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commit cb8760381065965cb842a7570e856b145d0481bb 1 parent 41f2f34
authored October 28, 2002
12  lang/de/help/coursecategory.html
... ...
@@ -1,3 +1,11 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER> <B>Kurs-Rubriken</B> </P>
2  
-<P> Ihr <SPAN ID=UNKNOWNWORD><FONT COLOR="#ff00ff">sel@ction</FONT></SPAN> Der Verwalter kann mehrere Kurs-Rubriken angelegt haben.<P> Zum Beispiel, "Wissenschaft", "Geisteswissenschaften", "Gesundheitswesen" etc.<P> Die passende für Ihren Kurs wählen. Diese Auswahl bestimmt, wo Ihr Kurs auf der aufgelistet wird und es erleichtert den Teilnehmern, den richtigen Kurrs zu finden.
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course Categories</B></P>
3 2
 
  3
+<P>Your Moodle administrator may have set up several 
  4
+   course categories.
  5
+
  6
+<P>For example, "Science", "Humanities", "Public Health" etc
  7
+
  8
+<P>Choose the one most applicable for your course.  This 
  9
+   choice will affect where your course is displayed on the 
  10
+   course listing and may make it easier for students to 
  11
+   find your course.
48  lang/de/help/courseformats.html
... ...
@@ -1,24 +1,24 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Moodle course formats</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P><B>Weekly format</B></P>
4  
-<UL>
5  
-The course is organised week by week, with a clear start date and a finish date.
6  
-Each week consists of activities.  Some of them, like journals, may have 
7  
-"open windows" of, say, two weeks after which they become unavailable.
8  
-</UL>
9  
-
10  
-<P><B>Topics format</B></P>
11  
-<UL>
12  
-Very similar to the weekly format, except that each "week" is called a topic.
13  
-A "topic" is not restricted to any time limit.  You don't need to specify any
14  
-dates.
15  
-</UL>
16  
-
17  
-<P><B>Social format</B></P>
18  
-<UL>
19  
-This format is oriented around one main forum, the Social forum, which appears
20  
-listed on the main page.  It is useful for situations that are more freeform.
21  
-They may not even be courses.  For example, it could be used as a departmental
22  
-notice board.
23  
-</UL>
24  
-
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Moodle course formats</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P><B>Weekly format</B></P>
  4
+<UL>
  5
+The course is organised week by week, with a clear start date and a finish date.
  6
+Each week consists of activities.  Some of them, like journals, may have 
  7
+"open windows" of, say, two weeks after which they become unavailable.
  8
+</UL>
  9
+
  10
+<P><B>Topics format</B></P>
  11
+<UL>
  12
+Very similar to the weekly format, except that each "week" is called a topic.
  13
+A "topic" is not restricted to any time limit.  You don't need to specify any
  14
+dates.
  15
+</UL>
  16
+
  17
+<P><B>Social format</B></P>
  18
+<UL>
  19
+This format is oriented around one main forum, the Social forum, which appears
  20
+listed on the main page.  It is useful for situations that are more freeform.
  21
+They may not even be courses.  For example, it could be used as a departmental
  22
+notice board.
  23
+</UL>
  24
+
8  lang/de/help/coursefullname.html
... ...
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course Full name</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>The full name of the course is displayed at the top of the screen and in the course listings.</P>
4  
-
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course Full name</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>The full name of the course is displayed at the top of the screen and in the course listings.</P>
  4
+
30  lang/de/help/coursenewsitems.html
... ...
@@ -1,15 +1,15 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course News Items</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>A special forum called "News" appears in the 
4  
-   "weekly" and "topics" course formats.  It's 
5  
-   a good place to post notices for all students
6  
-   to see.  (By default, all students are subscribed
7  
-   to this forum, and will receive your notices by
8  
-   email.)
9  
-
10  
-<P>This setting determines how many recent items 
11  
-   appear on your course home page, in a news box 
12  
-   down the right-hand side.
13  
-
14  
-<P>If you set it to "0 news items" then the news 
15  
-   box won't even appear.
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course News Items</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>A special forum called "News" appears in the 
  4
+   "weekly" and "topics" course formats.  It's 
  5
+   a good place to post notices for all students
  6
+   to see.  (By default, all students are subscribed
  7
+   to this forum, and will receive your notices by
  8
+   email.)
  9
+
  10
+<P>This setting determines how many recent items 
  11
+   appear on your course home page, in a news box 
  12
+   down the right-hand side.
  13
+
  14
+<P>If you set it to "0 news items" then the news 
  15
+   box won't even appear.
28  lang/de/help/coursenumsections.html
... ...
@@ -1,14 +1,14 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course Number of Weeks/Topics</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>This setting is only used by the 'weekly' and 'topics'
4  
-   course formats.
5  
-
6  
-<P>In the 'weekly' format, it specifies the number of weeks 
7  
-   that the course will run for, starting from the 
8  
-   course starting date.
9  
-
10  
-<P>In the 'topics' format, it specifies the number of topics
11  
-   in the course.
12  
-
13  
-<P>Both of these translate to the number of "boxes" down the 
14  
-   middle of the course page.
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course Number of Weeks/Topics</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>This setting is only used by the 'weekly' and 'topics'
  4
+   course formats.
  5
+
  6
+<P>In the 'weekly' format, it specifies the number of weeks 
  7
+   that the course will run for, starting from the 
  8
+   course starting date.
  9
+
  10
+<P>In the 'topics' format, it specifies the number of topics
  11
+   in the course.
  12
+
  13
+<P>Both of these translate to the number of "boxes" down the 
  14
+   middle of the course page.
14  lang/de/help/courseshortname.html
... ...
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course short name</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>Many institutions have a shorthand way of referring to a course, such as 
4  
-   BP102 or COMMS.  Even you don't already have such a name for your course, 
5  
-   make one up here.  It will be used in several places where the long name 
6  
-   isn't appropriate (such us in the subject line of email).</P>
7  
-
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course short name</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>Many institutions have a shorthand way of referring to a course, such as 
  4
+   BP102 or COMMS.  Even you don't already have such a name for your course, 
  5
+   make one up here.  It will be used in several places where the long name 
  6
+   isn't appropriate (such us in the subject line of email).</P>
  7
+
38  lang/de/help/coursestartdate.html
... ...
@@ -1,19 +1,19 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course Start Date</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>This is where you specify the starting time of the 
4  
-   course (in your own timezone).
5  
-
6  
-<P>If you are using a 'weekly' course format, this will 
7  
-   affect the display of the weeks.  The first week will
8  
-   start on the date you set here.
9  
- 
10  
-<P>This setting will not affect courses using the 
11  
-   'social' or 'topics' formats.
12  
-
13  
-<P>However, one place this setting will be affect is 
14  
-   the display of logs, which use this date as the earliest
15  
-   possible date you can display.
16  
- 
17  
-<P>In general, if your course does have a real starting date
18  
-   then it makes sense to set this date to that, no matter 
19  
-   what course formats you are using.
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course Start Date</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>This is where you specify the starting time of the 
  4
+   course (in your own timezone).
  5
+
  6
+<P>If you are using a 'weekly' course format, this will 
  7
+   affect the display of the weeks.  The first week will
  8
+   start on the date you set here.
  9
+ 
  10
+<P>This setting will not affect courses using the 
  11
+   'social' or 'topics' formats.
  12
+
  13
+<P>However, one place this setting will be affect is 
  14
+   the display of logs, which use this date as the earliest
  15
+   possible date you can display.
  16
+ 
  17
+<P>In general, if your course does have a real starting date
  18
+   then it makes sense to set this date to that, no matter 
  19
+   what course formats you are using.
46  lang/de/help/enrolmentkey.html
... ...
@@ -1,23 +1,23 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course Enrolment Key</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>A course enrolment key is what keeps unwanted people 
4  
-   out of your course.
5  
-
6  
-<P>If you leave this blank, then anyone who has created 
7  
-   a Moodle username on this site will be able to enrol
8  
-   in your course simply by going in to it.
9  
-
10  
-<P>If you put something here, then students who are trying 
11  
-   to get in for the FIRST TIME ONLY will be asked to supply 
12  
-   this word or phrase.
13  
-
14  
-<P>The idea is that you will supply the key to authorised 
15  
-   people using another means like private email, snail mail,
16  
-   on the phone or even verbally in a face to face class.
17  
-
18  
-<P>If this password "gets out" and you have unwanted people 
19  
-   enrolling, you can unenrol them (see their user profile page)
20  
-   and change this key.  Any legitimate students who have already 
21  
-   enrolled will not be affected, but the unwanted people won't be 
22  
-   able to get back in.
23  
-
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Course Enrolment Key</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>A course enrolment key is what keeps unwanted people 
  4
+   out of your course.
  5
+
  6
+<P>If you leave this blank, then anyone who has created 
  7
+   a Moodle username on this site will be able to enrol
  8
+   in your course simply by going in to it.
  9
+
  10
+<P>If you put something here, then students who are trying 
  11
+   to get in for the FIRST TIME ONLY will be asked to supply 
  12
+   this word or phrase.
  13
+
  14
+<P>The idea is that you will supply the key to authorised 
  15
+   people using another means like private email, snail mail,
  16
+   on the phone or even verbally in a face to face class.
  17
+
  18
+<P>If this password "gets out" and you have unwanted people 
  19
+   enrolling, you can unenrol them (see their user profile page)
  20
+   and change this key.  Any legitimate students who have already 
  21
+   enrolled will not be affected, but the unwanted people won't be 
  22
+   able to get back in.
  23
+
42  lang/de/help/guestaccess.html
... ...
@@ -1,21 +1,21 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Guest Access</B></P>

2  
-

3  
-<P>You have the choice of allowing "guests" into your course.

4  
-

5  
-<P>People can log in as guests using the "Login as a guest" button

6  
-   on the login screen.

7  
-

8  
-<P>Guests ALWAYS have "read-only" access - meaning they can't leave 

9  
-   any posts or otherwise mess up the course for real students.

10  
-

11  
-<P>This can be handy when you want to let a colleague in to 

12  
-   look around at your work, or to let students see a course before 

13  
-   they have decided to enrol.

14  
-

15  
-<P>Note that you have a choice between two types of guest access:

16  
-   with the enrolment key or without.  If you choose to allow 

17  
-   guests who have the key, then the guest will need to provide 

18  
-   the current enrolment key EVERY TIME they log in (unlike 

19  
-   students who only need to do it once).  This lets you restrict 

20  
-   your guests.  If you choose to allow guests without a key, then 

21  
-   anyone can get straight into your course.

  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Guest Access</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>You have the choice of allowing "guests" into your course.
  4
+
  5
+<P>People can log in as guests using the "Login as a guest" button
  6
+   on the login screen.
  7
+
  8
+<P>Guests ALWAYS have "read-only" access - meaning they can't leave 
  9
+   any posts or otherwise mess up the course for real students.
  10
+
  11
+<P>This can be handy when you want to let a colleague in to 
  12
+   look around at your work, or to let students see a course before 
  13
+   they have decided to enrol.
  14
+
  15
+<P>Note that you have a choice between two types of guest access:
  16
+   with the enrolment key or without.  If you choose to allow 
  17
+   guests who have the key, then the guest will need to provide 
  18
+   the current enrolment key EVERY TIME they log in (unlike 
  19
+   students who only need to do it once).  This lets you restrict 
  20
+   your guests.  If you choose to allow guests without a key, then 
  21
+   anyone can get straight into your course.
26  lang/de/help/html.html
... ...
@@ -1,13 +1,13 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Help on writing html</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>When writing HTML in Moodle, you are free to use any HTML tags you like
4  
-   to produce the effect you want.
5  
-
6  
-<P>Your code will normally be printed on the page within a table cell, 
7  
-   so:
8  
-
9  
-   <UL>
10  
-   <LI>there is no need to use any &lt;HEAD> or &lt;BODY> tags
11  
-   <LI>be careful about unmatched &lt;/TABLE> tags that may mess up the display.
12  
-   </UL>
13  
-
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Help on writing html</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>When writing HTML in Moodle, you are free to use any HTML tags you like
  4
+   to produce the effect you want.
  5
+
  6
+<P>Your code will normally be printed on the page within a table cell, 
  7
+   so:
  8
+
  9
+   <UL>
  10
+   <LI>there is no need to use any &lt;HEAD> or &lt;BODY> tags
  11
+   <LI>be careful about unmatched &lt;/TABLE> tags that may mess up the display.
  12
+   </UL>
  13
+
24  lang/de/help/langedit.html
... ...
@@ -1,12 +1,12 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Language Editing</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>To edit languages on this page the files need to be writable 
4  
-   by the web server process.
5  
-
6  
-<P>Within some of the strings you will notice <B>$a</B> and <B>$a->something</B>.
7  
-
8  
-<P>These represent variables that will be replaced by names or other words from 
9  
-   within Moodle.  
10  
-
11  
-<P>When there is only one variable, the $a form is used.  When there are two or 
12  
-   more variables, then each one has a name.
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Language Editing</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>To edit languages on this page the files need to be writable 
  4
+   by the web server process.
  5
+
  6
+<P>Within some of the strings you will notice <B>$a</B> and <B>$a->something</B>.
  7
+
  8
+<P>These represent variables that will be replaced by names or other words from 
  9
+   within Moodle.  
  10
+
  11
+<P>When there is only one variable, the $a form is used.  When there are two or 
  12
+   more variables, then each one has a name.
36  lang/de/help/picture.html
... ...
@@ -1,18 +1,18 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Uploading a picture</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>You can upload a picture from your computer to this server, and this picture will be used in various places to represent you.
4  
-<P>For this reason, the best images to use are a close-up of your face, but you can use any image you like.
5  
-<P>The picture must be in JPG or PNG format (ie the names will usually end in .jpg or .png).
6  
-<P>You can get a picture file using one of four methods:
7  
-
8  
-<OL>
9  
-<LI>Using a digital camera, your photos will most likely already be on your computer in the right format.
10  
-<LI>You can use a scanner to scan a printed photograph.  Make sure you save it as JPG or PNG format.
11  
-<LI>If you're artistic, you might draw a picture using a paint program.
12  
-<LI>Lastly, you can "steal" images from the web.  <A TARGET=google HREF="http://images.google.com/">http://images.google.com</A> is a superb place to search for images. Once you find one, you can "right-click" on them with the mouse and choose "Save this image..." from the menu (different computers may vary slightly).
13  
-</OL>
14  
-
15  
-<P>To upload the image, click the "Browse" button on this editing page, and select the image from your hard disk.
16  
-<P>NOTE: Make sure that the file is not larger than the maximum size listed, or it will not be uploaded.
17  
-<P>Then click "Update my Profile" at the bottom - the image file will be cropped to a square and resized down to 100x100 pixels.
18  
-<P>When you are taken back to your profile page, the image might not appear to have changed.  If this is so, just use the "Reload" button in your browser.
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Uploading a picture</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>You can upload a picture from your computer to this server, and this picture will be used in various places to represent you.
  4
+<P>For this reason, the best images to use are a close-up of your face, but you can use any image you like.
  5
+<P>The picture must be in JPG or PNG format (ie the names will usually end in .jpg or .png).
  6
+<P>You can get a picture file using one of four methods:
  7
+
  8
+<OL>
  9
+<LI>Using a digital camera, your photos will most likely already be on your computer in the right format.
  10
+<LI>You can use a scanner to scan a printed photograph.  Make sure you save it as JPG or PNG format.
  11
+<LI>If you're artistic, you might draw a picture using a paint program.
  12
+<LI>Lastly, you can "steal" images from the web.  <A TARGET=google HREF="http://images.google.com/">http://images.google.com</A> is a superb place to search for images. Once you find one, you can "right-click" on them with the mouse and choose "Save this image..." from the menu (different computers may vary slightly).
  13
+</OL>
  14
+
  15
+<P>To upload the image, click the "Browse" button on this editing page, and select the image from your hard disk.
  16
+<P>NOTE: Make sure that the file is not larger than the maximum size listed, or it will not be uploaded.
  17
+<P>Then click "Update my Profile" at the bottom - the image file will be cropped to a square and resized down to 100x100 pixels.
  18
+<P>When you are taken back to your profile page, the image might not appear to have changed.  If this is so, just use the "Reload" button in your browser.
188  lang/de/help/questions.html
... ...
@@ -1,94 +1,94 @@
1  
-<h2>Asking questions</h2>

2  
-<p>Socratic questions are open-ended, probing questions designed to promote critical 

3  
-  evaluation of ideas, as well as encourage the creation of new ideas. Below are 

4  
-  some examples of such questions:</p>

5  
-<h3>Questions of Clarification</h3>

6  
-<ul>

7  
-  <li>What do you mean by ____?</li>

8  
-  <li>What is your main point?</li>

9  
-  <li>How does _____ relate to _____?</li>

10  
-  <li>Could you put that another way?</li>

11  
-  <li>Is your basic point _____ or _____?</li>

12  
-  <li>What do you think is the main issue here?</li>

13  
-  <li>Let me see if I understand you; do you mean _____ or _____?</li>

14  
-  <li>How does this relate to our problem/discussion/issue?</li>

15  
-  <li>What do you, Mike, mean by this remark? What do you take Mike to mean by 

16  
-    his remark?</li>

17  
-  <li>Jane, can you summarize in your own words what Richard said? . . . Richard, 

18  
-    is this what you meant?</li>

19  
-  <li>Could you give me an example?</li>

20  
-  <li>Would this be an example, . . .?</li>

21  
-  <li>Could you explain this further?</li>

22  
-  <li>Would you say more about that?</li>

23  
-  <li>Why do you say that?</li>

24  
-</ul>

25  
-<h3>Questions that probe assumptions</h3>

26  
-<ul>

27  
-  <li>What are you assuming?</li>

28  
-  <li>What is Jenny assuming?</li>

29  
-  <li>What could we assume instead?</li>

30  
-  <li>You seem to be assuming _____. Do I understand you correctly?</li>

31  
-  <li>All of your reasoning depends on the idea that _____. Why have you based 

32  
-    your reasoning on _____ instead of _____?</li>

33  
-  <li>You seem to be assuming _____. How do you justify taking that for granted?</li>

34  
-  <li>Is that always the case? Why do you think the assumption holds here?</li>

35  
-  <li>Why would someone make that assumption? </li>

36  
-</ul>

37  
-<h3>Questions that probe reasons and evidence</h3>

38  
-<ul>

39  
-  <li>What would be an example?</li>

40  
-  <li>How do you know?</li>

41  
-  <li>Why do you think that is true?</li>

42  
-  <li>Do you have any evidence for that?</li>

43  
-  <li>What difference does that make?</li>

44  
-  <li>What are your reasons for saying that?</li>

45  
-  <li>What other information do you need?</li>

46  
-  <li>Could you explain your reasons to us?</li>

47  
-  <li>Are these reasons adequate?</li>

48  
-  <li>Why do you say that?</li>

49  
-  <li>What led you to that belief?</li>

50  
-  <li>How does that apply to this case?</li>

51  
-  <li>What would change your mind?</li>

52  
-  <li>But, is that good evidence for that belief?</li>

53  
-  <li>Is there a reason to doubt that evidence?</li>

54  
-  <li>Who is in a position to know that is true?</li>

55  
-  <li>What would you say to someone who said that ____?</li>

56  
-  <li>Can someone else give evidence to support that view?</li>

57  
-  <li>By what reasoning did you come to that conclusion?</li>

58  
-  <li>How could we find out if that is true? </li>

59  
-</ul>

60  
-<h3>Questions about Viewpoints or Perspectives </h3>

61  
-<ul>

62  
-  <li>The term &quot;imply&quot; will require clarification when used with younger 

63  
-    students.</li>

64  
-  <li>What are you implying by that?</li>

65  
-  <li>When you say _____, are you implying _____?</li>

66  
-  <li>But, if that happened, what else would happen as a result? Why?</li>

67  
-  <li>What effect would that have?</li>

68  
-  <li>Would that necessarily happen or only possibly/probably happen?</li>

69  
-  <li>What is an alternative?</li>

70  
-  <li>If _____ and _____ are the case, then what might also be true?</li>

71  
-  <li>If we say that ____ is ethical, how about _____? </li>

72  
-</ul>

73  
-<h3>Questions that Probe Implications and Consequences </h3>

74  
-<ul>

75  
-  <li>How can we find out?</li>

76  
-  <li>What does this question assume?</li>

77  
-  <li>Would _____ ask this question differently?</li>

78  
-  <li>How could someone settle this question?</li>

79  
-  <li>Can we break this question down at all?</li>

80  
-  <li>Is this question clear? Do we understand it?</li>

81  
-  <li>Is this question easy or hard to answer? Why?</li>

82  
-  <li>Does this question ask us to evaluate something? What?</li>

83  
-  <li>Do we all agree that this is the question?</li>

84  
-  <li>To answer this question, what other questions must we answer first?</li>

85  
-  <li>I'm not sure I understand how you are interpreting this question. Is this 

86  
-    the same as _____?</li>

87  
-  <li>How would _____ state the issue?</li>

88  
-  <li>Why is this issue important?</li>

89  
-  <li>Is this the most important question, or is there an underlying question 

90  
-    that is really the issue? </li>

91  
-</ul>

92  
-

93  
-<HR>

94  
-<FONT SIZE=1><I>Questions adapted from Paul, R. (1993). Critical Thinking: How To Prepare Students for a Rapidly Changing World: Foundation for Critical Thinking, Santa Rosa, CA. </I></FONT>

  1
+<h2>Asking questions</h2>
  2
+<p>Socratic questions are open-ended, probing questions designed to promote critical 
  3
+  evaluation of ideas, as well as encourage the creation of new ideas. Below are 
  4
+  some examples of such questions:</p>
  5
+<h3>Questions of Clarification</h3>
  6
+<ul>
  7
+  <li>What do you mean by ____?</li>
  8
+  <li>What is your main point?</li>
  9
+  <li>How does _____ relate to _____?</li>
  10
+  <li>Could you put that another way?</li>
  11
+  <li>Is your basic point _____ or _____?</li>
  12
+  <li>What do you think is the main issue here?</li>
  13
+  <li>Let me see if I understand you; do you mean _____ or _____?</li>
  14
+  <li>How does this relate to our problem/discussion/issue?</li>
  15
+  <li>What do you, Mike, mean by this remark? What do you take Mike to mean by 
  16
+    his remark?</li>
  17
+  <li>Jane, can you summarize in your own words what Richard said? . . . Richard, 
  18
+    is this what you meant?</li>
  19
+  <li>Could you give me an example?</li>
  20
+  <li>Would this be an example, . . .?</li>
  21
+  <li>Could you explain this further?</li>
  22
+  <li>Would you say more about that?</li>
  23
+  <li>Why do you say that?</li>
  24
+</ul>
  25
+<h3>Questions that probe assumptions</h3>
  26
+<ul>
  27
+  <li>What are you assuming?</li>
  28
+  <li>What is Jenny assuming?</li>
  29
+  <li>What could we assume instead?</li>
  30
+  <li>You seem to be assuming _____. Do I understand you correctly?</li>
  31
+  <li>All of your reasoning depends on the idea that _____. Why have you based 
  32
+    your reasoning on _____ instead of _____?</li>
  33
+  <li>You seem to be assuming _____. How do you justify taking that for granted?</li>
  34
+  <li>Is that always the case? Why do you think the assumption holds here?</li>
  35
+  <li>Why would someone make that assumption? </li>
  36
+</ul>
  37
+<h3>Questions that probe reasons and evidence</h3>
  38
+<ul>
  39
+  <li>What would be an example?</li>
  40
+  <li>How do you know?</li>
  41
+  <li>Why do you think that is true?</li>
  42
+  <li>Do you have any evidence for that?</li>
  43
+  <li>What difference does that make?</li>
  44
+  <li>What are your reasons for saying that?</li>
  45
+  <li>What other information do you need?</li>
  46
+  <li>Could you explain your reasons to us?</li>
  47
+  <li>Are these reasons adequate?</li>
  48
+  <li>Why do you say that?</li>
  49
+  <li>What led you to that belief?</li>
  50
+  <li>How does that apply to this case?</li>
  51
+  <li>What would change your mind?</li>
  52
+  <li>But, is that good evidence for that belief?</li>
  53
+  <li>Is there a reason to doubt that evidence?</li>
  54
+  <li>Who is in a position to know that is true?</li>
  55
+  <li>What would you say to someone who said that ____?</li>
  56
+  <li>Can someone else give evidence to support that view?</li>
  57
+  <li>By what reasoning did you come to that conclusion?</li>
  58
+  <li>How could we find out if that is true? </li>
  59
+</ul>
  60
+<h3>Questions about Viewpoints or Perspectives </h3>
  61
+<ul>
  62
+  <li>The term &quot;imply&quot; will require clarification when used with younger 
  63
+    students.</li>
  64
+  <li>What are you implying by that?</li>
  65
+  <li>When you say _____, are you implying _____?</li>
  66
+  <li>But, if that happened, what else would happen as a result? Why?</li>
  67
+  <li>What effect would that have?</li>
  68
+  <li>Would that necessarily happen or only possibly/probably happen?</li>
  69
+  <li>What is an alternative?</li>
  70
+  <li>If _____ and _____ are the case, then what might also be true?</li>
  71
+  <li>If we say that ____ is ethical, how about _____? </li>
  72
+</ul>
  73
+<h3>Questions that Probe Implications and Consequences </h3>
  74
+<ul>
  75
+  <li>How can we find out?</li>
  76
+  <li>What does this question assume?</li>
  77
+  <li>Would _____ ask this question differently?</li>
  78
+  <li>How could someone settle this question?</li>
  79
+  <li>Can we break this question down at all?</li>
  80
+  <li>Is this question clear? Do we understand it?</li>
  81
+  <li>Is this question easy or hard to answer? Why?</li>
  82
+  <li>Does this question ask us to evaluate something? What?</li>
  83
+  <li>Do we all agree that this is the question?</li>
  84
+  <li>To answer this question, what other questions must we answer first?</li>
  85
+  <li>I'm not sure I understand how you are interpreting this question. Is this 
  86
+    the same as _____?</li>
  87
+  <li>How would _____ state the issue?</li>
  88
+  <li>Why is this issue important?</li>
  89
+  <li>Is this the most important question, or is there an underlying question 
  90
+    that is really the issue? </li>
  91
+</ul>
  92
+
  93
+<HR>
  94
+<FONT SIZE=1><I>Questions adapted from Paul, R. (1993). Critical Thinking: How To Prepare Students for a Rapidly Changing World: Foundation for Critical Thinking, Santa Rosa, CA. </I></FONT>
17  lang/de/help/richtext.html
... ...
@@ -1,8 +1,19 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>About the Rich Text HTML editor</B></P>
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>About the Richtext HTML editor</B></P>
2 2
 
3  
-<P>The Rich Text editor is currently only available when using Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 or later.
  3
+<P>Availability: <B>
  4
+<? if (!$CFG->htmleditor) {
  5
+       print_string("htmleditordisabledadmin");
  6
+   } else if (!$USER->htmleditor) {
  7
+       print_string("htmleditordisabled");
  8
+   } else if (!can_use_richtext_editor()) {
  9
+       print_string("htmleditordisabledbrowser");
  10
+   } else {
  11
+       print_string("htmleditoravailable");
  12
+   }
  13
+?>
  14
+</B></P>
4 15
 
5  
-<P>It provides a word-processor interface embedded in your web page to allow you to edit text in an intuitive way, and produces normal HTML code.
  16
+<P>The Richtext HTML editor provides a word-processor interface embedded in your web page to allow you to edit text in an intuitive way, and produces normal HTML code.
6 17
 
7 18
 <P>In addition to formatting text, this editor provides a number of extra features you may find useful.
8 19
 
198  lang/de/help/surveys.html
... ...
@@ -1,99 +1,99 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Available surveys</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>Currently, Moodle only offers specific types of surveys (future versions 
4  
-will enable you to create your own).</P>
5  
-
6  
-<P>The available surveys have been chosen as being particularly useful for 
7  
-evaluating online learning environments that use a constructivist pedagogy. 
8  
-They are useful to identify certain trends that may be happening among
9  
-your participants.
10  
-
11  
-(To see a paper where these are used in a detailed analysis, see:  
12  
-<A TARGET=paper HREF="http://dougiamas.com/writing/herdsa2002">http://dougiamas.com/writing/herdsa2002</A>)</P>
13  
-
14  
-<HR>
15  
-<P><B>COLLES - Constructivist On-Line Learning Environment Survey</B></P>
16  
-<UL>
17  
-  <p>The COLLES comprises an economical 24 statements grouped into six scales, 
18  
-    each of which helps us address a key question about the quality of the on-line 
19  
-    learning environment: </p>
20  
-
21  
-<table BORDER="0" CELLSPACING="10" CELLPADDING="10">
22  
-  <tr> 
23  
-    <td valign=top>Relevance</td>
24  
-    <td>How relevant is on-line learning to students' professional practices? 
25  
-    </td>
26  
-  </tr>
27  
-  <tr> 
28  
-    <td valign=top>Reflection </td>
29  
-
30  
-    <td>Does on-line learning stimulate students' critical reflective thinking? 
31  
-    </td>
32  
-  </tr>
33  
-  <tr> 
34  
-    <td valign=top>Interactivity </td>
35  
-    <td>To what extent do students engage on-line in rich educative dialogue? 
36  
-    </td>
37  
-  </tr>
38  
-  <tr> 
39  
-    <td valign=top>Tutor Support</td>
40  
-
41  
-    <td>How well do tutors enable students to participate in on-line learning? 
42  
-    </td>
43  
-  </tr>
44  
-  <tr> 
45  
-    <td valign=top>Peer Support </td>
46  
-    <td>Is sensitive and encouraging support provided on-line by fellow students? 
47  
-    </td>
48  
-  </tr>
49  
-  <tr> 
50  
-    <td valign=top>Interpretation </td>
51  
-
52  
-    <td>Do students and tutors make good sense of each other's on-line communications?</td>
53  
-  </tr>
54  
-</table>
55  
-
56  
-  <p>Underpinning the dynamic view of learning is a new theory of knowing: social 
57  
-    constructivism, which portrays the learner as an active conceptualiser within 
58  
-    a socially interactive learning environment. Social constructivism is an epistemology, 
59  
-    or way of knowing, in which learners collaborate reflectively to co-construct 
60  
-    new understandings, especially in the context of mutual inquiry grounded in 
61  
-    their personal experience. </p>
62  
-
63  
-  <p>Central to this collaboration is the development of students' communicative 
64  
-    competence, that is, the ability to engage in open and critical discourse 
65  
-    with both the teacher and peers. This discourse is characterised by an empathic 
66  
-    orientation to constructing reciprocal understanding, and a critical attitude 
67  
-    towards examining underlying assumptions. </p>
68  
-
69  
-  <p>The COLLES has been designed to enable you
70  
-    to monitor the extent to which you are able to exploit the interactive capacity 
71  
-    of the World Wide Web for engaging students in dynamic learning practices. </p>
72  
-
73  
-<P>
74  
-(This information has been adapted from the COLLES page.  You can find out more about 
75  
-COLLES and the authors of it at: 
76  
-<A TARGET=paper HREF="http://surveylearning.com/colles/">http://surveylearning.com/colles/</A>)</P>
77  
-</UL>
78  
-
79  
-
80  
-<HR>
81  
-<P><B>ATTLS - Attitudes to Thinking and Learning Survey</B></P>
82  
-<UL>
83  
-
84  
-<P>The theory of 'ways of knowing', originally from the field of gender research (Belenky et al., 1986) provides us with a survey tool to examine the quality of discourse within a collaborative environment. 
85  
-
86  
-<P>The Attitudes Towards Thinking and Learning Survey (ATTLS) is an instrument developed by Galotti et al. (1999) to measure the extent to which a person is a 'connected knower' (CK) or a 'separate knower' (SK). 
87  
-
88  
-<P>People with higher CK scores tend to find learning more enjoyable, and are often more cooperative, congenial and more willing to build on the ideas of others, while those with higher SK scores tend to take a more critical and argumentative stance to learning. 
89  
-
90  
-<P>Studies have shown that these two learning styles are independent of each other (Galotti et al., 1999; Galotti et al., 2001). Additionally, they are only a reflection of learning attitudes, not learning capacities or intellectual power. 
91  
-
92  
-<P><I>Belenky, M. F., Clinchy, B. M., Goldberger, N. R., & Tarule, J. M. (1986). Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind. New York: Basic Books, Inc. </I></P>
93  
-
94  
-<P><I>Galotti, K. M., Clinchy, B. M., Ainsworth, K., Lavin, B., & Mansfield, A. F. (1999). A New Way of Assessing Ways of Knowing: The Attitudes Towards Thinking and Learning Survey (ATTLS). Sex Roles, 40(9/10), 745-766.</I></P>
95  
-
96  
-<P><I>Galotti, K. M., Reimer, R. L., & Drebus, D. W. (2001). Ways of knowing as learning styles: Learning MAGIC with a partner. Sex Roles, 44(7/8), 419-436.</I></P>
97  
-
98  
-
99  
-</UL>
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Available surveys</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>Currently, Moodle only offers specific types of surveys (future versions 
  4
+will enable you to create your own).</P>
  5
+
  6
+<P>The available surveys have been chosen as being particularly useful for 
  7
+evaluating online learning environments that use a constructivist pedagogy. 
  8
+They are useful to identify certain trends that may be happening among
  9
+your participants.
  10
+
  11
+(To see a paper where these are used in a detailed analysis, see:  
  12
+<A TARGET=paper HREF="http://dougiamas.com/writing/herdsa2002">http://dougiamas.com/writing/herdsa2002</A>)</P>
  13
+
  14
+<HR>
  15
+<P><B>COLLES - Constructivist On-Line Learning Environment Survey</B></P>
  16
+<UL>
  17
+  <p>The COLLES comprises an economical 24 statements grouped into six scales, 
  18
+    each of which helps us address a key question about the quality of the on-line 
  19
+    learning environment: </p>
  20
+
  21
+<table BORDER="0" CELLSPACING="10" CELLPADDING="10">
  22
+  <tr> 
  23
+    <td valign=top>Relevance</td>
  24
+    <td>How relevant is on-line learning to students' professional practices? 
  25
+    </td>
  26
+  </tr>
  27
+  <tr> 
  28
+    <td valign=top>Reflection </td>
  29
+
  30
+    <td>Does on-line learning stimulate students' critical reflective thinking? 
  31
+    </td>
  32
+  </tr>
  33
+  <tr> 
  34
+    <td valign=top>Interactivity </td>
  35
+    <td>To what extent do students engage on-line in rich educative dialogue? 
  36
+    </td>
  37
+  </tr>
  38
+  <tr> 
  39
+    <td valign=top>Tutor Support</td>
  40
+
  41
+    <td>How well do tutors enable students to participate in on-line learning? 
  42
+    </td>
  43
+  </tr>
  44
+  <tr> 
  45
+    <td valign=top>Peer Support </td>
  46
+    <td>Is sensitive and encouraging support provided on-line by fellow students? 
  47
+    </td>
  48
+  </tr>
  49
+  <tr> 
  50
+    <td valign=top>Interpretation </td>
  51
+
  52
+    <td>Do students and tutors make good sense of each other's on-line communications?</td>
  53
+  </tr>
  54
+</table>
  55
+
  56
+  <p>Underpinning the dynamic view of learning is a new theory of knowing: social 
  57
+    constructivism, which portrays the learner as an active conceptualiser within 
  58
+    a socially interactive learning environment. Social constructivism is an epistemology, 
  59
+    or way of knowing, in which learners collaborate reflectively to co-construct 
  60
+    new understandings, especially in the context of mutual inquiry grounded in 
  61
+    their personal experience. </p>
  62
+
  63
+  <p>Central to this collaboration is the development of students' communicative 
  64
+    competence, that is, the ability to engage in open and critical discourse 
  65
+    with both the teacher and peers. This discourse is characterised by an empathic 
  66
+    orientation to constructing reciprocal understanding, and a critical attitude 
  67
+    towards examining underlying assumptions. </p>
  68
+
  69
+  <p>The COLLES has been designed to enable you
  70
+    to monitor the extent to which you are able to exploit the interactive capacity 
  71
+    of the World Wide Web for engaging students in dynamic learning practices. </p>
  72
+
  73
+<P>
  74
+(This information has been adapted from the COLLES page.  You can find out more about 
  75
+COLLES and the authors of it at: 
  76
+<A TARGET=paper HREF="http://surveylearning.com/colles/">http://surveylearning.com/colles/</A>)</P>
  77
+</UL>
  78
+
  79
+
  80
+<HR>
  81
+<P><B>ATTLS - Attitudes to Thinking and Learning Survey</B></P>
  82
+<UL>
  83
+
  84
+<P>The theory of 'ways of knowing', originally from the field of gender research (Belenky et al., 1986) provides us with a survey tool to examine the quality of discourse within a collaborative environment. 
  85
+
  86
+<P>The Attitudes Towards Thinking and Learning Survey (ATTLS) is an instrument developed by Galotti et al. (1999) to measure the extent to which a person is a 'connected knower' (CK) or a 'separate knower' (SK). 
  87
+
  88
+<P>People with higher CK scores tend to find learning more enjoyable, and are often more cooperative, congenial and more willing to build on the ideas of others, while those with higher SK scores tend to take a more critical and argumentative stance to learning. 
  89
+
  90
+<P>Studies have shown that these two learning styles are independent of each other (Galotti et al., 1999; Galotti et al., 2001). Additionally, they are only a reflection of learning attitudes, not learning capacities or intellectual power. 
  91
+
  92
+<P><I>Belenky, M. F., Clinchy, B. M., Goldberger, N. R., & Tarule, J. M. (1986). Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind. New York: Basic Books, Inc. </I></P>
  93
+
  94
+<P><I>Galotti, K. M., Clinchy, B. M., Ainsworth, K., Lavin, B., & Mansfield, A. F. (1999). A New Way of Assessing Ways of Knowing: The Attitudes Towards Thinking and Learning Survey (ATTLS). Sex Roles, 40(9/10), 745-766.</I></P>
  95
+
  96
+<P><I>Galotti, K. M., Reimer, R. L., & Drebus, D. W. (2001). Ways of knowing as learning styles: Learning MAGIC with a partner. Sex Roles, 44(7/8), 419-436.</I></P>
  97
+
  98
+
  99
+</UL>
44  lang/de/help/teachers.html
... ...
@@ -1,22 +1,22 @@
1  
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Teachers</B></P>
2  
-
3  
-<P>This page shows the list of people who are assigned to be 
4  
-   "teachers" in this course (by the system administrator).
5  
-
6  
-<P>You can use this form to assign a role (title) to each person 
7  
-   such as "Professor", "Tutor", "Assistant" and so on.  These 
8  
-   will appear on the site's course listing and also on the 
9  
-   list of participants for your course.   If you leave the 
10  
-   role empty then the default word for teacher will be used
11  
-   (the one you set in the Course Settings page).
12  
-
13  
-<P>You can also order this list (to put the main teacher at the 
14  
-   top, for example).  Simply select numbers from the menus
15  
-   in the "Order" column. After pressing "Save changes" you will 
16  
-   see the new order.
17  
-
18  
-<P><B>NOTE:</B> A special case occurs if you use select "Hide"
19  
-   for a teacher.  In this case, the teacher will 
20  
-   NOT BE SHOWN on the course listings or the list of 
21  
-   participants.  They will be "hidden" from students
22  
-   (unless they post messages to the forums etc)
  1
+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Teachers</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+<P>This page shows the list of people who are assigned to be 
  4
+   "teachers" in this course (by the system administrator).
  5
+
  6
+<P>You can use this form to assign a role (title) to each person 
  7
+   such as "Professor", "Tutor", "Assistant" and so on.  These 
  8
+   will appear on the site's course listing and also on the 
  9
+   list of participants for your course.   If you leave the 
  10
+   role empty then the default word for teacher will be used
  11
+   (the one you set in the Course Settings page).
  12
+
  13
+<P>You can also order this list (to put the main teacher at the 
  14
+   top, for example).  Simply select numbers from the menus
  15
+   in the "Order" column. After pressing "Save changes" you will 
  16
+   see the new order.
  17
+
  18
+<P><B>NOTE:</B> A special case occurs if you use select "Hide"
  19
+   for a teacher.  In this case, the teacher will 
  20
+   NOT BE SHOWN on the course listings or the list of 
  21
+   participants.  They will be "hidden" from students
  22
+   (unless they post messages to the forums etc)
187  lang/de/help/text.html
... ...
@@ -1,43 +1,144 @@
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-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Help on writing text</B></P>
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-
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-Writing text in Moodle works pretty much the way you would expect, but you also have the ability to include "smilies", "URL addresses" and some HTML tags in your text.
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-
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-<P><B>Smilies (emoticons)</B></P>
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-<UL>
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-<TABLE BORDER=0 CELLPADDING=5 CELLSPACING=5>
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-<TR><TH>Name       <TH>Picture                                                 <TH>You type</TR>
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-<TR><TD>smile      <TD ALIGN=CENTER><img ALT=smile SRC="<?=$CFG->wwwroot?>/pix/s/smiley.gif"><TD ALIGN=CENTER> :-) </TD></TR>
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-<TR><TD>sad        <TD ALIGN=CENTER><img ALT=sad SRC="<?=$CFG->wwwroot?>/pix/s/sad.gif"><TD ALIGN=CENTER> :-( </TD></TR>
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-<TR><TD>grin       <TD ALIGN=CENTER><img ALT=grin SRC="<?=$CFG->wwwroot?>/pix/s/biggrin.gif"><TD ALIGN=CENTER> :-D </TD></TR>
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-<TR><TD>wink       <TD ALIGN=CENTER><img ALT=wink SRC="<?=$CFG->wwwroot?>/pix/s/wink.gif"><TD ALIGN=CENTER> ;-) </TD></TR>
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-<TR><TD>mixed      <TD ALIGN=CENTER><img ALT=mixed SRC="<?=$CFG->wwwroot?>/pix/s/mixed.gif"><TD ALIGN=CENTER> :-/ </TD></TR>
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-<TR><TD>wide-eyed  <TD ALIGN=CENTER><img ALT=wide-eyed SRC="<?=$CFG->wwwroot?>/pix/s/wideeyes.gif"><TD ALIGN=CENTER> 8-) </TD></TR>
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-<TR><TD>tongue-out <TD ALIGN=CENTER><img ALT=tongue-out SRC="<?=$CFG->wwwroot?>/pix/s/tongueout.gif"><TD ALIGN=CENTER> :-P </TD></TR>
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-<TR><TD>surprise   <TD ALIGN=CENTER><img ALT=surprised SRC="<?=$CFG->wwwroot?>/pix/s/surprise.gif"><TD ALIGN=CENTER> :-o </TD></TR>
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-<TR><TD>cool       <TD ALIGN=CENTER><img ALT=cool SRC="<?=$CFG->wwwroot?>/pix/s/cool.gif"><TD ALIGN=CENTER> B-) </TD></TR>
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-</TABLE>
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-</UL>
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-
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-<P><B>URLs</B></P>
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-<UL>
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-<P>Any "word" starting with <B>www.</B> or <B>http://</B> will automatically be turned into a clickable link. 
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-<P>For example:  <A HREF="http://www.yahoo.com">www.yahoo.com</A> or <A HREF="http://curtin.edu">http://curtin.edu</A>
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-</UL>
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-
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-<P><B>HTML tags</B></P>
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-<UL>
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-<P>You can use a limited subset of HTML tags to add emphasis to your texts.
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-<TABLE BORDER=0 CELLPADDING=5 CELLSPACING=5>
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-<TR><TH>HTML tags<TH>Produces</TR>
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-<TR><TD>&lt;B> bold &lt;/B> <TD> <B>bold text</B> </TR>
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-<TR><TD>&lt;I> italic &lt;/I> <TD> <I>italic text</I> </TR>
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-<TR><TD>&lt;U> underline &lt;/U> <TD> <U>underlined text</U> </TR>
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-<TR><TD>&lt;FONT SIZE=1> small &lt;/FONT> <TD> <FONT SIZE=1>small</FONT> </TR>
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-<TR><TD>&lt;FONT SIZE=4> large &lt;/FONT> <TD> <FONT SIZE=4>large</FONT> </TR>
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-<TR><TD>&lt;FONT COLOR=green> example &lt;/FONT> <TD> <FONT color=green>example</FONT> </TR>
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-<TR><TD valign=top>&lt;UL>&lt;LI>one &lt;LI>two &lt;/UL> <TD valign=top> <UL><LI>one<LI>two</UL> </TR>
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-<TR><TD>&lt;HR><TD> <HR> </TR>
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-</TABLE>
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-</UL>
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-
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-
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+<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Help on writing text</B></P>
  2
+
  3
+Writing text in Moodle works pretty much the way you would expect, but you also have the ability to include "smilies", "URL addresses" and some HTML tags in your text.
  4
+
  5
+<P><B>Smilies (emoticons)</B></P>
  6
+<UL>
  7
+<P>To embed these small icons in your text, just type the associated code.  These codes themselves are like little pictures if you turn your head to the left when looking at them.</P>
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+
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+    <table border="1">
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+      <tr valign="top">
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+        <td>
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+        <table border="0" align="center" cellpadding="10">
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+          <tr>
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+            <td><img border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/smiley.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+            <td>smile</td>
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+            <td><FONT FACE=Courier>:-)</td>
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+          </tr>
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+          <tr>
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+            <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/biggrin.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+            <td>big grin</td>
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+            <td><FONT FACE=Courier>:-D</td>
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+          </tr>
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+          <tr>
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+            <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/wink.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+            <td>wink</td>
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+            <td><FONT FACE=Courier>;-)</td>
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+          </tr>
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+          <tr>
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+            <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/mixed.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+            <td>mixed</td>
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+            <td><FONT FACE=Courier>:-/</td>
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+          </tr>
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+            <tr>
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+              <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/thoughtful.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+              <td>thoughtful</td>
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+              <td><FONT FACE=Courier>V-.</FONT></td>
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+            </tr>
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+          <tr>
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+            <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/tongueout.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+            <td>tongue out</td>
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+            <td><FONT FACE=Courier>:-P</td>
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+         </tr>
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+          <tr>
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+            <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/cool.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+            <td>cool</td>
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+            <td><FONT FACE=Courier>B-)</td>
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+          </tr>
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+            <tr>
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+              <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/approve.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+              <td>approve</td>
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+              <td><FONT FACE=Courier>^-)</td>
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+            </tr>
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+            <tr>
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+              <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/wideeyes.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+              <td>wide eyes</td>
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+              <td><FONT FACE=Courier>8-)</td>
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+            </tr>
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+            <tr>
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+              <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/surprise.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+              <td>surprise</td>
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+              <td><FONT FACE=Courier>8-o</td>
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+            </tr>
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+        </table>
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+        </td>
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+        <td>
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+        <table border="0" align="center" cellpadding="10">
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+            <tr>
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+              <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/sad.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+              <td>sad</td>
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+              <td><FONT FACE=Courier>:-(</td>
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+            </tr>
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+            <tr>
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+              <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/shy.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+              <td>shy</td>
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+              <td><FONT FACE=Courier>8-.</td>
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+            </tr>
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+          <tr>
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+            <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/blush.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+            <td>blush</td>
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+            <td><FONT FACE=Courier>:-I</td>
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+          </tr>
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+            <tr>
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+              <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/kiss.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+              <td>kisses</td>
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+              <td><FONT FACE=Courier>:-X</td>
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+            </tr>
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+          <tr>
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+            <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/clown.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+            <td>clown</td>
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+            <td><FONT FACE=Courier>:o)</td>
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+          </tr>
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+          <tr>
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+            <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/blackeye.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+            <td>black eye</td>
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+            <td><FONT FACE=Courier>P-|</td>
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+          </tr>
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+            <tr>
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+              <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/angry.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+              <td>angry</td>
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+              <td><FONT FACE=Courier>8-[</td>
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+            </tr>
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+            <tr>
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+              <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/dead.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+              <td>dead</td>
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+              <td><FONT FACE=Courier>xx-P</td>
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+            </tr>
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+            <tr>
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+              <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/sleepy.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+              <td>sleepy</td>
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+              <td><FONT FACE=Courier>|-.</td>
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+            </tr>
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+          <tr>
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+            <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/evil.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
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+            <td>evil</td>
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+            <td><FONT FACE=Courier>}-]</td>
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+          </tr>
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+        </table>
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+    </table>
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+
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+</UL>
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+
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+<P><B>URLs</B></P>
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+<UL>
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+<P>Any "word" starting with <B>www.</B> or <B>http://</B> will automatically be turned into a clickable link. 
  125
+<P>For example:  <A HREF="http://www.yahoo.com">www.yahoo.com</A> or <A HREF="http://curtin.edu">http://curtin.edu</A>
  126
+</UL>
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+
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+<P><B>HTML tags</B></P>
  129
+<UL>
  130
+<P>You can use a limited subset of HTML tags to add emphasis to your texts.
  131
+<TABLE BORDER=0 CELLPADDING=5 CELLSPACING=5>
  132
+<TR><TH>HTML tags<TH>Produces</TR>
  133
+<TR><TD>&lt;B> bold &lt;/B> <TD> <B>bold text</B> </TR>
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+<TR><TD>&lt;I> italic &lt;/I> <TD> <I>italic text</I> </TR>
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+<TR><TD>&lt;U> underline &lt;/U> <TD> <U>underlined text</U> </TR>
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+<TR><TD>&lt;FONT SIZE=1> small &lt;/FONT> <TD> <FONT SIZE=1>small</FONT> </TR>
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+<TR><TD>&lt;FONT SIZE=4> large &lt;/FONT> <TD> <FONT SIZE=4>large</FONT> </TR>
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+<TR><TD>&lt;FONT COLOR=green> example &lt;/FONT> <TD> <FONT color=green>example</FONT> </TR>
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+<TR><TD valign=top>&lt;UL>&lt;LI>one &lt;LI>two &lt;/UL> <TD valign=top> <UL><LI>one<LI>two</UL> </TR>
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+<TR><TD>&lt;HR><TD> <HR> </TR>
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+</TABLE>
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+</UL>
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+
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+

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