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13 lang/et/help/cookies.html
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1   -<p align="center"><b>Cookies</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>Two cookies are used by this site.</p>
4   -
5   -<p>The essential one is the session cookie, usually called <b>MoodleSession</b>. You must allow this cookie
6   - into your browser to provide continuity and maintain your login from page to page. When you log out or
7   - close the browser this cookie is destroyed (in your browser and on the server).</p>
8   -
9   -<p>The other cookie is purely for convenience, usually called something like <b>MOODLEID</b>. It just remembers
10   - your username within the browser. This means when you return to this site the username field on the
11   - login page will be already filled out for you. It is safe to refuse this cookie - you will just have
12   - to retype your username every time you log in.</p>
13   -
11 lang/et/help/courseavailability.html
... ... @@ -1,11 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Course availability</b></p>
2   -
3   -<P>This option allows you to "hide" your course
4   - completely.</p>
5   -
6   -<p>It will not appear on any course listings, except to
7   - teachers of the course and administrators.</p>
8   -
9   -<p>Even if students try to access the course URL directly,
10   - they will not be allowed to enter.</p>
11   -
14 lang/et/help/coursegrades.html
... ... @@ -1,14 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Grades</b></p>
2   -
3   -<P>Many of the activities allow grades to be set.</p>
4   -
5   -<p>By default, the results of all grades within the
6   - course can be seen in the Grades page, available
7   - from the main course page.</p>
8   -
9   -<p>If a teacher is not interested in using grades in a
10   - course, or just wants to hide grades from students,
11   - then they can disable the display of grades in the
12   - Course Settings. This does not prevent individual
13   - activities from using or setting grades, it just
14   - disables the results being displayed to students.</p>
11 lang/et/help/resource/resourcetype.html
... ... @@ -1,12 +1,5 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Resource Type</B></P>
2   -
3   -<P>Resources are any content you can dream up. These are the
4   - different types, which mostly specify how the content is
5   - to be accessed:
6   -
7   -<font size="2" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>Ressurside t&uuml;&uuml;bid
8   -</strong>
9   -</font><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><p><font size="2">Ressursidel v&otilde;ib olla mistahes sisu. Nende erinevad t&uuml;&uuml;bid
  1 +<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Ressurside t&uuml;&uuml;bid</b></p>
  2 +<p>Ressursidel v&otilde;ib olla mistahes sisu. Nende erinevad t&uuml;&uuml;bid
10 3 m&auml;&auml;ravad enamasti &auml;ra, kuidas sisule juurde p&auml;&auml;seb.<br>
11 4 <br>
12 5 <strong>Lihttekst </strong>&#8211; k&otilde;ige tavalisem t&uuml;&uuml;p. V&otilde;id
99 lang/ro/help/surveys.html
... ... @@ -1,99 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Available surveys</B></P>
2   -
3   -<P>Currently, Moodle only offers specific types of surveys (future versions
4   -will enable you to create your own).</P>
5   -
6   -<P>The available surveys have been chosen as being particularly useful for
7   -evaluating online learning environments that use a constructivist pedagogy.
8   -They are useful to identify certain trends that may be happening among
9   -your participants.
10   -
11   -(To see a paper where these are used in a detailed analysis, see:
12   -<A TARGET=paper HREF="http://dougiamas.com/writing/herdsa2002">http://dougiamas.com/writing/herdsa2002</A>)</P>
13   -
14   -<HR>
15   -<P><B>COLLES - Constructivist On-Line Learning Environment Survey</B></P>
16   -<UL>
17   - <p>The COLLES comprises an economical 24 statements grouped into six scales,
18   - each of which helps us address a key question about the quality of the on-line
19   - learning environment: </p>
20   -
21   -<table BORDER="0" CELLSPACING="10" CELLPADDING="10">
22   - <tr>
23   - <td valign=top>Relevance</td>
24   - <td>How relevant is on-line learning to students' professional practices?
25   - </td>
26   - </tr>
27   - <tr>
28   - <td valign=top>Reflection </td>
29   -
30   - <td>Does on-line learning stimulate students' critical reflective thinking?
31   - </td>
32   - </tr>
33   - <tr>
34   - <td valign=top>Interactivity </td>
35   - <td>To what extent do students engage on-line in rich educative dialogue?
36   - </td>
37   - </tr>
38   - <tr>
39   - <td valign=top>Tutor Support</td>
40   -
41   - <td>How well do tutors enable students to participate in on-line learning?
42   - </td>
43   - </tr>
44   - <tr>
45   - <td valign=top>Peer Support </td>
46   - <td>Is sensitive and encouraging support provided on-line by fellow students?
47   - </td>
48   - </tr>
49   - <tr>
50   - <td valign=top>Interpretation </td>
51   -
52   - <td>Do students and tutors make good sense of each other's on-line communications?</td>
53   - </tr>
54   -</table>
55   -
56   - <p>Underpinning the dynamic view of learning is a new theory of knowing: social
57   - constructivism, which portrays the learner as an active conceptualiser within
58   - a socially interactive learning environment. Social constructivism is an epistemology,
59   - or way of knowing, in which learners collaborate reflectively to co-construct
60   - new understandings, especially in the context of mutual inquiry grounded in
61   - their personal experience. </p>
62   -
63   - <p>Central to this collaboration is the development of students' communicative
64   - competence, that is, the ability to engage in open and critical discourse
65   - with both the teacher and peers. This discourse is characterised by an empathic
66   - orientation to constructing reciprocal understanding, and a critical attitude
67   - towards examining underlying assumptions. </p>
68   -
69   - <p>The COLLES has been designed to enable you
70   - to monitor the extent to which you are able to exploit the interactive capacity
71   - of the World Wide Web for engaging students in dynamic learning practices. </p>
72   -
73   -<P>
74   -(This information has been adapted from the COLLES page. You can find out more about
75   -COLLES and the authors of it at:
76   -<A TARGET=paper HREF="http://surveylearning.com/colles/">http://surveylearning.com/colles/</A>)</P>
77   -</UL>
78   -
79   -
80   -<HR>
81   -<P><B>ATTLS - Attitudes to Thinking and Learning Survey</B></P>
82   -<UL>
83   -
84   -<P>The theory of 'ways of knowing', originally from the field of gender research (Belenky et al., 1986) provides us with a survey tool to examine the quality of discourse within a collaborative environment.
85   -
86   -<P>The Attitudes Towards Thinking and Learning Survey (ATTLS) is an instrument developed by Galotti et al. (1999) to measure the extent to which a person is a 'connected knower' (CK) or a 'separate knower' (SK).
87   -
88   -<P>People with higher CK scores tend to find learning more enjoyable, and are often more cooperative, congenial and more willing to build on the ideas of others, while those with higher SK scores tend to take a more critical and argumentative stance to learning.
89   -
90   -<P>Studies have shown that these two learning styles are independent of each other (Galotti et al., 1999; Galotti et al., 2001). Additionally, they are only a reflection of learning attitudes, not learning capacities or intellectual power.
91   -
92   -<P><I>Belenky, M. F., Clinchy, B. M., Goldberger, N. R., & Tarule, J. M. (1986). Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind. New York: Basic Books, Inc. </I></P>
93   -
94   -<P><I>Galotti, K. M., Clinchy, B. M., Ainsworth, K., Lavin, B., & Mansfield, A. F. (1999). A New Way of Assessing Ways of Knowing: The Attitudes Towards Thinking and Learning Survey (ATTLS). Sex Roles, 40(9/10), 745-766.</I></P>
95   -
96   -<P><I>Galotti, K. M., Reimer, R. L., & Drebus, D. W. (2001). Ways of knowing as learning styles: Learning MAGIC with a partner. Sex Roles, 44(7/8), 419-436.</I></P>
97   -
98   -
99   -</UL>
22 lang/ro/help/teachers.html
... ... @@ -1,22 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Teachers</B></P>
2   -
3   -<P>This page shows the list of people who are assigned to be
4   - "teachers" in this course (by the system administrator).
5   -
6   -<P>You can use this form to assign a role (title) to each person
7   - such as "Professor", "Tutor", "Assistant" and so on. These
8   - will appear on the site's course listing and also on the
9   - list of participants for your course. If you leave the
10   - role empty then the default word for teacher will be used
11   - (the one you set in the Course Settings page).
12   -
13   -<P>You can also order this list (to put the main teacher at the
14   - top, for example). Simply select numbers from the menus
15   - in the "Order" column. After pressing "Save changes" you will
16   - see the new order.
17   -
18   -<P><B>NOTE:</B> A special case occurs if you use select "Hide"
19   - for a teacher. In this case, the teacher will
20   - NOT BE SHOWN on the course listings or the list of
21   - participants. They will be "hidden" from students
22   - (unless they post messages to the forums etc)
85 lang/sv/help/quiz/formatctm.html
... ... @@ -1,85 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Att importera filer av typen "Testhanterare f&ouml;r kursen"</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>
4   -
5   -Course Test Manager is an "End of Lifetime" software package from Course Technology.
6   -It is no longer being actively developed by Course Technology. It has been replaced by
7   -a new test manager called ExamView. However, there has never been a migration path to allow
8   -this format to be exported from CTM testbanks to any other common test format. This is why this
9   -module has been written.</p>
10   -
11   -<p> In order to import questions from CTM, you must have CTM installed on a Windows machine, and
12   -have access to the MS Access data files on that machine. Two data files are required in order to
13   -access the data files:</p>
14   -<ul><li>System.mda - This file is in the top directory of your CTM installation, and is referred to
15   -in MS access parlance as the "System Database".</li>
16   -<li>ctm.mdb - this is the database that contains the test bank questions. There is one of these databases
17   -for each course installed in CTM. It is located in a directory one level bellow your CTM installation
18   -directory.</li>
19   -</ul>
20   -
21   -</p>The import process is somewhat different based on whether you're running moodle on Windows or Linux.
22   -Regardless of what platfom moodle is running on, you must have a Windows system (Windows 2000 or Windows XP)
23   -on the same network as your moodle system in order to host the Access database while importing test banks.</p>
24   -
25   -<p>The process is somewhat easier on a <b>Windows-based</b> moodle system. All you need to do to use the CTM import
26   -class is:</p>
27   -
28   -<ol><li>upload the system.mda system database to moodle using the file manager. It doesn't matter what course you
29   -upload the system.mda file to. Moodle will find it regardless.</li>
30   -<li>Crete your quiz and go into the "import questions from file" process. Upload your chosen ctm.mdb
31   -database as the file to import. If you did this correctly, you will see another screen that allows you
32   -to choose the sub-category of questions to import from the database. The reason this step is here is that
33   -CTM test banks often contain a large number of categorized questions, based on the chapters of the book or
34   -sections of the course.</li>
35   -</ol>
36   -
37   -<p>The process on a <b>Linux-based</b> moodle system includes a third-party software component called the
38   -<a href="http://odbcsock.sourceforge.net/" target="_new"><b>ODBC Socket Server</b></a>. In order to import CTM databases on Linux, you must first download and install
39   -this small network program on the Windows system that hosts your CTM databases. <b>Do not</b> follow the installation
40   -steps outlined in the ODBC Socket Server Installation. They're more complicated than they need to be!
41   -Instead, follow these steps to install this program on your Windows system:</P>
42   -
43   -<ol><li>Go to the windows system and unzip the install file you downloaded from
44   -<a href="http://odbcsock.sourceforge.net/" target="_new">this site</a> on the system.</li>
45   -<li>Copy the binary ODBCSocketServer.exe to a permanent location, such as your system directory
46   -(probably C:\WINNT\ or C:\Windows) or your Program Files directory. </li>
47   -
48   -<li>Install the ODBC Socket Server as a Service on the system with this command:<br />
49   -<b>&lt;path you copied the file to in the step above&gt;ODBCSocketServer.exe /Service</b><br />
50   -You may do this by typing this command from Start-&gt;Run... dialog, or from a command prompt.</li>
51   -
52   -<li>Open the Service Manager by either going to
53   -Start-&gt;Settings-&gt;Control Panels-&gt;Administrative Tools-&gt;Services or by right-clicking on
54   -<b>My Computer</b>, choosing <b>Manage</b>, then choosing <B>Services and Applications-&gt;Services</b> from
55   -the right panel. You may also access the Service manager by typing <b>services.msc</b> in the Start-&gt;Run...
56   -dialog</li>
57   -
58   -<li>In the Service manager, right-click the ODBC Socket Server item and choose the <b>Start</b> item. It's status
59   -should change to "started" when you do this. Note that you may stop and/or disable this service completely after
60   -you've completed the import process.</li>
61   -
62   -<li>Make sure that the system.mda and ctm.mdb access data files are on the machine,
63   -and that the MS Access ODBC driver is present. It is installed in a standard Windows installation. You can
64   -determine if it installed by opening the "Data Sources" item in "Administrative Tools" and referring to the "Drivers"
65   -tab. You're going to have to determine where CTM is installed and locate the system.mda file and the ctm.mdb database
66   -or databases you're interested in importing data from. Make note of the full local paths to these files as well
67   -as the IP address or hostname of the Windows server. You're going to need this information for the import process.</li>
68   -
69   -<li>Now you may import the testbank or testbanks into moodle. Crete your quiz and go into the
70   -"import questions from file" process. <B>NOW HERE'S WHERE THINGS ARE DIFFERENT FOR LINUX - </B>
71   -YOU MUST SPECIFY A DUMMY FILE IN THE UPLOAD FIELD TO GET THE IMPORT PROCESS STARTED. THIS FILE <b>WILL NOT</b>
72   -BE PROCESSED, IT'S JUST A PLACEHOLDER FOR THE IMPORT FORM. YOU WILL GET A PLACE TO SPECIFY THE WINDOWS SERVER
73   -INFORMATION NEXT. Next, you will get a screen where you can type in the hostname for the Windows ODBC Socket Server
74   -machine as well as the paths to the system and testbank databases. Type in the information you wrote down from the
75   -previous step here and click "Connect to Server". If everything was set up correctly, you'll get another form to allow
76   -you to choose the sub-category of questions to import from the database. The reason this step is here is that
77   -CTM test banks often contain a large number of categorized questions, based on the chapters of the book or
78   -sections of the course. IF YOU GET TO THIS STEP WITHOUT ERROR MESSAGES, YOU HAVE SET UP THE SOCKET SERVER CORRECTLY
79   -AND YOU'RE ABOUT TO IMPORT QUESTIONS TO MOODLE!</li>
80   -</ol>
81   -
82   -<P>If you received error messages during this process, you may find this technical information useful.
83   -The ODBC Socket server uses port 9628 to open a socket and trade and XML query for an XML result table of
84   -the query results. The import class parses that XML and use it just like I use a local query to do the importing.
85   -</p>
7 lang/th/help/assignment/mods.html
... ... @@ -1,7 +0,0 @@
1   -<P><IMG VALIGN=absmiddle SRC="<?php echo $CFG->wwwroot?>/mod/assignment/icon.gif">&nbsp;<B>Assignments</B></P>
2   -<UL>
3   -<P>Assignments allow the teacher to specify a task that requires students
4   - to prepare digital content (any format) and submit it by uploading it
5   - to the server. Typical assignments include essays, projects, reports
6   - and so on. This module includes grading facilities.</P>
7   -</UL>
8 lang/th/help/attendance/autoattend.html
... ... @@ -1,8 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Automatic Attendance Logging</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>When this option is turned on, the attendance instance will be populated automatically based on the activity of each user on the day specified by the date. </p>
4   -
5   -<p>The automatic attendance logging facility counts a participant as present if they log into the course and perform any activities whatsoever on the specified date.</p>
6   -
7   -<p>The moodle cron facility must be configured in order for this feature to work.</p>
8   -
5 lang/th/help/attendance/choosedays.html
... ... @@ -1,5 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Days of Each Week to Take Attendance.</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>When adding multiple attendance rolls, one attendance roll will be created for each weekday checked in this list. For example, if you want to take attendance every Tuesday and Thursday, only check the Tue. and Thu. boxes and leave the rest unchecked.</p>
4   -
5   -
6 lang/th/help/attendance/dynsection.html
... ... @@ -1,6 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Determine Section for Attendance Based on This Date.</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>Automatically move this instance to the section that corresponds to its date. If you choose this option the instance will move itself to the appropriate week after you save the changes.</p>
4   -
5   -<p>This option only applies to courses with a weekly format.</p>
6   -
6 lang/th/help/attendance/grade.html
... ... @@ -1,6 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Grading a roll.</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>This feature allows a roll to be graded on a linear scale. The percentage of the total number of hours in a course a student is present for is added as a grade in the gradebook. Tardies are included in this calculation as well, and are graded based on the "number of tardies per absence" configuration for the module.</p>
4   -
5   -<p>This feature does not work very well when automatic attendance is turned on because there is currently no way for a student to be partially present in a course on a given day. A student is 100% present or 100% absent in terms of automatic attendance logging.</p>
6   -
6 lang/th/help/attendance/hours.html
... ... @@ -1,6 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Number of Hours in a Class Period</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>Sets how many hours this class period will have. Attendance is logged individually for each hour of class. There is no way to specify partial hours.</p>
4   -
5   -<p>This option doesn't really have a lot of bearing on automatic attendance logging.</p>
6   -
5 lang/th/help/attendance/maxgrade.html
... ... @@ -1,5 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Maximum Grade Value for Attendance</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>This value determines what the maximum number grade is for full attendance in a course. This value is pro-rated on a linear scale for partial attendance. A grade of zero is logged for full absence.</p>
4   -
5   -
5 lang/th/help/attendance/mods.html
... ... @@ -1,5 +0,0 @@
1   -<p><img valign="absmiddle" src="<?php echo $CFG->wwwroot?>/mod/attendance/icon.gif">&nbsp;<b>Attendance</b></p>
2   -<ul>
3   -<p>This module allows you to record the attendance of each participant in an on-site or on-line class session. Attendance can be logged manually by any teacher in the course, or automatically based on participant activity within the twenty-four hour period of the attendance date.</p>
4   -</ul>
5   -
26 lang/th/help/chat/chatting.html
... ... @@ -1,26 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Using Chat</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>The chat module contains some features to make chatting a little nicer.</p>
4   -
5   -<dl>
6   -<dt><b>Smilies</b></dt>
7   -<dd>Any smiley faces (emoticons) that you can type elsewhere in Moodle
8   - can also be typed in here and they will be displayed correctly. For example, :-) = <img src="pix/s/smiley.gif"> </dd>
9   -
10   -<dt><b>Links</b></dt>
11   -<dd>Internet addresses will be turned into links automatically.</dd>
12   -
13   -<dt><b>Emoting</b></dt>
14   -<dd>You can start a line with "/me" or ":" to emote. For example, if your name is Kim and you
15   - type ":laughs!" or "/me laughs!" then everyone will see "Kim laughs!"</dd>
16   -
17   -<dt><b>Beeps</b></dt>
18   -<dd>You can send a sound to other people by hitting the "beep" link next to their name. A useful
19   - shortcut to beep all the people in the chat at once is to type "beep all".</dd>
20   -
21   -<dt><b>HTML</b></dt>
22   -<dd>If you know some HTML code, you can use it in your text to do things like insert images,
23   - play sounds or create different coloured and sized text.</dd>
24   -
25   -</dl>
26   -
9 lang/th/help/chat/mods.html
... ... @@ -1,9 +0,0 @@
1   -<P><IMG VALIGN=absmiddle SRC="<?php echo $CFG->wwwroot?>/mod/chat/icon.gif">&nbsp;<B>Chats</B></P>
2   -<UL>
3   -<P>The Chat module allows participants to have a real-time synchronous
4   - discussion via the web. This is a useful way to get a different
5   - understanding of each other and the topic being discussed - the mode
6   - of using a chat room is quite different from the asynchronous forums.
7   - The Chat module contains a number of features for managing and
8   - reviewing chat discussions.</P>
9   -</UL>
9 lang/th/help/dialogue/addsubject.html
... ... @@ -1,9 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Adding Subjects</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>You can use this link to add a Subject to the dialogue. It's a
4   - good idea to always have a subject for the dialogue, it keeps
5   - the dialogue on track and focuses the replies on the topic.
6   - If you want to start talking about another subject it is
7   - better to close the current dialogue and start a new dialogue
8   - on that topic.</p>
9   -
13 lang/th/help/dialogue/closedialogue.html
... ... @@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Closing Dialogues</b></p>
2   -<p>You can close a dialogue at any time. Closing a dialogue
3   - stops the dialogue and removes it from your current list of dialogues. That is,
4   - closed dialogues do not appear on this page. </p>
5   -
6   -<p>You will be able to view closed dialogues but you can not add to them.
7   - However, closed dialogues are eventually deleted and after that point they
8   - obviously will not be available even for viewing.</p>
9   -
10   -<p>If you do close this dialogue, then you will have to start a new dialogue
11   - if you want to continue to &quot;talk&quot; with this person. That person
12   - will re-appear in the list of people you can start dialogues with.</p>
13   -
7 lang/th/help/dialogue/deleteafter.html
... ... @@ -1,7 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Deletion of Dialogues</b></p>
2   -<p>This option sets the time interval in days for the deletion of
3   - dialogues. It only applies to CLOSED dialogues. </p>
4   -
5   -<p>If the time period is set to zero then dialogues are never
6   -deleted.</p>
7   -
17 lang/th/help/dialogue/dialoguetype.html
... ... @@ -1,17 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Dialogue Types</b></p>
2   -<p>There are three types of Dialogues.</p>
3   -
4   -<ol><li><p><b>Teacher to Student</b> This allows dialogues between
5   - teachers and students. Dialogues can be started by either
6   - teachers or students. In the lists of people, teachers only
7   - see students and students only see teachers.</p></li>
8   -
9   -<li><p><b>Student to Student</b> This allows dialogues between
10   - students. Teachers are <b>not</b> included at all in this type of
11   - dialogue</p></li>
12   -
13   -<li><p><b>Everybody</b> This allows everybody in the Class to
14   - start a dialogue with anybody else. Teachers can start
15   - dialogues with other teachers and students, students can start
16   - dialogues with other students and teachers. </p></li>
17   -</ol>
20 lang/th/help/dialogue/info.html
... ... @@ -1,20 +0,0 @@
1   -<img valign=absmiddle src="<?php echo $cfg->wwwroot?>/mod/dialogue/icon.gif">&nbsp;<b>Dialogues</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>This module provides a simple communication method between pairs of users.
4   - A teacher can open an dialogue with a student, a student can open
5   - a dialogue with a teacher, and (optionally) a student can open a
6   - dialogue with another student. A teacher or student can be involved
7   - in many on-going dialogues at any time.</p>
8   -
9   -<p>A dialogue can have an unlimited number of entries, normally the
10   - &quot;conversation&quot; takes place as a set of interleaved
11   - replies. This format is not enforced and either party can add to the
12   - dialogue at any time.</p>
13   -
14   -<p>A dialogue can be closed by either party at any time. Closed dialogues
15   - cannot be reopened. However, a closed
16   - dialogue can be viewed by either party provided it is still in existence... </p>
17   -
18   -<p>...The module deletes closed dialogues and all their entries after a
19   - certain time. That time is set here when the Dialogue is created.</p>
20   -
7 lang/th/help/dialogue/maildefault.html
... ... @@ -1,7 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Set Mail Default</b></p>
2   -<p>This sets the default value for the &quot;Send this message
3   - by email&quot; option when adding a new entry. If this option
4   - is set to &quot;Yes&quot; then the sent mail box will be checked.
5   - Otherwise the send mail box will not be checked.
6   - </p>
7   -
8 lang/th/help/dialogue/mods.html
... ... @@ -1,8 +0,0 @@
1   -<p><img valign=absmiddle src="<?php echo $CFG->wwwroot?>/mod/dialogue/icon.gif">&nbsp;<b>Dialogues</b></p>
2   -<ul>
3   -<p>This module provides a simple communication method between pairs of users.
4   - A teacher can open an dialogue with a student, a student can open
5   - a dialogue with a teacher, and (optionally) a student can open a
6   - dialogue with another student. A teacher or student can be involved
7   - in many on-going dialogues at any time.</p>
8   -</ul>
10 lang/th/help/dialogue/multiple.html
... ... @@ -1,10 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Multiple Dialogues</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>This option allows a person to start more than one dialogue with
4   - someone else. The default is No, which only allows one (open)
5   - dialogue between two people.</p>
6   -
7   -<p>Allowing multiple dialogues may result in an abuse of this
8   - facility. Some people may be &quot;pestered&quot; by others
9   - opening many unwanted dialogues with them.</p>
10   -
13 lang/th/help/dialogue/sendmail.html
... ... @@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>Sending Mail Messages</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>If the box is ticked or checked then a mail message is sent to the
4   - other person telling that you have added to (or started) a dialogue
5   - with them. The message does <b>not</b> contain the entry, only a
6   - short statement and, when appropriate, a link to where they can see
7   - the dialogue itself.</p>
8   -
9   -<p>You only really need to send such mail messages if you think the other
10   - person is unlikely to see your entry because of their infrequent
11   - use of the course. The Participants list can tell you when they
12   - were last active in the course.</p>
13   -
18 lang/th/help/dialogue/writing.html
... ... @@ -1,18 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Writing</B></P>
2   -
3   -<P>When writing text for others to read, try and write directly to your audience.</P>
4   -
5   -<P>Explain your ideas as clearly and simply as you can to help avoid misunderstandings.
6   - One thing you can do is to avoid long words when a short one will do.</P>
7   -
8   -<P>In a dialogue it will really help to keep your posts short and on-topic.
9   - You can always close a dialogue and start another one if you want to start
10   - discussing something else.
11   -
12   -<P>When replying to others, try and think of interesting questions you
13   - can ask them. This will help both you and the other person think (and learn!)
14   - about the subject you are discussing.</P>
15   -
16   -
17   -<p align=right><a href="help.php?file=questions.html">More info about asking questions</a></p>
18   -<p align=right><a href="help.php?file=reading.html">More info about reading</a></p>
42 lang/th/help/exercise/administration.html
... ... @@ -1,42 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Administration</B></P>
2   -
3   -<p>The first table on this screen shows how the the overall grades for the
4   - submissions are calculated. The overall grades are a weighted sum of
5   - two components.</p>
6   -
7   -<ol><li>The teacher's grade for the student's (initial) assessment of their own work.
8   - This can be termed the &quot;grading grade&quot;. Once the student has
9   - submitted their work the assessment is not revised. The student is NOT asked
10   - to re-assess their work each time they resubmit their work. The grade given to
11   - student's assessment is relavant to the student's performance but it is not as
12   - important as the (teacher's) assessment of the work. In general it should be
13   - given a lower weight than...
14   -<li>The grade given by the teacher to the student pieces of work. These
15   - assessments are the normally the main assessment element of an exercise
16   - assignment. When the students are allowed to make
17   - more than one submission the teacher can decide whether the final grade
18   - for the exercise should be the average grade of a student's submissions or
19   - the grade from the student's best submission.
20   -</ol>
21   -
22   -<p>These two components are weighted as deemed appropriate for the
23   - assignment. The teacher can, for example, weight the (initial) assessment grade
24   - (the grading grade) very low, even zero. In this case the student grade is
25   - determined largely by or entirely by the grades given to their submissions. The
26   - two weighting factors can be changed at any time during the exercise, the effect
27   - of any change on the grades seen in the Grades page and in the Final Grades
28   - list is immediate.</p>
29   -
30   -<p>The second table is used to set the two options for the League Table. This table
31   - is (optionally) shown to the students at the end of the assignment. If the
32   - number of entries is set to a number larger than zero then the table is
33   - displayed to the student when the assignment is in its final phase. The other
34   - option determines whether student names are shown in the table. Note the League
35   - Table as seen by the teacher always shows studnet names regardless of this setting.
36   -
37   -<p>The Administration page also lists the teacher's submissions (the decriptions of
38   - the Exercise), the students' (initial) assessment of their own work, and the students'
39   - submissions. These tables allow all these items, where appropriate, to be re-titled,
40   - deleted, viewed or re-assessed. This part of the page can be used to monitor the
41   - students' progress throughout the course of the exercise.
42   -</p>
65 lang/th/help/exercise/elements.html
... ... @@ -1,65 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Assignment Elements</B></P>
2   -
3   -<P>For ease of grading, a Workshop Assignment should have a reasonable
4   - number of &quot;Assessment Elements&quot;. Each element should cover
5   - a particular aspect of the assignment. Typically an assignment will have
6   - something between 5 to 15 elements for comments and grading, the
7   - actual number depending on the size and complexity of the assignment. A peer
8   - assignment with only one element is allowed and has a similar assessment
9   - strategy to the standard Moodle Assignment.
10   -
11   -<P>The type of elements dependent of the assignment's grading strategy.
12   -
13   -<P><B>Not Graded.</B> The elements are descriptions of aspects of the assignment.
14   - The assessor is asked to comment on each of these aspects. As with all the grading
15   - strategies, there is also an area for general comments.
16   -
17   -
18   -<P><B>Accumulative Grading.</B> The elements have the following three features:
19   -<OL>
20   -<LI>The DESCRIPTION of the assessment element. This should clearly state what
21   - aspect of the assignment is being assessed. If the assessment is qualatative
22   - it is helpful to give details of what is considered excellent, average
23   - and poor.
24   -
25   -<LI>The SCALE of the assessment element. There are a number of prefined
26   - scales. These range from simple Yes/No scales, through multipoint scales to
27   - a full percentage scale. Each element has its own scale which should be choosen
28   - to fit the number of possible variations for that element. Note that the scale
29   - does NOT determine the element's importance when calculating the overall
30   - grade, a two point scale has the same &quot;influence&quot; as a 100 point
31   - scale if the respective elements have the same weight...
32   -
33   -<LI>The WEIGHT of the assessment element. By default the elements are given the same
34   - importance when calculating the overall grade of the assignment. This can be
35   - changed by giving the more importance elements a weight greater than one, and
36   - the less important elements a weight below one. Changing the weights does NOT
37   - effect the maximum grade, that value is fixed by the Maximum Grade parameter
38   - of the peer assignment. Weights can be assigned negative values, this is an
39   - experimental feature.
40   -</OL>
41   -<P><B>Error Banded Grading.</B> The elements will normally describe certain items
42   - or aspects which must be present in the assignment. The assessment is made on the
43   - present or absence of these items or aspects. The teacher must all set of grade table which
44   - give the suggested grades when all the items are present, when one is absent, when two are
45   - absent, etc. If certain items are more important than others then those items can be given
46   - a weighting greater than one. Minor items can be given a weighting less than one. The
47   - overall &quot;error count&quot; is a weighted sum of the missing items. The assessor
48   - can always make a minor adjustment to these suggested grades.
49   -
50   -<P><B>Criterion Grading.</B> The elements will give a set of &quot;level&quot; statements
51   -which can be used to rank the assignment. The statements may be cumulative or they may
52   -each be self contained. The assessor must decide which statement best fits each piece of
53   -work. The teacher must also relate each criterion statement with a suggested grade. These
54   -should normally be in order. The assessor can make a minor adjustment to these
55   -suggested grades.</P>
56   -
57   -<P><B>Rubric Grading.</B> This is similar to Criterion Grading but there is more than
58   -one criteria. The number of criteria is given in the assignment parameters. Within each
59   -criterion there can be up to five &quot;level&quot; statements. In a given assignment
60   -the number of levels can vary from criterion to criterion. When setting up a criterion a
61   -blank level statement signals the end of the level statements. Thus some criteria may have
62   -two levels, others have three, up to five levels. The criteria can be weighted. The levels
63   -are scored 0, 1, 2, up to 4. The grade for the assessment is a weighted sum of these
64   -scores.
65   -</P>
12 lang/th/help/exercise/finalgrades.html
... ... @@ -1,12 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>The Final Grades</B></P>
2   -
3   -<p>The table on this screen lists the overall grades and their breakdown. The first grade is
4   - the grade for the (inital) assessment. This is added to the grades given to each
5   - submission. The Weights row gives the factors used in the calculation of the overall
6   - grade from these two grades. The final grade given for this assignment will either be
7   - the average of these overall grades or the overall grade of the best submission.
8   -
9   -<p>The League table optionally lists the best submissions. The number of entries in
10   - the table is set on the Administration page, if that number is set to zero then
11   - the League Table is not displayed. The table is in grade order with the best submission
12   - first. Only a student's best submission is shown in the table.</p>
8 lang/th/help/exercise/grade.html
... ... @@ -1,8 +0,0 @@
1   -<p align="center"><b>The Grade of the Exercise</b></p>
2   -
3   -<p>This value determines the maximum grade which can be awarded in
4   - the exercise. The range is 0 to 100%.. This value can be changed at
5   - any time during the exercise. Any change has an immediate effect in
6   - the Grades page, the grades given to assessments and submissions and the
7   - display of the final finals and the League Table (if the assignment is
8   - in that phase).</p>
40 lang/th/help/exercise/grading.html
... ... @@ -1,40 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Grading of Assignments</B></P>
2   -
3   -<p>In this Exercise the same Assessment Form is used by Students and Teachers
4   - to assess the work produced. The form is used at different stages of the
5   - exercise by the two groups, thus the explaination given here is divided into
6   - two parts.</p>
7   -
8   -<p><b>For Students</b></p>
9   -
10   -<p>The assessment form is used mainly to show you how your work will be
11   - assessed by the teacher. You are required to complete this form <b>before</b>
12   - you can submit your work. You can use it as a checklist. The form is <b>not</b>
13   - sent to the teacher when you save it. You can return to this form and amend it
14   - (and your piece of work) as many times as you like provided you have
15   - <b>not</b> submitted the work. Note that although you are allowed to, there
16   - is no need to submit your work immediately after you have completely this form.
17   - However, the contents of your assessment are frozen and made available to the
18   - teacher when you submit your work.</p>
19   -
20   -<p>If the teacher requests that you make changes to your work and to re-submit
21   - it, you will <b>not</b> be asked to re-assess your &quot;new&quot; piece of
22   - work. You only make this assessment &quot;first time round&quot;.</p>
23   -
24   -<p>This (initial) assessment of your work is looked at by the teacher and they
25   - can add comments and grade it. You will be able to see these comments and
26   - the grade given to your assessment may form part of the final grade you
27   - receive from this Exercise.</p>
28   -
29   -<p><b>For the Teacher</b></p>
30   -
31   -<p>The assessment form is used to grade the submissions of the students.
32   - These grades normally form the major component of the students' final grade
33   - for the exercise. The assessment, it's grade and any comments you make can
34   - be viewed by the student who submitted the work. Once you have made the
35   - assessment you should decide whether to allow the student to change and
36   - re-submit their work, hopefully with improvements, or not.</p>
37   -
38   -<p>When you save an assessment you given a short period of time in which to
39   - make any amendments before the assessment to &quot;released&quot; to
40   - the student.</p>
15 lang/th/help/exercise/gradinggrade.html
... ... @@ -1,15 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Grading of Assessments</B></P>
2   -
3   -<p>In the first half of this page the Student Assessment of their own work is shown.
4   - This assessment should be graded (out of a maximum of 20). It represents an
5   - assessment of the work shown in the second of the Link boxes. (The topmost
6   - link box is the description of the exercise itself.) The &quot;Grading Grade&quot;
7   - should normally be explained in a comment which you enter in the Teacher's
8   - Comment box. The grade should reflect the accuracy of the assessment, an
9   - assessment which gives a low grade to a poor piece of work should receive
10   - a higher Grading Grade than one which gives a low mark to a good piece of
11   - work, for example.</p>
12   -
13   -<p>In the second half of this page there is a blank Assessment Form for your
14   - own assessment of the piece of work from the student.</p>
15   -
78 lang/th/help/exercise/gradingstrategy.html
... ... @@ -1,78 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Grading Strategy</B></P>
2   -
3   -<P>A workshop assignment is quite flexible in the type of grading scheme used. This can be:
4   -
5   -<OL>
6   -<LI><B>No grading:</B> In this type of assignment the teacher is not
7   - interested in quantative assessment from the students at all. The students
8   - make comments of the pieces of works but do not grade them. The teacher,
9   - however, can, if desired, grade the student comments. These
10   - &quot;grading grades&quot; form the basis of the students' final grades.
11   - If the teacher does not grade the student assessments then the assignment
12   - does not have any final grades.
13   -
14   -<LI><B>Accumulative grading:</B> This is the default type of grading.
15   - In this type of assignment the grade of each
16   - assessment is made up of a number of &quot;assessment elements&quot;.
17   - Each element should cover
18   - a particular aspect of the assignment. Typically an assignment will have
19   - something between 5 to 15 elements for comments and grading, the
20   - actual number depending on the size and complexity of the assignment. An
21   - exercise assignment with only one element is allowed and has a similar assessment
22   - strategy to the standard Moodle Assignment.
23   -
24   -<P>Elements have the following three features:
25   -<OL>
26   -<LI>The DESCRIPTION of the assessment element. This should clearly state what
27   - aspect of the assignment is being assessed. If the assessment is qualatative
28   - it is helpful to give details of what is considered excellent, average
29   - and poor.
30   -
31   -<LI>The SCALE of the assessment element. There are a number of prefined
32   - scales. These range from simple Yes/No scales, through multipoint scales to
33   - a full percentage scale. Each element has its own scale which should be choosen
34   - to fit the number of possible variations for that element. Note that the scale
35   - does NOT determine the element's importance when calculating the overall
36   - grade, a two point scale has the same &quot;influence&quot; as a 100 point
37   - scale if the respective elements have the same weight...
38   -
39   -<LI>The WEIGHT of the assessment element. By default the elements are given the same
40   - importance when calculating the overall grade of the assignment. This can be
41   - changed by giving the more importance elements a weight greater than one, and
42   - the less important elements a weight below one. Changing the weights does NOT
43   - effect the maximum grade, that value is fixed by the Maximum Grade parameter
44   - of the peer assignment. Weights can be assigned negative values, this is an
45   - experimental feature.
46   -</OL>
47   -
48   -<LI><B>Error Banded Grading:</B> In this type of assignment the submissions are
49   - graded on a set of Yes/No scales. The grade is determined by the &quot;Grade
50   - Table &quot; which gives the relationship between the number of
51   - &quot;errors&quot; and the suggested grade. For example an assignment may have six
52   - significant items which should be present, the Grade Table will give suggested
53   - grades if all are present, one is absent, if two are absent, etc. The individual
54   - items can, if desired, be given weighting factors if some items are more important
55   - than others. The number of &quot;errors&quot; is a weighted sum of the items not
56   - present. By default each item is given a weight of one. The grading table is likely
57   - to be non-linear, for example
58   - the sugested grades may be 90%, 70%, 50%, 40%, 30%, 20%, 10%, 0%, 0%, 0% for
59   - an assignment with 10 items.The assessor can adjust the suggested grade by up
60   - to 20% either way to give the submission's final grade.
61   -
62   -<LI><B>Criterion Grading:</B> This is simpliest type of assessment to grade (although
63   - not necessarily the most straightforward to set up). The submissions are
64   - graded against a set of criteria statments. The assessor choses which statement
65   - best fits the piece of work. The grade is determined by a &quot;Criteria
66   - Table&quot; which gives the suggested grade for each criterion. For example
67   - an assignment may be set up with, say, five criteria statements and the assessors
68   - must then choose one of the five statements for each of their assessments. As with
69   - the Banded assignment the assessor can adjust the suggested grade by up to
70   - 20% to give the final grade.
71   -
72   -<li><b>Rubric</b> This is a similar to Criterion Grading except there are multiple
73   - sets of criteria. Each set covering a particular &quot;Category&quot;, can have
74   - up to five statements. The sets are given individual
75   - weights and the grade is a weighted combination of the scores from each set. There
76   - is <b>no</b> adjustment option in this assessment type.
77   -</OL>
78   -</P>
86 lang/th/help/exercise/managing.html
... ... @@ -1,86 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Managing an Exercise Assignment</B></P>
2   -
3   -<P>An Exercise Assignment is slightly more complex than an ordinary assignment.
4   - It involves three steps or phases. These are
5   -<OL>
6   -<LI><p><b>Set up Exercise </b> The assessment of the work produced in the
7   - exercise is made easier if it is broken into a number of assessment ELEMENTS.
8   - This makes the grading of an assignment less
9   - arbitary and gives the students a framework on which to make assessments.
10   - The teacher has the role of setting up the assessment elements thus making a
11   - grading sheet. (See that page for more details.)</p>
12   -
13   - <P>With the assessment elements set up the teacher must submit a
14   - Word Document or HTML file which describes the exercise or task to be done
15   - by the students. This file is shown to the students in the second phase of
16   - the exercise. </p>
17   -
18   - <p>Teachers can, if they wish, prepare a set of similar exercies, again as
19   - Word Documents or HTML files, and upload those into the Exercise. Note that
20   - these exercises must be quite similar as the same Assessment Form is used
21   - for all of these variants. The submission of a multiple set of exercises by
22   - the teacher is optional and for certain assignments may not be appropriate.</P>
23   -
24   -<LI><p><b>Allow Students Assessments and Submissions</b> The assignment
25   - is now opened to the students. If the teacher has set up multiple exercises then
26   - the students see different exercises, otherwise all the students see the same
27   - exercise.</p>
28   -
29   -<p>Before the students can submit their work they must complete the assessment
30   - form. Once they have completed the assessment they are shown the upload form.
31   - The students can revise their work in the light of their self assessment. The teacher
32   - sees student's (self) assessment and an assessment form to grade the student's
33   - submission. This is a &quot;dual assessment form&quot;. At the end of this
34   - form the teacher can either ask the student to re-submit the work or not.</p>
35   -
36   -<p>If the student chooses to re-submit, the teacher can re-assess the work. The
37   - same option, re-submit or not, allows the teacher to control this cycle of
38   - re-submission and assessment. If students are allowed to put in multiple pieces
39   - of work into the Exercise, the teacher should decide whether the final grades
40   - are based on the student's maximum grade or their average grade over the
41   - set of submissions. This option can be changed at any time during the Exercise
42   - by updating the Exercise, it's effect is seen immediately in the Grade page.
43   -</p>
44   -
45   -<p>When the assignment's deadline is reached a student can submit or re-submit work.
46   - The work is flagged as &quot;late&quot;. The work appears in the list of work to
47   - be assessed and the teacher can, if desired, assess the work in the normal way.
48   - In the various lists of peices of work the submission date is shown as red (and
49   - in the list of work to be be marked the period since submission is also shown in
50   - red). If graded, the grade of late work is shown in red and in brackets. Such
51   - grades are <b>not</b> used in the calculation of final grades and are not counted
52   - in the Grades pages. The teacher can clear the late flag by going into in the
53   - Administration page and clicking on the appropriate link. The work will then be
54   - used in the calculation of the final grade. </p>
55   -
56   -<li><p><b>Show Overall Grades and League Table</b> In this final phase of
57   - the Exercise the students can see their &quot;final&quot; grades. In all
58   - phases of the Exercise (except the first phase), grades are available to
59   - the students, they are, however, only &quot;partial&quot; grades as they are
60   - calculated on the fly from the assessments available at the time.</p>
61   -
62   -<p>In this final phase, students <b>cannot</b> make any further submissions.
63   - In effect the assignment is closed and the teacher has the option of showing
64   - the students examples of the best pieces of work submitted...</p>
65   -
66   -<p>The students (and the teacher) can also be shown a &quot;League Table&quot;
67   - of the student submissions. These are listed in order of grade, the top submission
68   - is first. Here the grade given to the submission is teacher's
69   - grade. If a student submitted more than one piece of work only their best piece
70   - of work is shown in this table. If the number of entries in the table is set to
71   - zero then this table is not displayed.</p>
72   -</ol>
73   -
74   -<p>The student's grade is a weighted combination of the teacher's grading of their
75   - (initial) assessment and the teacher's grading of their work. The two weighting
76   - factors are initally set to unity. They can changed (on the Administration page)
77   - at any time during the exercise and the grades shown both the students and the
78   - teacher always reflect the current weighting factors.</p>
79   -
80   -<p>At any phase of the assignment the teacher can open the &quot;Administration&quot;
81   - page. This shows the current values of the two weighting factors and allows the teacher
82   - to change them. It lists the students' assessments (of their own work) and the
83   - submissions of the students. The teacher can use this page to assess and re-assess
84   - submissions, grade and re-grade assessments, delete submissions and assessments,
85   - and generally watch the progress of the assignment.</p>
86   -
13 lang/th/help/exercise/mods.html
... ... @@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
1   -<IMG VALIGN=absmiddle SRC="<?php echo $CFG->wwwroot?>/mod/exercise/icon.gif">&nbsp;<B>Exercise</B>
2   -
3   -<UL>
4   -<P>An Exercise is a simple but powerful assignment. In an exercise the teacher
5   -asks the students to do a piece of practical work. It could be writing an essay
6   -or a report, preparing a presentation, or setting out a spreadsheet, etc. When
7   -the student has done the task they must first self-assess their work before
8   -submitting it to the teacher. Once submitted the teacher can assess both the
9   -student's assessment and the piece of work itself. The teacher can give
10   -feedback to the student and ask the student to improve the work and re-submit
11   -it or not as the case may be.</p>
12   -</UL>
13   -
88 lang/th/help/exercise/moreinfo.html
... ... @@ -1,88 +0,0 @@
1   -<IMG VALIGN=absmiddle SRC="<?php echo $CFG->wwwroot?>/mod/exercise/icon.gif">&nbsp;<B>Exercise</B>
2   -
3   -<P>An Exercise is a simple but powerful assignment. In an exercise the teacher
4   -asks the students to do a piece of practical work. It could be writing an essay
5   -or a report, preparing a presentation, or setting out a spreadsheet, etc. When
6   -the student has done the task they must first self-assess their work before
7   -submitting it to the teacher. Once submitted the teacher can assess both the
8   -student's assessment and the piece of work itself. The teacher can give
9   -feedback to the student and ask the student to improve the work and re-submit
10   -it or not as the case may be.</p>
11   -
12   -<p>Before the start of the exercise the teacher sets up the exercise by
13   -<ol> <li>Creating a Word document or HTML file which introduces the exercise
14   - and tells the students what they have to produce. This file is uploaded
15   - into the exercise by the teacher.
16   -
17   -<li>Adding the textual elements and choosing the options in the Assessment
18   - Form. This form is used by both the students and the teacher to assess the
19   - work produced in the exercise. There are various types of assessment
20   - which can be used (see the help on &quot;Grading Stratgey&quot;)
21   -</ol></p>
22   -
23   -<p>In large classes, the teacher may find to helpful to create more than one version
24   - of the exercise. These variants add a degree of variety to the exercise and
25   - ensure that students are doing different tasks in the exercise. They
26   - are allocated to the students in a random but balanced way. Each student
27   - receives only one exercise but the the number of
28   - times each variant is allocated in a class is approximately the same. Note
29   - the variants should not be too different as the same assessment form is used for
30   - all of the variants.</p>
31   -
32   -<p>With the description(s) of the exercise and the assessment form in place,
33   - the assignment is opened to the students. They are shown a description
34   - of the exercise or task. When they have done the exercise they must assess
35   - their own work (using the pre-prepared assessment form) before they can
36   - submit their work to the teacher. The assessment form can be used as a
37   - &quot;checklist&quot; by the students. They can, if they wish, revise both
38   - their work and the assessment before they actually submit their work, and
39   - probably they should be encouraged to do so!</p>
40   -
41   -<p>Once a student has submitted their work both their assessment and the
42   - piece of work itself becomes available to the teacher. The assessments can be
43   - graded and there is a box for comments. The teacher can also access the piece
44   - of work (using the student's assessment as a starting point) and make a
45   - decision whether to ask the student to re-submit an improved version of the
46   - work or not.</p>
47   -
48   -<p>If the teacher feels that the student's piece of work could be improved, the
49   - student can be given the opprtunity to re-submit. If this is taken up the
50   - teacher re-assesses the work using an assessment form which contains
51   - the grades and comments they gave to the student's previous submission.
52   - Thus, the re-assessment is then a matter of updating the form in the light
53   - of the student revised work rather than undertaking an assessment from
54   - scratch.</p>
55   -
56   -<p>When the deadline for the exercise is reached students can continue to submit.
57   - However, such work is flagged as &quot;late&quot;. The teacher can, if
58   - desired, grade the work and give feedback to the student. The grades of
59   - late work are held back and are <b>not</b> used in the calculation of final
60   - grades. If, for whatever reason, the teacher wishes to accept a piece of
61   - late work as a normal piece of work the late flag can be cleared by going
62   - into the Administration page, finding the submission and clicking on the
63   - appropriate link. The grade for that work will then be used in the calculation
64   - of a final grades.</p>
65   -
66   -<p>When all the submissions have been graded, the exercise is moved to the
67   - final phase. Further student submissions are now not allowed. The students
68   - can now see their final grades together with the grades given to
69   - their submissions. A student's grade for the exercise is a weighted combination
70   - of the teacher's grade for their self-assessment and the teacher's grade for that
71   - work. (The grade given by the student is <b>not</b> used.) For the submissions
72   - themselves the grade is teacher's assessment. The weights used for the two
73   - grades (the grading grade and the actual grade for the work) can be set and
74   - changed at any time during the assignment (the weights are set on the
75   - Administration page).</p>
76   -
77   -<p>When the teacher allows students to resubmit work, the teacher should
78   - consider how to set the option which controls how the student's final grade
79   - is calculated from multiple submissions. This option allows the teacher to
80   - choose between using the mean grade of the student's submissions or their
81   - best submission. This option can changed at any time and it has an immediate
82   - effect in the grades screen.</p>
83   -
84   -<p>In the final phase of the exercise the students can also see a &quot;League
85   - Table&quot; of submissions. This an ordered list of the submissions, the
86   - submission which received the highest grade is at the top. When there are
87   - multiple submissions only the student's best submission is show in this list.</p>
88   -
20 lang/th/help/exercise/nelements.html
... ... @@ -1,20 +0,0 @@
1   -<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Number of Comments, Elements, Bands, Criteria or Rubrics</B></P>
2   -
3   -<P>The number entered here determines how many items will be used in
4   - the assessments. Depending on the type of grading strategy, this number
5   - gives the number of comments, assessments elements, bands, criteria or
6   - categories (sets) of criteria in a rubric. Typically an assignment will have
7   - something between 5 to 15 assessment items, the
8   - actual number depending on the size and complexity of the assignment.