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removing English help files from non-English language packs

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1 parent e87b8fd commit d0e5068b54fbf83a6aa4b84788105345e6455219 koenr committed Jul 6, 2004
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  1. +0 −18 lang/ca/help/reading/readingtype.html
  2. +0 −8 lang/ca/help/reading/summary.html
  3. +0 −120 lang/el/help/emoticons.html
  4. +0 −10 lang/el/help/quiz/createmultiple.html
  5. +0 −54 lang/el/help/quiz/import.html
  6. +0 −11 lang/el/help/quiz/match.html
  7. +0 −14 lang/el/help/quiz/randomsamatch.html
  8. +0 −13 lang/el/help/quiz/shuffleanswers.html
  9. +0 −11 lang/el/help/quiz/shufflequestions.html
  10. +0 −18 lang/el/help/scales.html
  11. +0 −10 lang/el/help/summaries.html
  12. +0 −122 lang/el/help/wiki.html
  13. +0 −20 lang/el/help/workshop/addingacomment.html
  14. +0 −35 lang/el/help/workshop/agreeassessments.html
  15. +0 −14 lang/el/help/workshop/anonymous.html
  16. +0 −21 lang/el/help/workshop/assignmenttype.html
  17. +0 −23 lang/el/help/workshop/breakdownoffinalgrade.html
  18. +0 −54 lang/el/help/workshop/calculatingfinalgrade.html
  19. +0 −6 lang/el/help/workshop/editingacomment.html
  20. +0 −56 lang/el/help/workshop/elements.html
  21. +0 −21 lang/el/help/workshop/finalgrades.html
  22. +0 −14 lang/el/help/workshop/graded.html
  23. +0 −32 lang/el/help/workshop/grading.html
  24. +0 −20 lang/el/help/workshop/gradingassessments.html
  25. +0 −73 lang/el/help/workshop/gradingstrategy.html
  26. +0 −13 lang/el/help/workshop/includeself.html
  27. +0 −58 lang/el/help/workshop/managing.html
  28. +0 −13 lang/el/help/workshop/nassessmentsofstudentsubmissions.html
  29. +0 −10 lang/el/help/workshop/nassessmentsofteachersexamples.html
  30. +0 −15 lang/el/help/workshop/nelements.html
  31. +0 −30 lang/el/help/workshop/numberofassessors.html
  32. +0 −19 lang/el/help/workshop/resubmit.html
  33. +0 −12 lang/el/help/workshop/selfassessment.html
  34. +0 −15 lang/el/help/workshop/showinggrades.html
  35. +0 −11 lang/el/help/workshop/specimen.html
  36. +0 −13 lang/el/help/workshop/teachersgradings.html
View
18 lang/ca/help/reading/readingtype.html
@@ -1,18 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Reading Type</B></P>
-
-<P>Readings are any content you can dream up. These are the
- different types, which mostly specify how the content is
- to be accessed:
-
-<P><B>Plain text</B> - the easiest type. You can just type (edit) the page into a form on the following page.
-
-<P><B>Reference</B> - a scholarly reference to a journal or book.
-
-<P><B>Uploaded file</B> - displays any file you have uploaded into the course. See the 'Files' section.
-
-<P><B>Web Link</B> - A URL to somewhere on the web. When anyone clicks on this reading
-activity they will be taken out of the course (the page you've specified will fill the browser window).
-
-<P><B>Web page</B> - A URL to somewhere on the web. Like the previous type, this
-will display a web page. Unlike the previous type, though, the page will displayed
-within a frame, as if it is integrated within the course.
View
8 lang/ca/help/reading/summary.html
@@ -1,8 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Reading Summary</B></P>
-
-<P>The summary is a very short description of the resource.
-
-<P>Do not be tempted to write too much here, or to include the
- resource itself!
-
-<P>You'll get a chance to specify the content on the next page.
View
120 lang/el/help/emoticons.html
@@ -1,120 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Using Smilies (emoticons)</B></P>
-
-<table border="1" align="center">
- <tr valign="top">
- <td>
- <table border="0" align="center" cellpadding="5">
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext(':-)')"><img border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/smiley.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>smile</td>
- <td><font face="courier">:-)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext(':-D')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/biggrin.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>big grin</td>
- <td><font face="courier">:-D</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext(';-)')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/wink.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>wink</td>
- <td><font face="courier">;-)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext(':-/')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/mixed.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>mixed</td>
- <td><font face="courier">:-/</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('V-.')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/thoughtful.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>thoughtful</td>
- <td><font face="courier">V-.</font></td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext(':-P')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/tongueout.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>tongue out</td>
- <td><font face="courier">:-P</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('B-)')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/cool.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>cool</td>
- <td><font face="courier">B-)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('^-)')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/approve.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>approve</td>
- <td><font face="courier">^-)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('8-)')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/wideeyes.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>wide eyes</td>
- <td><font face="courier">8-)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('8-o')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/surprise.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>surprise</td>
- <td><font face="courier">8-o</td>
- </tr>
- </table>
- </td>
- <td>
- <table border="0" align="center" cellpadding="5">
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext(':-(')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/sad.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>sad</td>
- <td><font face="courier">:-(</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('8-.')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/shy.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>shy</td>
- <td><font face="courier">8-.</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext(':-I')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/blush.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>blush</td>
- <td><font face="courier">:-I</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext(':-X')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/kiss.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>kisses</td>
- <td><font face="courier">:-X</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext(':o)')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/clown.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>clown</td>
- <td><font face="courier">:o)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('P-|')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/blackeye.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>black eye</td>
- <td><font face="courier">P-|</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('8-[')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/angry.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>angry</td>
- <td><font face="courier">8-[</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('xx-P')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/dead.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>dead</td>
- <td><font face="courier">xx-P</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('|-.')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/sleepy.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>sleepy</td>
- <td><font face="courier">|-.</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><a href="javascript:inserttext('}-]')"><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/evil.gif" width="15" height="15"></a></td>
- <td>evil</td>
- <td><font face="courier">}-]</td>
- </tr>
- </table>
-</table>
-
-<P>When writing online, it can sometimes difficult to express emotion with plain text.
- These little icons can help.
-
-<P>To insert these icons in your text: just click the icon above, or type the associated text code directly in your text.</P>
-
-<P>Note that the codes themselves are like little pictures - just turn your head to the left when looking at them</P>
-
View
10 lang/el/help/quiz/createmultiple.html
@@ -1,10 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Create multiple questions</B></P>
-
-<P>This page allows you to create multiple questions at once.</P>
-
-<P>Currently it will only allow you to create a number of
- Random Questions and (optionally) add them to the current
- quiz.</P>
-
-<P>Eventually this page will evolve into a larger wizard that
- will have more options.</P>
View
54 lang/el/help/quiz/import.html
@@ -1,54 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Importing new questions</B></P>
-
-<P>This function allows you to import questions from
- external text files, uploaded through a form.
-
-<P>A number of file formats are supported:
-
-<P><B>Missing Word</B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>This format only supports multiple choice questions.
-Each answer is separated with a tilde (~), and the correct answer is
-prefixed with an equals sign (=). Here is an example:
-
-<BLOCKQUOTE>As soon as we begin to explore our body parts as infants
-we become students of {=anatomy and physiology ~reflexology
-~science ~experiment}, and in a sense we remain students for life.
-</BLOCKQUOTE>
-
-<P>More info: <?php helpbutton("formatmissingword", "", "quiz") ?></P>
-</UL>
-
-
-<P><B>AON</B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>This is the same as Missing Word Format, except that after importing
- the questions all Short-Answer questions are converted four at a time
- into Matching Questions.</P>
-<p>It's named after an organisation that sponsored the development of many
- quiz features</p>
-</UL>
-
-
-<P><B>Blackboard</B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>This module can import questions saved in Blackboard's export
-format. It relies on XML functions being compiled into your PHP.</P>
-
-<P>More info: <?php helpbutton("formatblackboard", "", "quiz") ?></P>
-</UL>
-
-<P><B>Custom</B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>If you have your own format that you need to import, you can
- implement it yourself by editing mod/quiz/format/custom.php
-
-<P>The amount of new code needed is quite small - just enough
- to parse a single question from given text.
-
-<P>More info: <?php helpbutton("formatcustom", "", "quiz") ?></P>
-</UL>
-
-
-<P>More formats are yet to come, including WebCT, IMS QTI and whatever else
- Moodle users can contribute! </p>
View
11 lang/el/help/quiz/match.html
@@ -1,11 +0,0 @@
-<p align=center><b>Matching questions</b></p>
-
-<p>After an optional introduction, the respondent is presented with
- several sub-questions and several jumbled answers. There is one
- correct answer for each question.
-
-<p>The respondent must select an answer to match each sub-question.
-
-<p>Each sub-question is equally weighted to contribute towards the
- grade for the total question.
-
View
14 lang/el/help/quiz/randomsamatch.html
@@ -1,14 +0,0 @@
-<p align=center><b>Random Short-Answer Matching questions</b></p>
-
-<p>After an optional introduction, the respondent is presented with
- several sub-questions and several jumbled answers. There is one
- correct answer for each question.
-
-<p>The respondent must select an answer to match each sub-question.
-
-<p>Each sub-question is equally weighted to contibute towards the
- grade for the total question.
-
-<p>The questions and answers are randomly drawn from the pool of
- "Short Answer" questions in the current category. Each attempt
- on a quiz will have different questions and answers.
View
13 lang/el/help/quiz/shuffleanswers.html
@@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Shuffle answers</B></P>
-
-<p>If you enable this option, then the order of answers within
- each question will be randomly shuffled each time a student
- attempts this quiz.</p>
-
-<p>Of course, this only applies to questions that have multiple
- answers displayed, such as Multiple Choice or Matching Questions.</p>
-
-<p>The intention is simply to make it a little harder for students
- to copy from each other.</p>
-
-<p>This option is not related to the use of Random Questions.</p>
View
11 lang/el/help/quiz/shufflequestions.html
@@ -1,11 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Shuffle questions</B></P>
-
-<p>If you enable this option, then the order of questions in
- the quiz will be randomly shuffled each time a student attempts
- the quiz.</p>
-
-<p>This is not related to the use of Random Questions, this is only
- about the displayed order of questions.</p>
-
-<p>The intention is to make it a little harder for students to copy from
- each other.</p>
View
18 lang/el/help/scales.html
@@ -1,18 +0,0 @@
-<p align="center"><b>Scales</b></p>
-
-<p>Teachers can create new custom scales to be used in a course for any grading activities.</p>
-
-<p>The name of the scale should be a phrase that identifies it clearly: this will appear
- in scale-selection lists, as well as on context-sensitive help buttons.</p>
-
-<p>The scale itself is defined by an ordered list of values, ranging from negative to positive, separated by commas. For example:</p>
-
-<blockquote><i>
- Disappointing, Not good enough, Average, Good, Very good, Excellent!
-</i></blockquote>
-
-<p>Scales should also include a good description of what it means and how it is
- expected to be used. This description will appear in help pages for teachers and students.</p>
-
-<p>Finally, there may be one or more "Standard" scales defined on your site by the
- system administrator. These will be available in all courses.</p>
View
10 lang/el/help/summaries.html
@@ -1,10 +0,0 @@
-<p align=center><b>Topic/Week summaries</b></p>
-
-<p>The idea of a topic summary is a very short text to prepare students
- for the activities within this topic (or week).</p>
-
-<p>Each summary should be very short so that the course page doesn't become too long.</p>
-
-<p>If you find yourself wanting to say more than a sentence or two then
- consider adding a resource to this topic instead (for example, the first activity
- might be a page called <b>About This Topic</b>).</p>
View
122 lang/el/help/wiki.html
@@ -1,122 +0,0 @@
-<p align="center"><b>Help on Writing Wiki Formatted Pages</b></p>
-
-<p>
- Wiki formatted pages provide a facility for marking up plain text with intuitive, human readable
- formatting that will be converted to XHTML when displayed. The big advantages are that you
- do not need to learn HTML to produce quite complex results, and that the text you write
- <em>looks</em> good to the eye even <em>before</em> conversion. It is a real alternative to
- saving Word files as HTML retaining the ability to edit the resource online.
-</p>
-
-<p>You should enter basically plain text. There are a number of <em>special</em> characters you
-can add to insert formatting</p>
-
-<h3>Block level formatting</h3>
-
-<p>
- Paragraph blocks are separated by at least one blank line. To add special formatting to a paragraph
- add one of the following special characters in the first character of the first line of the block followed
- by a space...
-</p>
-
-<table>
- <tr><th>Character</th><th>Block Type</th></tr>
- <tr><td>No character</td><td>Ordinary paragraph</td></tr>
- <tr><td>&gt;</td><td>Quotation</td></tr>
- <tr><td>Space</td><td>Preformatted Text (Monospaced)</td></tr>
- <tr><td>%</td><td>Preformatted <em>and</em> Wikki formatting is ignored</td></tr>
- <tr><td>!#</td><td>Heading - where # is 1-6, the heading level (1 is biggest)</td></tr>
- <tr><td>Q.</td><td>Question - styling info added to paragraph to improve question/answer presentation (in theme)</td></tr>
- <tr><td>A.</td><td>Answer - as above but answer</td></tr>
-</table>
-
-<h3>List Formatting</h3>
-
-<p>Simple lists can be constructed easily by placing a special character at the start of each line in the list followed by a space.
-The list is terminated by a blank line. Lists may be freely nested - and nested lists may change list type. Definition list
-definitions and text types may be freely intermixed to obtain the desired effect. The special characters
-are as follows...</p>
-
-<table>
- <tr><th>Character</th><th>List item type</th></tr>
- <tr><td>*</td><td>Unordered List (bullet points)</td></tr>
- <tr><td>#</td><td>Ordered List (1,2,3 etc)</td></tr>
- <tr><td>:</td><td>Definition list, definition</td></tr>
- <tr><td>;</td><td>Definition list, text</td></tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>Nested lists example:</p>
-<p><pre>
- * First Bullet
- * Second Bullet
- ## nested line 1
- ## nested line 2
- * Third Bullet
-</pre></p>
-<p>Produces:
-<ul><li>First Bullet</li>
- <li>Second Bullet</li>
- <ol><li>nested line 1</li>
- <li>nested line 2</li></ol>
- <li>Third Bullet
-</ul></p>
-
-<h3>Inline formatting</h3>
-
-<p>Inline formmating allows part of a line to be marked as having a particular style. The special
-characters used can appear anywhere on a line, but note that the formatting cannot
-cross lines. Codes are as follows...</p>
-
-<table>
- <tr><th>Example</th><th>Example</th><th>Formatting</th></tr>
- <tr><td>*hello world*</td><td><strong>hello world</strong></td><td>Strong or Bold</td></tr>
- <tr><td>/hello world/</td><td><em>hello world</em></td><td>Emphasis or Italics</td></tr>
- <tr><td>+hello world+</td><td><ins>hello world</ins></td><td>Inserted text</td></tr>
- <tr><td>-hello world-</td><td><del>hello world</del></td><td>Deleted or Strikethrough</td></tr>
- <tr><td>hello ~world~</td><td>hello <sub>world</sub></td><td>Subscript</td></tr>
- <tr><td>hello ^world^</td><td>hello <sup>world</sup></td><td>Superscript</td></tr>
- <tr><td>"hello world"</td><td><q>hello world</q></td><td>Quoted</td></tr>
- <tr><td>%hello world%</td><td><code>hello world</code></td><td>Code or Monospaced</td></tr>
- <tr><td>@hello world@</td><td><cite>hello world</cite></td><td>Cite</td></tr>
-</table>
-
-<h3>Acronyms</h3>
-
-<p>Acronym tagging is acheived by placing the acronym in capital letters followed by the description
-is parenthesis. There must be no space between the acronym and the parenthesis. Example...</p>
-
-<p>HTML(Hypertext Markup Language) <br /> <acronym title="Hypertext Markup Language">HTML</acronym></p>
-
-<h3>Hyper Links</h3>
-
-Links can be placed in the text and are followed (with no spaces) by the text to be displayed in brackets. Example: </em>http://www.google.com/(Search Now)</em> will be converted to
-<a href="http://www.google.com/">Search Now</a>.
-
-<h3>Moodle Module Links</h3>
-
-<p>If you know the Moodle id number (look for ?id=nn at the end of a module address) and
-the module name, you can link directly to that resource using the syntax:</p>
-
-<p>ModuleName:nn(Description Text)</p>
-<p>eg, <em>resource:36(My New Page)</em> <em>forum:10(Jump to forum)</em></p>
-
-<h3>Moodle Picture Links</h3>
-
-<p>Inline graphics can be placed on wiki pages. You need to upload the graphic and note its path within the file upload area. The syntax is:</p>
-
-<p>/<em>..path to file..</em>(alt text)</p>
-
-<p>for example, /mypics/graphic.jpg(Staff picture)</p>
-
-<h3>Automatic reformating</h3>
-
-<p>Many commonly used functions are converted into their XHTML equivalents automatically.. The main ones are as
-follows...</p>
-
-<ul>
- <li>HTTP links are converted into active links
- <li> ..., (R), (TM), (C), 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 are all converted to the correct character
- <li> digits x digits converts to correct multiply symbol
- <li>A line starting with at least four dashes is converted into a horizontal line
-</ul>
-
View
20 lang/el/help/workshop/addingacomment.html
@@ -1,20 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Adding a Comment</B></P>
-
-<P>Comments can be added to an assessment to:
-
-<OL>
-<LI>Add additional explaination or clarification to the assessment (by
- the student who assessed the piece of work);
-<LI>Query the statements made in the assessment (by the student whose
- piece of work is being assessed;
-<LI>Try to resolve difficulties which may have arisen during the discussion
- on the assessment (by the teacher);
-</OL>
-<P>The aim of the comments is to try either reach agreement on the
- current assessment or persuade the assessor to revise their assessment.
- This discussion should be undertaken in a reasonable way.
-
-<P>If the work is reassessed then the old comments are discarded and
- are no longer shown with the new assessment.
-
-</P>
View
35 lang/el/help/workshop/agreeassessments.html
@@ -1,35 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Agreement of Assessments</B></P>
-
-<P>A workshop assignment can have either of these characteristics:
-
-<OL>
-<LI>In the submission and assessment phase when the students see the
- assessments made by other students there is no feedback
- from the students who submitted the work to the students who made
- the assessment. There may be feedback from the teacher if the teacher
- choses to grade the student assessments and then the teacher's grades and
- comments will be available to both the student whose work it is and
- to the student who made the assessment. There will be, however,
- be only one way feedback between peers on any one piece of work.
-
-<LI>In the submission and assessment phase the students see the
- assessments made by other students and they are allowed to comment
- on these assessments. They may agree or disagree with the (peer) assessment.
- If they agree with the assessment then the assessment stands and is
- used in the final calculations when determining the peer grade given to
- the particular piece of work. If, however, they do not agree with an
- assessment the student who made the assessment is given an
- opportunity to revise it. The revise/disagree loop can continue until
- either agreement is reached or the deadline is reached. An assessment
- which is still in &quot;dispute&quot; when the deadline is reached
- is not used in the final calculations. This gives two way feedback
- between peers on each piece of work.
-</OL>
-<P>If the second method of working is chosen there is the option of switching off the display
- of grades. That is, if this &quot;hide grades&quot; option is exercised, only the comments
- in the assessment are shown to the student who work is being assessed.
- The grades are shown only after agreement has been reached (on the
- comments alone). Note that this option only effective when agreement on
- assessments is required.
-
-</P>
View
14 lang/el/help/workshop/anonymous.html
@@ -1,14 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Anonymous Grading</B></P>
-
-<P>A peer graded assignment can be graded anonymously. In this
- case the names (and any photos) of the students doing the grading
- are not shown. Only the (file) names of the submissions are used to identify
- the peices of work being graded.
-
-<P>When the peer graded assignment is not graded anonymously, the
- pieces of work are shown with the names (and any photos) of the
- students who submitted the work. This may lead to bias in the gradings.
-
-<P>Note that if the teacher's grades are shown to the students these are
- never shown anonymously.
-</P>
View
21 lang/el/help/workshop/assignmenttype.html
@@ -1,21 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Peer Graded Assignment Type</B></P>
-
-<P>A peer graded assignment can have one of two types:
-
-<OL>
-<LI>Only feedback on the assessment elements and the general comment
- is entered. The grading of assessment elements is not seen in the
- grading pages. Assignments themselves are not given an overall grade.
- However, the grading performance of the students is measured and
- this, and only this measure contributes towards the final grades given
- to the students.
-
-<LI>Here the teacher and peers are asked to provide both feedback and
- grades. The assignments are given an overall quantative grade as well
- as the qualative data. The final grade for a student will be calculated
- from the (weighted) contributions of the teacher's grade, the mean
- peers' grade and the student's grading performance.
-
-</OL>
-
-</P>
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23 lang/el/help/workshop/breakdownoffinalgrade.html
@@ -1,23 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>The Breakdown of the Final Grade</B></P>
-
-<P>The table on this screen shows your final grade and how it was calculated.
- The final grade is made up from three possible components.
-
-<OL>
-<LI>The teacher's grade for your submitted work.
-<LI>The average of the peer grades for your submitted work.
-<LI>A grade for your performance in the peer grading phase. This
- performance was based by (a) whether your grades were too high or too low
- when compared with the average grade of the other students (this is called bias),
- (b) whether your grades follow, again on average, the grades given by
- the other students (this is called reliability)
- and (c) on the quality of your comments on the other pieces of work you graded.
- This was graded by the teacher. These three performance grades were weighted
- by the factors 1:2:3 respectively to give an overall &quot;grading&quot;
- grade. In other words the teacher's grading of the comments is given the
- same weight as the Bias and Reliability factors combined.
-</OL>
-
-<P>These three components can be weighted as deemed appropriate for the
- assignment. These weights are shown in the smaller table.
-</P>
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54 lang/el/help/workshop/calculatingfinalgrade.html
@@ -1,54 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>The Calculation of the Final Grade</B></P>
-
-<P>The table on this screen shows how the the final grades for the students
- are calculated. The final grades are a weighted sum of up to five components.
-
-<OL>
-<LI>The teacher's grade for their submitted work. This is optional and will be
- used if the teacher actually assesses the student's work. If the student submits
- more than one peice of work the &quot;best&quot; grade is used. Here, best
- means the piece of work with the highest weighted combination of teacher's
- grade and peer grade...
-<LI>The average of the peer grades for their submitted work. Again if the student
- submits more than one peice of work the &quot;best&quot; grade is used. The
- peer grade can optionally
- include the teacher's grade. This grade would be included if the number of
- peer gradings is very low or it is thought that the peer gradings are suspect
- either because of bias (usually on the high side) or for not being reliable.
- If included the teacher's grade is treated in the same way as a peer grade in
- the calculation of the average.
-<LI>The student's bias in grading peer work. This is measure of whether the
- student grades work either too high or too low. It is not an absolute measure
- as it is based on the difference between the student's grade and the peer
- averages for each of the submissions they assessed. In general this component
- should NOT be given a high weighting.
-<LI>The student's reliability in grading peer work. This is a measure on how well
- a students grades follow the peer average for the peices of work they
- assessed. The measure discounts the student bias and averages the absolute
- differences between their grades and the peer average grades. In theory if
- the students gives high marks for good peices of work and low marks for poor
- pieces of work their reliability will be high. If it is suspected that the students in
- general are poor assessors then the teacher's grades should be included into
- the ppeer averages, this should make the reliability values more meaningful.
-<LI>The average grade given by the teacher for the student's assessments.
- This includes both the preliminary assessments made by the student on the
- example pieces of work and any grading the teacher makes on the asessments
- produced during the peer assessement phase of the assignment. In general this
- component is probably more important than both the Bias and Reliability
- components and thus, if available, should be weighted higher.
-</OL>
-
-<P>These five components can be weighted as deemed appropriate for the
- assignment. For example the teacher's grade might be weighted strongly
- if the peer grading part of the assignment is only considered a minor part
- of the assignment as a whole. Alternatively, if the teacher only grades a few
- of the submissions these grades can be ignored by giving them a zero weighting.
- If the assignment is all about the students as judges and the providing of feedback
- then first two components may be set to zero (or low) and the students'
- grading abilities will determine the final grades.
-
-<P>Note that this screen is used iteratively and the final grades are not normally
- made available to the students until the final phase of the assignment. Once the
- the teacher is happy with the final grades and their weightings then they can
- be made available to the students.
-</P>
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6 lang/el/help/workshop/editingacomment.html
@@ -1,6 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Editing a Comment</B></P>
-
-<P>As with other items there is a short period of time allowed when
- the text of comments can be amended. The comment is not shown
- on the assessment until this period has elapsed.
-</P>
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56 lang/el/help/workshop/elements.html
@@ -1,56 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Assignment Elements</B></P>
-
-<P>For ease of grading, a Workshop Assignment should have a reasonable
- number of &quot;Assessment Elements&quot;. Each element should cover
- a particular aspect of the assignment. Typically an assignment will have
- something between 5 to 15 elements for comments and grading, the
- actual number depending on the size and complexity of the assignment. A peer
- assignment with only one element is allowed and has a similar assessment
- strategy to the standard Moodle Assignment.
-
-<P>The type of elements dependent of the assignment's grading strategy.
-
-<P><B>Not Graded.</B> The elements are descriptions of aspects of the assignment.
- The assessor is asked to comment on each of these aspects. As with all the grading
- strategies, there is also an area for general comments.
-
-
-<P><B>Accumulative Grading.</B> The elements have the following three features:
-<OL>
-<LI>The DESCRIPTION of the assessment element. This should clearly state what
- aspect of the assignment is being assessed. If the assessment is qualatative
- it is helpful to give details of what is considered excellent, average
- and poor.
-
-<LI>The SCALE of the assessment element. There are a number of prefined
- scales. These range from simple Yes/No scales, through multipoint scales to
- a full percentage scale. Each element has its own scale which should be choosen
- to fit the number of possible variations for that element. Note that the scale
- does NOT determine the element's importance when calculating the overall
- grade, a two point scale has the same &quot;influence&quot; as a 100 point
- scale if the respective elements have the same weight...
-
-<LI>The WEIGHT of the assessment element. By default the elements are given the same
- importance when calculating the overall grade of the assignment. This can be
- changed by giving the more importance elements a weight greater than one, and
- the less important elements a weight below one. Changing the weights does NOT
- effect the maximum grade, that value is fixed by the Maximum Grade parameter
- of the peer assignment. Weights can be assigned negative values, this is an
- experimental feature.
-</OL>
-<P><B>Error Banded Grading.</B> The elements will normally describe certain items
- or aspects which must be present in the assignment. The assessment is made on the
- present or absence of these items or aspects. The teacher must all set of grade table which
- give the suggested grades when all the items are present, when one is absent, when two are
- absent, etc. If certain items are more important than others then those items can be given
- a weighting greater than one. Minor items can be given a weighting less than one. The
- overall &quot;error count&quot; is a weighted sum of the missing items. The assessor
- can always make a minor adjustment to these suggested grades.
-
-<P><B>Criteria Grading.</B> The elements will give a set of &quot;level&quot; statements
-which can be used to rank the assignment. The statements may be cumulative or they may
-each be self contained. The assessor must decide which statement best fits each piece of
-work. The teacher must also relate each criterion statement with a suggested grade. These
-should normally be in order. The assessor can make a minor adjustment to these
-suggested grades.
-</P>
View
21 lang/el/help/workshop/finalgrades.html
@@ -1,21 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>The Final Grades</B></P>
-
-<P>The table on this screen lists the final grades and their breakdown as shown to
- the students. If there are missing values in the table then it is possible to &quot;go back&quot;
- and add these. In fact, there are two adjustments which can be made to the Final Grades.
-
-<OL>
-<LI>If a teacher's grade needs to be added then the piece of work can be
- graded by going
- to the teacher's Management screen for assignment and clicking on the link &quot;Student
- Submissions for Assessment&quot;. Any otherstanding submissions can be graded. Once this has
- been done then move the assignment back to Phase 3 and re-calculate the Final grades. In a
- similar way any assessments which have not been graded can be graded from the Management
- screen.
-<LI>If it is desired to use a different weighting scheme then the assignment should be moved
- back to Phase 3 and link &quot;Calculate Final Grades&quot; can be clicked and the new
- weights entered. After the grades have been re-calcualted the assignment should be moved
- to Phase 4 to make the new grades available.
-</OL>
-
-</P>
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14 lang/el/help/workshop/graded.html
@@ -1,14 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>A Graded Peer Assignment</B></P>
-
-<P>This shows the grades and comments made on the submitted piece of
- work. You can if you wish reply to this assessment and choose not to
- accept it (at this stage). If that is the case, please enter your reply in the
- box at the foot of the page giving the reason why you are not happy with
- the assessment. Then click on the button at the foot of the page and
- choose NO when asked whether you are happy with this assessment.
-
-<P>If, on the other hand. you are happy with the assessment simply
- click on the button at the foot of the page and then click on YES when
- asked whether you are happy with this assessment.
-
-</P>
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32 lang/el/help/workshop/grading.html
@@ -1,32 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Grading of Peer Assignments</B></P>
-
-<P>For ease of grading a Peer Assignment is divided into a number of
- assessment &quot;elements&quot;. Each element covers
- a particular aspect of the assignment. Depending on the type of assessment,
- for each element you should
-<OL>
-<LI>Enter a Grade by clicking in the appropriate button or selecting an appropriate
- number from the drop down menu.
-
-<LI>Enter an explaination of why you gave that grade in the Feedback box. If
- you feel that the reason is obvious then leave the box empty. Note, however,
- that the teacher may look at your assessment and may well query a grade
- if there is no explaination.
-</OL>
-
-<P>In other type of asessments, you are asked to determine if various items
- are present or absent, in others you are asked to choose which statement best
- fits the peice of work. In both of these assignments you can adjust the grade
- somewhat as you see fit.
-
-<P>The last box on this form allows you to make a general comment on the
- work. This should justify your assessment. It should be polite and as far as
- possible constructive. Your assessment will be shown to the student who
- produced the piece of work.
-
-<P>You have a limited period of time, typically half an hour, in which to
- change your mind and alter your grades or comments. Once that period
- is over the person whose work you are assessing is notified about the assessment.
- At that stage you can view your assessment but you cannot change it.
-
-</P>
View
20 lang/el/help/workshop/gradingassessments.html
@@ -1,20 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Grading the Student Assessments</B></P>
-
-<P>This screen is used to enter the teacher's grade for the assessment made
- by the student during the submission and assessment phase of the assignment. A relatively
- simple grading is used, the score out of 20. The treacher can decide what is
- being graded and the relative scores from the instructions given to the students
- before the assignment started. For example, at a higher level the students may be
- required to give critical comments, at an intermediate level the students may be
- required to point out strengths and weaknesses, and at a lower level the students
- may be simply pointing out errors and inaccuracies.
-
-<P>If available the Teacher's own assessment is shown before that of the
- student so an easy comparison can be made. The teacher's own
- comments can act as a kind of benchmark.
-
-<P>The grades of assessment is
- saved by clicking on the apprpriate button at the foot of the page. There is a
- chance to repeat the grading within the &quot;editing&quot; period. Once that
- time has elapsed the grade is made available to the student.
-</P>
View
73 lang/el/help/workshop/gradingstrategy.html
@@ -1,73 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Grading Strategy</B></P>
-
-<P>A workshop assignment is quite flexible in the type of grading scheme used. This can be:
-
-<OL>
-<LI><B>No grading:</B> In this type of assignment the teacher is not
- interested in quantative assessment from the students at all. The students
- make comments of the pieces of works but not grade them. The teacher,
- however, can, if desired, grade the student comments. These
- &quot;grading grades&quot; form the basis of the students' final grades.
- If the teacher does not grade the student assessments then the assignment
- does not have any final grades.
-
-<LI><B>Accumulative grading:</B> This is the default type of grading.
- In this type of assignment the grade of each
- assessment is made up of a number of &quot;assessment elements&quot;.
- Each element should cover
- a particular aspect of the assignment. Typically an assignment will have
- something between 5 to 15 elements for comments and grading, the
- actual number depending on the size and complexity of the assignment. A peer
- assignment with only one element is allowed and has a similar assessment
- strategy to the standard Moodle Assignment.
-
-<P>Elements have the following three features:
-<OL>
-<LI>The DESCRIPTION of the assessment element. This should clearly state what
- aspect of the assignment is being assessed. If the assessment is qualatative
- it is helpful to give details of what is considered excellent, average
- and poor.
-
-<LI>The SCALE of the assessment element. There are a number of prefined
- scales. These range from simple Yes/No scales, through multipoint scales to
- a full percentage scale. Each element has its own scale which should be choosen
- to fit the number of possible variations for that element. Note that the scale
- does NOT determine the element's importance when calculating the overall
- grade, a two point scale has the same &quot;influence&quot; as a 100 point
- scale if the respective elements have the same weight...
-
-<LI>The WEIGHT of the assessment element. By default the elements are given the same
- importance when calculating the overall grade of the assignment. This can be
- changed by giving the more importance elements a weight greater than one, and
- the less important elements a weight below one. Changing the weights does NOT
- effect the maximum grade, that value is fixed by the Maximum Grade parameter
- of the peer assignment. Weights can be assigned negative values, this is an
- experimental feature.
-</OL>
-
-<LI><B>Error Banded Grading:</B> In this type of assignment the submissions are
- graded on a set of Yes/No scales. The grade is determined by the &quot;Grade
- Table &quot; which gives the relationship between the number of
- &quot;errors&quot; and the suggested grade. For example an assignment may have six
- significant items which should be present, the Grade Table will give suggested
- grades if all are present, one is absent, if two are absent, etc. The individual
- items can, if desired, be given weighting factors if some items are more important
- than others. The number of &quot;errors&quot; is a weighted sum of the items not
- present. By default each item is given a weight of one. The grading table is likely
- to be non-linear, for example
- the sugested grades may be 90%, 70%, 50%, 40%, 30%, 20%, 10%, 0%, 0%, 0% for
- an assignment with 10 items.The assessor can adjust the suggested grade by up
- to 20% either way to give the submission's final grade.
-
-<LI><B>Criteria Grading:</B> This is simpliest type of assessment to grade (although
- not necessarily the most straightforward to set up). The submissions are
- graded against a set of criteria statments. The assessor choses which statement
- best fits the piece of work. The grade is determined by a &quot;Criteria
- Table&quot; which gives the suggested grade for each criterion. For example
- an assignment may be set up with, say, five criteria statements and the assessors
- must then choose one of the five statements for each of their assessments. As with
- the Banded assignment the assessor can adjust the suggested grade by up to
- 20% to give the final grade.
-</OL>
-
-</P>
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13 lang/el/help/workshop/includeself.html
@@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Including Self in the Assignment</B></P>
-
-<P>A peer graded assignment can optionally include the student's own work
- in the set of pieces each student is asked to grade. This will mean that if, say, the
- number of peer assessors is 5, then each student will be asked to grade 6
- pieces of work, one of them being their own work.
-
-<P>If the number of peer assessors is set to zero and the include self option
- is turned on then the assignment becomes a self-graded assignment. This
- may or may not include the teacher's grading depending on whether that
- option is set or not.
-
-</P>
View
58 lang/el/help/workshop/managing.html
@@ -1,58 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Managing a Workshop Assignment</B></P>
-
-<P>A Workshop Assignment is more complex than an ordinary assignment.
- It involves a number of steps or phases. These are
-<OL>
-<LI>The assessment of the assignment should be broken into a number
- of assessment ELEMENTS. This makes the grading of an assignment less
- arbitary and gives the students a framework on which to make assessments.
- The teacher has the role of setting up the assessment elements thus making a
- grading sheet. (See that page for more details.)
-
- <P>With the assessment elements set up the teacher will normally submit a
- small number of example pieces of work. These are practice pieces for the
- students to assess before preparing their own pieces of work. However,
- before the assignment is made available to students, these example
- pieces should be assessed by the teacher. This provides the students
- with not only examples for the assignment but also specimen assessments
- on those examples.
- <P>The submission of example pieces of work by the teacher is optional
- and for certain assignments may not be appropriate.
-
-<LI>The assignment is now opened to the students. If the teacher has set up
- example pieces of work the students can be asked to assess a number of these.
- In this case, the teacher must grade these assessments and the students must
- reach a satisfactory standard before they are allowed submit their own work.
- Here, a &quot;satisfactory standard&quot; has been set at 40%. Once a student
- has &quot;passed&quot; the required number of assessments they are free to
- submit their own work.
- <P>When a student submits a piece of work the teacher can, if desired assess that
- work. This assessment can be incorporated into the student final grade. These
- assessments, if they are required, can take place either during the submission
- phase of the assignment or after the submission deadline.
- <P>If the assignment incorporates peer assessment, students who have submitted
- work are shown other students' work to assess. When they have made an assessment
- their peer can see that assessment (but the other student cannot comment on it.)
- The teacher, however, can, if desired, grade the assessment and that score is taken
- forward towards the student's final grade.
-
-<LI>After the deadline has passed, the teacher moves the assignment to the next phase
- where further submissions and assessments by students are not allowed. The teacher
- can, if wished, grade the peer assessments made by the students. This is not really
- necessary as provided a reason number of assessments have been made on each
- submission the &quot;grading performance&quot; of each student can be
- determined from the relative scores. The teacher now calculates the final grades
- of the students. These final grades are normally made up of three components,
- teacher's grade of the student's work, mean peer grade of the student's work
- and the student's grading performance. The last can include the mean &quot;grading
- grade&quot; entered by the teacher against a student's comments. These three
- components are given weights by the teacher before the calculation of the final
- grades takes place.
-
-<LI>The final phase of the assignment is entered to allow the students to see their
- final grades. The teacher can, be desired, backtrack the assignment to allow some
- adjustment of, say, the weights used in the final grade calculation, the revised
- grades can then be shown to the students.
-</OL>
-
-</P>
View
13 lang/el/help/workshop/nassessmentsofstudentsubmissions.html
@@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Number of Assessments of Student submissions</B></P>
-
-<P>This number determines whether the students are asked to peer assess
- other students' work. If it is
- not zero then each student is offered that number of pieces
- of work from other students. After assessment the originator of the work
- can view the comments and possibly the grade given by their peer.
- (The peer assessment process may be iterative depending on the setting of
- &quot;Agree Assessments&quot; option.) The teacher can also,
- if desired, grade these assessments and those grades can be used in the calculation of
- the final marks. The student is shown the teacher's comments and grade
- for each of their assessments if available.
-</P>
View
10 lang/el/help/workshop/nassessmentsofteachersexamples.html
@@ -1,10 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Number of Assessments of Teacher's Examples</B></P>
-
-<P>This number determines whether the students are asked to assess
- any example peices of work before submitting their own work. If it is
- not zero then each student must assess that number of example pieces
- of work to a satisfactory level. This means that the teacher must grade
- these assessments before the student can submit work. The student is
- shown the teacher's comments and grade for each of their
- assessments.
-</P>
View
15 lang/el/help/workshop/nelements.html
@@ -1,15 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Number of Comments, Elements, Bands or Criteria</B></P>
-
-<P>The number entered here determines how many items will be used in
- the assessments. Depending on the type of grading strategy, this number
- gives the number of comments, assessments elements, bands or criteria
- to be used in the assessments. Typically an assignment will have
- something between 5 to 15 assessment items, the
- actual number depending on the size and complexity of the assignment.
-
-<P>All assessments have a General Comments field. For a &quot;No
- Grading&quot; assignment the value given here determines the
- number of additional comment areas. It can be specified as zero and results
- in the assessment having only a single General Comments area.
-
-</P>
View
30 lang/el/help/workshop/numberofassessors.html
@@ -1,30 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Number of Peer Assessors</B></P>
-
-<P>A peer graded assignment will normally have around 3 to 8 peer
- assessors. That is, in the peer grading phase, each student will be
- asked to grade this number of pieces of work from the other students
- in the class. The larger the assignment is, in terms of content, the
- smaller this number should be, else the grading burden on the
- students becomes onerous. However, each student should see sufficient
- examples to gain an insight into what constitutes a good piece of work
- and a poor piece of work. Further for the grading performance of a
- student to be assessed meaningfully the greater the number of peer
- gradings the better. This performance is unlikely to be valid if only three
- or four gradings are done by each student.
-
-<P>Provided there is enough pieces of work submitted (actually 10 or
- more), the system will allocate each student at least one &quot;good&quot; and
- at least one &quot;poor&quot; piece of work. However, this can only be done if the
- teacher has graded the pieces of work BEORE the allocation of (peer) grading
- work is done. The teacher does NOT, however, have to grade all the
- pieces of work, a sample is sufficient. Further, the teacher's gradings need
- NOT be the final gradings, a preliminary grading is good enough. Note,
- however, that if the option to show teacher's gradings is turned on,
- these gradings will be shown to the students at the end of the submission
- phase.
-
-<P>The number of peer assesors can be zero. In which case the assignment
- becomes either a self-graded assignment if that option is turned on, or
- a normal teacher-graded assignment.
-
-</P>
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19 lang/el/help/workshop/resubmit.html
@@ -1,19 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Resubmitting assignments</B></P>
-
-<P>By default, students cannot resubmit assignments, they are allowed only one submission.</P>
-
-<P>If you turn this option on, then students will be allowed to submit more than one piece of work
- to this assignment. This may be useful if the teacher wants to encourage students to do better
- work by an iterative process.</P>
-
-<P>The assessment of submissions is allocated on the basis of the number of assessments a piece
- of work has had. Thus new submissions from a student are likely to be candidates for peer
- assessment. However, if a student resubmits a number of pieces of work in quick succession then
- they are all equally likely to be assessed. The assignment does NOT give priority to the newest
- submission.
-
-<P>When the student's final grade is calculated the submission with the highest grade is used. Here
- highest grade means the weighted combination of the teacher's grade and the peer grade if
- both are available.
-
-</P>
View
12 lang/el/help/workshop/selfassessment.html
@@ -1,12 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Self Assessment</B></P>
-
-<P>A workshop assignment can optionally include the student's own work
- in the set of pieces each student is asked to assess. This will mean that if, say, the
- number of student pieces of work each student has to assess is set at 5, then
- each student will be asked to assess 6 pieces of work, one of them being their own work.
-
-<P>If the number of student pieces of work is set to zero and the self assessment option
- is turned on then the assignment becomes a self-graded assignment. This
- may or may not include the teacher's grading depending on the teacher's decision.
-
-</P>
View
15 lang/el/help/workshop/showinggrades.html
@@ -1,15 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Hiding the Display of Grades</B></P>
-
-<P>This option can be used in a workshop assignment where there
- must be agreement between the students on each assessment .
- The default value is to show the student whose work is being
- assessed both the comments and the grades in the peer assessments. This
- may lead to more disputes than when the option is turned on and the
- assessments are shown without the grades.
-
-<P>If the option is taken to hide grades in the peer assessments the
- grades are revealed once agreement has been reached. This agreement
- will, of course, have been made only on the comments. If these comments
- do not reasonably match the grades then the student whose work is being
- assessed may well appeal to the teacher.
-</P>
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11 lang/el/help/workshop/specimen.html
@@ -1,11 +0,0 @@
-<p align="center"><b>Specimen Assessment Form</b></p>
-
-<p>This page shows shows the details of the actual form used to grade
- your assignment. It will be used by the teacher to grade your work. Further,
- in a peer graded asignment, the same form will be used by yourself and
- your fellow students to grade the submitted pieces of work.</p>
-
-<p>Please note that although you can change the grades on
- this form these changes are NOT saved. This is simply a specimen form,
- but a very similar form will be used by the teacher and possibly by you
- during this assignment.</p>
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13 lang/el/help/workshop/teachersgradings.html
@@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Display of Teacher's Grades</B></P>
-
-<P>A peer graded assignment can optionally make the teacher's comments
- and grades available to the student's. If desired, these are shown after the
- submission deadline, or later if the grades are not available then. The teacher's
- comments and grades may well help the students when making their own
- (peer) assessments on other student's work.
-
-<P>Note that even when the peer grading is done anonymously, the
- teacher's grades are always shown to the students with the teacher's
- name and, if available, their photo.
-
-</P>

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