<P><B>Rubric Grading.</B> This is similar to Criterion Grading but there is more than
+one criteria. The number of criteria is given in the assignment parameters. Within each
+criterion there can be up to five &quot;level&quot; statements. In a given assignment
+the number of levels can vary from criterion to criterion. When setting up a criterion a
+blank level statement signals the end of the level statements. Thus some criteria may have
+two levels, others have three, up to five levels. The criteria can be weighted. The levels
+are scored 0, 1, 2, up to 4. The grade for the assessment is a weighted sum of these
+scores.
</P>
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14 lang/en/help/workshop/gradingassessments.html
@@ -7,14 +7,18 @@
before the assignment started. For example, at a higher level the students may be
required to give critical comments, at an intermediate level the students may be
required to point out strengths and weaknesses, and at a lower level the students
- may be simply pointing out errors and inaccuracies.
+ may be simply pointing out errors and inaccuracies.</P>
<P>If available the Teacher's own assessment is shown before that of the
student so an easy comparison can be made. The teacher's own
- comments can act as a kind of benchmark.
+ comments can act as a kind of benchmark.</P>
-<P>The grades of assessment is
+<P>The grade for the assessment is
saved by clicking on the apprpriate button at the foot of the page. There is a
chance to repeat the grading within the &quot;editing&quot; period. Once that
- time has elapsed the grade is made available to the student.
-</P>
+ time has elapsed the teacher's comment is made available to the student. The
+ &quot;grading grade&quot;, however, is not revealed to the student until the
+ final grades are made available. (The reason for this is the likely confusion
+ between the grade for the peice of work and the grade for the ASSESSMENT
+ of that work, at an early stage of an assignment the distinction will not be
+ clear to students.)</P>
View
62 lang/en/help/workshop/managing.html
@@ -13,36 +13,39 @@
small number of example pieces of work. These are practice pieces for the
students to assess before preparing their own pieces of work. However,
before the assignment is made available to students, these example
- pieces should be assessed by the teacher. This provides the students
- with not only examples for the assignment but also specimen assessments
- on those examples.
+ pieces should be assessed by the teacher. This provides the teacher
+ with specimen &quot;answers&quot; when reviewing the students' assessments
+ of those examples (produced in the next phase).
<P>The submission of example pieces of work by the teacher is optional
- and for certain assignments may not be appropriate.
+ and for certain assignments may not be appropriate.</P>
<LI>The assignment is now opened to the students. If the teacher has set up
- example pieces of work the students can be asked to assess a number of these.
- In this case, the teacher must grade these assessments and the students must
- reach a satisfactory standard before they are allowed submit their own work.
- Here, a &quot;satisfactory standard&quot; has been set at 40%. Once a student
- has &quot;passed&quot; the required number of assessments they are free to
- submit their own work.
- <P>When a student submits a piece of work the teacher can, if desired assess that
- work. This assessment can be incorporated into the student final grade. These
- assessments, if they are required, can take place either during the submission
- phase of the assignment or after the submission deadline.
+ example pieces of work the students are required to assess a specified number
+ of these. (The number of assessments was given when the assignment was
+ created.) Once a student has made the required number of assessments
+ they can then submit their own work. In the case of an assignment with no
+ examples, the students are free to submit their own work without any delay.
+ <P>When a student submits a piece of work the teacher can, if desired, assess that
+ work. This assessment can be incorporated into the student's final grade. These
+ assessments can take place either during the submission phase of the
+ assignment or after the submission deadline.</P>
<P>If the assignment incorporates peer assessment, students who have submitted
work are shown other students' work to assess. When they have made an assessment
- their peer can see that assessment (but the other student cannot comment on it.)
- The teacher, however, can, if desired, grade the assessment and that score is taken
- forward towards the student's final grade.
+ their peer can see that assessment. The student who submitted the work can
+ comment on the assessment if that option was chosen for this assignment.
+ The teacher can, if desired, grade these peer assessments and
+ these scores can be taken forward towards the students' final grades (but that
+ is not really necessary in many cases, see the next phase).</P>
<LI>After the deadline has passed, the teacher moves the assignment to the next phase
where further submissions and assessments by students are not allowed. The teacher
- can, if wished, grade the peer assessments made by the students. This is not really
- necessary as provided a reason number of assessments have been made on each
- submission the &quot;grading performance&quot; of each student can be
- determined from the relative scores. The teacher now calculates the final grades
- of the students. These final grades are normally made up of three components,
+ can, if wished, complete the grading of assessments made on the examples and the
+ grading of the student submissions. They can also grade the peer assessments made
+ by the students. This is NOT really necessary as, provided a reason number of
+ assessments have been made on each submission, the &quot;grading
+ performance&quot; of each student can be determined from the relative scores.
+ <P>When the grading has been completed, the teacher calculates the final grades
+ of the students. These final grades are normally made up of three components,
teacher's grade of the student's work, mean peer grade of the student's work
and the student's grading performance. The last can include the mean &quot;grading
grade&quot; entered by the teacher against a student's comments. These three
@@ -50,9 +53,20 @@
grades takes place.
<LI>The final phase of the assignment is entered to allow the students to see their
- final grades. The teacher can, be desired, backtrack the assignment to allow some
+ final grades. The teacher can, if desired, backtrack the assignment to allow some
adjustment of, say, the weights used in the final grade calculation, the revised
grades can then be shown to the students.
+ <P>The students (and the teacher) are also shown a &quot;League Table&quot;
+ of the student submissions. These are listed in order of grade, the top submission
+ is first. Here the grade given to the submission is a combination of the teacher's
+ grade and the average of the peer grades (if they are available). The weighting
+ used is that given during the previous phase.</P>
</OL>
-
+<P>At any phase of the assignment the teacher can open the &quot;Administration&quot;
+page. This shows the current state of the assignment. It lists the Teacher's example
+submissions (if any), the students' assessments (of the teacher's examples, their own
+work, and of other students' submissions), and the submissions of the students.
+The teacher can use this page to assess and re-assess submissions, grade and
+re-grade assessments, delete submissions and assessments, and generally watch
+the progress of the assignment.</P>
</P>
View
14 lang/en/help/workshop/nassessmentsofteachersexamples.html
@@ -1,10 +1,12 @@
<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Number of Assessments of Teacher's Examples</B></P>
<P>This number determines whether the students are asked to assess
- any example peices of work before submitting their own work. If it is
- not zero then each student must assess that number of example pieces
- of work to a satisfactory level. This means that the teacher must grade
- these assessments before the student can submit work. The student is
- shown the teacher's comments and grade for each of their
- assessments.
+ any example pieces of work before submitting their own work. If it is
+ non-zero then each student must assess that number of example pieces
+ of work. They cannot submit their own work until these assessments
+ have been made. The teacher can, if wished, grade these assessments
+ and use those grades in the students' final grade. Any comments from
+ the teacher on these assessments are made available to the student but
+ the teacher's &quot;grading grades&quot; are not shown to the student
+ until after the deadline for submissions has passed.
</P>
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