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removing English help files from non-English language packs

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1 parent 7cf2a0d commit edf9d85ab4e0769300d2190433337af8f8f64a32 koenr committed Jul 6, 2004
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  1. +0 −6 lang/pt/help/quiz/attempts.html
  2. +0 −17 lang/pt/help/quiz/categories.html
  3. +0 −6 lang/pt/help/quiz/correctanswers.html
  4. +0 −5 lang/pt/help/quiz/feedback.html
  5. +0 −25 lang/pt/help/quiz/grademethod.html
  6. +0 −11 lang/pt/help/quiz/maxgrade.html
  7. +0 −19 lang/pt/help/quiz/multichoice.html
  8. +0 −37 lang/pt/help/quiz/questiontypes.html
  9. +0 −10 lang/pt/help/quiz/shortanswer.html
  10. +0 −5 lang/pt/help/quiz/timeopen.html
  11. +0 −11 lang/pt/help/quiz/truefalse.html
  12. +0 −23 lang/pt/help/resource/resourcetype.html
  13. +0 −160 lang/pt/help/richtext.html
  14. +0 −20 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/addingacomment.html
  15. +0 −35 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/agreeassessments.html
  16. +0 −14 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/anonymous.html
  17. +0 −21 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/assignmenttype.html
  18. +0 −23 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/breakdownoffinalgrade.html
  19. +0 −54 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/calculatingfinalgrade.html
  20. +0 −6 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/editingacomment.html
  21. +0 −56 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/elements.html
  22. +0 −21 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/finalgrades.html
  23. +0 −14 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/graded.html
  24. +0 −32 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/grading.html
  25. +0 −20 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/gradingassessments.html
  26. +0 −73 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/gradingstrategy.html
  27. +0 −13 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/includeself.html
  28. +0 −4 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/index.html
  29. +0 −58 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/managing.html
  30. +0 −13 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/nassessmentsofstudentsubmissions.html
  31. +0 −10 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/nassessmentsofteachersexamples.html
  32. +0 −15 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/nelements.html
  33. +0 −30 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/numberofassessors.html
  34. +0 −19 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/resubmit.html
  35. +0 −12 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/selfassessment.html
  36. +0 −15 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/showinggrades.html
  37. +0 −11 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/specimen.html
  38. +0 −13 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/teachersgradings.html
View
6 lang/pt/help/quiz/attempts.html
@@ -1,6 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Quiz attempts</B></P>
-
-<P>Students may be allowed to have multiple attempts at a quiz.
-
-<P>This can help make the process of taking the quiz more of
- an educational activity rather than simply an assessment.
View
17 lang/pt/help/quiz/categories.html
@@ -1,17 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Question categories</B></P>
-
-<P>Rather than keeping all your questions in one big list,
- you can create categories to keep them in.
-
-<P>Each category consists of a name and a short description.
-
-<P>Each category can also be "published", which means
- that the category (and all questions in it) will be
- available to all courses on this server, so that
- other courses can use your questions in their quizzes.
-
-<P>Categories can also be created or deleted at will.
- However, if you try to delete a category containing
- questions, then you will be asked to specify another
- category to move them to.
-
View
6 lang/pt/help/quiz/correctanswers.html
@@ -1,6 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Show correct answers</B></P>
-
-<P>If you enable correct answers, then the
-feedback will show also show the correct answer
-for each question (highlighted in a bright colour).
-</P>
View
5 lang/pt/help/quiz/feedback.html
@@ -1,5 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Feedback</B></P>
-
-<P>If you enable quiz feedback, then students will receive
- question feedback on every answer (right or wrong).</P>
-
View
25 lang/pt/help/quiz/grademethod.html
@@ -1,25 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Grading method</B></P>
-
-<P>When multiple attempts are allowed, there are different ways
- you can use the grades to calculate the student's final
- grade for the quiz.
-
-<P><B>Highest grade</B><P>
-<UL>
-<P>The final grade is the highest (best) grade in any attempt.
-</UL>
-
-<P><B>Average grade</B><P>
-<UL>
-<P>The final grade is the average (simple mean) grade of all attempts.
-</UL>
-
-<P><B>First grade</B><P>
-<UL>
-<P>The final grade is the grade gained on the first attempt (other attempts are ignored).
-</UL>
-
-<P><B>Last grade</B><P>
-<UL>
-<P>The final grade is the grade gained on the most recent attempt only.
-</UL>
View
11 lang/pt/help/quiz/maxgrade.html
@@ -1,11 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Maximum grade</B></P>
-
-<P>The maximum grade you set for a quiz is what all grades
- are scaled to.
-
-<P>For example, you might set the max grade to 20, because the
- quiz is worth 20% of the whole course.
-
-<P>Even though you might have 10 questions in your quiz
- worth a total of 50 marks, all grades out of 50 will be
- "scaled down" to the quiz max grade of 20.
View
19 lang/pt/help/quiz/multichoice.html
@@ -1,19 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Multiple Choice questions</B></P>
-
-<P>In response to a question (that may include a image) the respondent
- chooses from multiple answers. There are two types of multiple choice
- questions - single answer and multiple answer.
-
-<P>Single-answer questions allow one and only one answer to be chosen.
- Generally all the grades for such a question should be positive.
-
-<P>Multiple-answer questions allow one or more answers to be chosen - each answer
- may carry a positive or negative grade, so that choosing ALL the options
- will not necessarily result in good grade. If the total grade is negative
- then the total grade for this question will be zero. Careful, it is
- possible to create questions that have scores greater than 100%.
-
-<P>Finally, each answer (right or wrong) should include feedback - this feedback
- will be shown to the respondent next to each of their answers (if the quiz
- itself is configured to show feedback).
-</P>
View
37 lang/pt/help/quiz/questiontypes.html
@@ -1,37 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Creating a new question</B></P>
-
-<P>You can add a variety of different types of questions to a category:</P>
-
-<P><B>Multiple Choice</B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>In response to a question (that may include a image) the respondent
- chooses from multiple answers. There are two types of multiple choice
- questions - single answer and multiple answer.
-<P>More info: <?php helpbutton("multichoice", "", "quiz") ?></P>
-</UL>
-
-<P><B>Short Answer</B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>In response to a question (that may include a image), the respondent
- types a word or phrase. There may several possible correct answers,
- with different grades. Answers may or may not be sensitive to case.
-</P>
-<P>More info: <?php helpbutton("shortanswer", "", "quiz") ?></P>
-</UL>
-
-<P><B>True/False</B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>In response to a question (that may include a image), the respondent
- selects from two options: True or False.
-</P>
-<P>More info: <?php helpbutton("truefalse", "", "quiz") ?></P>
-</UL>
-
-<P><B>Random</B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>(Not yet implemented) Allows you to select a number of other questions from
- which one gets randomly selected each time a student attempts the quiz.
-</P>
-<P>More info: <?php helpbutton("random", "", "quiz") ?></P>
-</UL>
-
View
10 lang/pt/help/quiz/shortanswer.html
@@ -1,10 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Short Answer questions</B></P>
-
-<P>In response to a question (that may include a image) the respondent
- types a word or short phrase.
-
-<P>There may be several possible correct answers, each with a different
- grade. If the "Case sensitive" option is selected, then you can
- have different scores for "Word" or "word".
-
-<P>Answers are compared exactly, so be careful with your spelling!
View
5 lang/pt/help/quiz/timeopen.html
@@ -1,5 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Opening and closing the quiz</B></P>
-
-<P>You can specify times when the quiz is accessible for people to make attempts.
-
-<P>Before the opening time, and after the closing time, the quiz will be unavailable.
View
11 lang/pt/help/quiz/truefalse.html
@@ -1,11 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>True/False questions</B></P>
-
-
-<P>In response to a question (that may include a image) the respondent
- chooses from True or False.
-
-<P>If feedback is enabled, then the appropriate feedback message is
- shown to the respondent after answering the quiz. For example,
- if the correct answer is "False", but they answer "True" (getting
- it wrong) then the "True" feedback is shown.
-</P>
View
23 lang/pt/help/resource/resourcetype.html
@@ -1,23 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Resource Type</B></P>
-
-<P>Resources are any content you can dream up. These are the
- different types, which mostly specify how the content is
- to be accessed:
-
-<P><B>Plain text</B> - the easiest type. You can just type (edit) the page into a form
-on the following page. Some things you type will be automatically formatted, just like
-forum postings. See help on typing text: <?php helpbutton("text", get_string("helptext")) ?>
-
-<P><B>HTML text</B> - for more advanced users. No automatic formatting is performed,
-you need to do it all manually using HTML codes.
-
-<P><B>Reference</B> - a scholarly reference to a journal or book.
-
-<P><B>Uploaded file</B> - displays any file you have uploaded into the course. See the 'Files' section.
-
-<P><B>Web link</B> - A URL to somewhere on the web. When anyone clicks on this resource
-activity they will be taken out of the course (the page you've specified will fill the browser window).
-
-<P><B>Web page</B> - A URL to somewhere on the web. Like the previous type, this
-will display a web page. Unlike the previous type, though, the page will displayed
-within a frame, as if it is integrated within the course.
View
160 lang/pt/help/richtext.html
@@ -1,160 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>About the Richtext HTML editor</B></P>
-
-<P>Availability: <B>
-<?php if (!$CFG->htmleditor) {
- print_string("htmleditordisabledadmin");
- } else if (!$USER->htmleditor) {
- print_string("htmleditordisabled");
- } else if (!can_use_richtext_editor()) {
- print_string("htmleditordisabledbrowser");
- } else {
- print_string("htmleditoravailable");
- }
-?>
-</B></P>
-
-<P>The Richtext HTML editor provides a word-processor interface embedded in your web page to allow you to edit text in an intuitive way, and produces normal HTML code.
-
-<P>In addition to formatting text, this editor provides a number of extra features you may find useful.
-
-<P><B>Paste text in from other Applications</B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>You can cut and paste rich text from other Windows applications such as Microsoft Word
- straight into this editor, and your formatting will be preserved. Just use the normal cut and paste
- menus in your web browser (or Control-C and Control-V).
-</UL>
-
-<P><B>Inserting images <img border="0" hspace="10" src="lib/editor/images/ed_image.gif"></B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>If you have images that are already published on a web site and accessible via a URL, you can include these images in your texts using the "Insert Image" button.
-</UL>
-
-<P><B>Inserting Tables <img border="0" hspace="10" src="lib/editor/images/insert_table.gif"></B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>To add layout to your texts, you can use the "Insert Tables" button in the toolbar.
-</UL>
-
-<P><B>Inserting Links <img border="0" hspace="10" src="lib/editor/images/ed_link.gif"></B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>To make a new link, first type the text that you want to be a link. Then select it and click the link button in the toolbar. Type the URL you want to link to and it's done!
-</UL>
-
-
-<P><B>Inserting smilies (emoticons) <img border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/smiley.gif" width="15" height="15"></B></P>
-<UL>
-<P>To embed these small icons in your text, click on the smiley icon in the toolbar. A dialog will pop up that allows you to select from the following smiley icons. (Alternatively, you can just type the corresponding code straight into your text and it will be converted later when your text is displayed).
-
- <table border="1">
- <tr valign="top">
- <td>
- <table border="0" align="center" cellpadding="10">
- <tr>
- <td><img border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/smiley.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>smile</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>:-)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/biggrin.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>big grin</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>:-D</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/wink.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>wink</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>;-)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/mixed.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>mixed</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>:-/</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/thoughtful.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>thoughtful</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>V-.</FONT></td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/tongueout.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>tongue out</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>:-P</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/cool.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>cool</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>B-)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/approve.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>approve</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>^-)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/wideeyes.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>wide eyes</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>8-)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/surprise.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>surprise</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>8-o</td>
- </tr>
- </table>
- </td>
- <td>
- <table border="0" align="center" cellpadding="10">
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/sad.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>sad</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>:-(</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/shy.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>shy</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>8-.</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/blush.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>blush</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>:-I</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/kiss.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>kisses</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>:-X</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/clown.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>clown</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>:o)</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/blackeye.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>black eye</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>P-|</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/angry.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>angry</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>8-[</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/dead.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>dead</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>xx-P</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/sleepy.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>sleepy</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>|-.</td>
- </tr>
- <tr>
- <td><img alt border="0" hspace="10" src="pix/s/evil.gif" width="15" height="15"></td>
- <td>evil</td>
- <td NOWRAP><FONT FACE=Courier>}-]</td>
- </tr>
- </table>
- </table>
-
-</UL>
-
-
View
20 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/addingacomment.html
@@ -1,20 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Adding a Comment</B></P>
-
-<P>Comments can be added to an assessment to:
-
-<OL>
-<LI>Add additional explaination or clarification to the assessment (by
- the student who assessed the piece of work);
-<LI>Query the statements made in the assessment (by the student whose
- piece of work is being assessed;
-<LI>Try to resolve difficulties which may have arisen during the discussion
- on the assessment (by the teacher);
-</OL>
-<P>The aim of the comments is to try either reach agreement on the
- current assessment or persuade the assessor to revise their assessment.
- This discussion should be undertaken in a reasonable way.
-
-<P>If the work is reassessed then the old comments are discarded and
- are no longer shown with the new assessment.
-
-</P>
View
35 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/agreeassessments.html
@@ -1,35 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Agreement of Assessments</B></P>
-
-<P>A workshop assignment can have either of these characteristics:
-
-<OL>
-<LI>In the submission and assessment phase when the students see the
- assessments made by other students there is no feedback
- from the students who submitted the work to the students who made
- the assessment. There may be feedback from the teacher if the teacher
- choses to grade the student assessments and then the teacher's grades and
- comments will be available to both the student whose work it is and
- to the student who made the assessment. There will be, however,
- be only one way feedback between peers on any one piece of work.
-
-<LI>In the submission and assessment phase the students see the
- assessments made by other students and they are allowed to comment
- on these assessments. They may agree or disagree with the (peer) assessment.
- If they agree with the assessment then the assessment stands and is
- used in the final calculations when determining the peer grade given to
- the particular piece of work. If, however, they do not agree with an
- assessment the student who made the assessment is given an
- opportunity to revise it. The revise/disagree loop can continue until
- either agreement is reached or the deadline is reached. An assessment
- which is still in &quot;dispute&quot; when the deadline is reached
- is not used in the final calculations. This gives two way feedback
- between peers on each piece of work.
-</OL>
-<P>If the second method of working is chosen there is the option of switching off the display
- of grades. That is, if this &quot;hide grades&quot; option is exercised, only the comments
- in the assessment are shown to the student who work is being assessed.
- The grades are shown only after agreement has been reached (on the
- comments alone). Note that this option only effective when agreement on
- assessments is required.
-
-</P>
View
14 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/anonymous.html
@@ -1,14 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Anonymous Grading</B></P>
-
-<P>A peer graded assignment can be graded anonymously. In this
- case the names (and any photos) of the students doing the grading
- are not shown. Only the (file) names of the submissions are used to identify
- the peices of work being graded.
-
-<P>When the peer graded assignment is not graded anonymously, the
- pieces of work are shown with the names (and any photos) of the
- students who submitted the work. This may lead to bias in the gradings.
-
-<P>Note that if the teacher's grades are shown to the students these are
- never shown anonymously.
-</P>
View
21 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/assignmenttype.html
@@ -1,21 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Peer Graded Assignment Type</B></P>
-
-<P>A peer graded assignment can have one of two types:
-
-<OL>
-<LI>Only feedback on the assessment elements and the general comment
- is entered. The grading of assessment elements is not seen in the
- grading pages. Assignments themselves are not given an overall grade.
- However, the grading performance of the students is measured and
- this, and only this measure contributes towards the final grades given
- to the students.
-
-<LI>Here the teacher and peers are asked to provide both feedback and
- grades. The assignments are given an overall quantative grade as well
- as the qualative data. The final grade for a student will be calculated
- from the (weighted) contributions of the teacher's grade, the mean
- peers' grade and the student's grading performance.
-
-</OL>
-
-</P>
View
23 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/breakdownoffinalgrade.html
@@ -1,23 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>The Breakdown of the Final Grade</B></P>
-
-<P>The table on this screen shows your final grade and how it was calculated.
- The final grade is made up from three possible components.
-
-<OL>
-<LI>The teacher's grade for your submitted work.
-<LI>The average of the peer grades for your submitted work.
-<LI>A grade for your performance in the peer grading phase. This
- performance was based by (a) whether your grades were too high or too low
- when compared with the average grade of the other students (this is called bias),
- (b) whether your grades follow, again on average, the grades given by
- the other students (this is called reliability)
- and (c) on the quality of your comments on the other pieces of work you graded.
- This was graded by the teacher. These three performance grades were weighted
- by the factors 1:2:3 respectively to give an overall &quot;grading&quot;
- grade. In other words the teacher's grading of the comments is given the
- same weight as the Bias and Reliability factors combined.
-</OL>
-
-<P>These three components can be weighted as deemed appropriate for the
- assignment. These weights are shown in the smaller table.
-</P>
View
54 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/calculatingfinalgrade.html
@@ -1,54 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>The Calculation of the Final Grade</B></P>
-
-<P>The table on this screen shows how the the final grades for the students
- are calculated. The final grades are a weighted sum of up to five components.
-
-<OL>
-<LI>The teacher's grade for their submitted work. This is optional and will be
- used if the teacher actually assesses the student's work. If the student submits
- more than one peice of work the &quot;best&quot; grade is used. Here, best
- means the piece of work with the highest weighted combination of teacher's
- grade and peer grade...
-<LI>The average of the peer grades for their submitted work. Again if the student
- submits more than one peice of work the &quot;best&quot; grade is used. The
- peer grade can optionally
- include the teacher's grade. This grade would be included if the number of
- peer gradings is very low or it is thought that the peer gradings are suspect
- either because of bias (usually on the high side) or for not being reliable.
- If included the teacher's grade is treated in the same way as a peer grade in
- the calculation of the average.
-<LI>The student's bias in grading peer work. This is measure of whether the
- student grades work either too high or too low. It is not an absolute measure
- as it is based on the difference between the student's grade and the peer
- averages for each of the submissions they assessed. In general this component
- should NOT be given a high weighting.
-<LI>The student's reliability in grading peer work. This is a measure on how well
- a students grades follow the peer average for the peices of work they
- assessed. The measure discounts the student bias and averages the absolute
- differences between their grades and the peer average grades. In theory if
- the students gives high marks for good peices of work and low marks for poor
- pieces of work their reliability will be high. If it is suspected that the students in
- general are poor assessors then the teacher's grades should be included into
- the ppeer averages, this should make the reliability values more meaningful.
-<LI>The average grade given by the teacher for the student's assessments.
- This includes both the preliminary assessments made by the student on the
- example pieces of work and any grading the teacher makes on the asessments
- produced during the peer assessement phase of the assignment. In general this
- component is probably more important than both the Bias and Reliability
- components and thus, if available, should be weighted higher.
-</OL>
-
-<P>These five components can be weighted as deemed appropriate for the
- assignment. For example the teacher's grade might be weighted strongly
- if the peer grading part of the assignment is only considered a minor part
- of the assignment as a whole. Alternatively, if the teacher only grades a few
- of the submissions these grades can be ignored by giving them a zero weighting.
- If the assignment is all about the students as judges and the providing of feedback
- then first two components may be set to zero (or low) and the students'
- grading abilities will determine the final grades.
-
-<P>Note that this screen is used iteratively and the final grades are not normally
- made available to the students until the final phase of the assignment. Once the
- the teacher is happy with the final grades and their weightings then they can
- be made available to the students.
-</P>
View
6 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/editingacomment.html
@@ -1,6 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Editing a Comment</B></P>
-
-<P>As with other items there is a short period of time allowed when
- the text of comments can be amended. The comment is not shown
- on the assessment until this period has elapsed.
-</P>
View
56 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/elements.html
@@ -1,56 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Assignment Elements</B></P>
-
-<P>For ease of grading, a Workshop Assignment should have a reasonable
- number of &quot;Assessment Elements&quot;. Each element should cover
- a particular aspect of the assignment. Typically an assignment will have
- something between 5 to 15 elements for comments and grading, the
- actual number depending on the size and complexity of the assignment. A peer
- assignment with only one element is allowed and has a similar assessment
- strategy to the standard Moodle Assignment.
-
-<P>The type of elements dependent of the assignment's grading strategy.
-
-<P><B>Not Graded.</B> The elements are descriptions of aspects of the assignment.
- The assessor is asked to comment on each of these aspects. As with all the grading
- strategies, there is also an area for general comments.
-
-
-<P><B>Accumulative Grading.</B> The elements have the following three features:
-<OL>
-<LI>The DESCRIPTION of the assessment element. This should clearly state what
- aspect of the assignment is being assessed. If the assessment is qualatative
- it is helpful to give details of what is considered excellent, average
- and poor.
-
-<LI>The SCALE of the assessment element. There are a number of prefined
- scales. These range from simple Yes/No scales, through multipoint scales to
- a full percentage scale. Each element has its own scale which should be choosen
- to fit the number of possible variations for that element. Note that the scale
- does NOT determine the element's importance when calculating the overall
- grade, a two point scale has the same &quot;influence&quot; as a 100 point
- scale if the respective elements have the same weight...
-
-<LI>The WEIGHT of the assessment element. By default the elements are given the same
- importance when calculating the overall grade of the assignment. This can be
- changed by giving the more importance elements a weight greater than one, and
- the less important elements a weight below one. Changing the weights does NOT
- effect the maximum grade, that value is fixed by the Maximum Grade parameter
- of the peer assignment. Weights can be assigned negative values, this is an
- experimental feature.
-</OL>
-<P><B>Error Banded Grading.</B> The elements will normally describe certain items
- or aspects which must be present in the assignment. The assessment is made on the
- present or absence of these items or aspects. The teacher must all set of grade table which
- give the suggested grades when all the items are present, when one is absent, when two are
- absent, etc. If certain items are more important than others then those items can be given
- a weighting greater than one. Minor items can be given a weighting less than one. The
- overall &quot;error count&quot; is a weighted sum of the missing items. The assessor
- can always make a minor adjustment to these suggested grades.
-
-<P><B>Criteria Grading.</B> The elements will give a set of &quot;level&quot; statements
-which can be used to rank the assignment. The statements may be cumulative or they may
-each be self contained. The assessor must decide which statement best fits each piece of
-work. The teacher must also relate each criterion statement with a suggested grade. These
-should normally be in order. The assessor can make a minor adjustment to these
-suggested grades.
-</P>
View
21 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/finalgrades.html
@@ -1,21 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>The Final Grades</B></P>
-
-<P>The table on this screen lists the final grades and their breakdown as shown to
- the students. If there are missing values in the table then it is possible to &quot;go back&quot;
- and add these. In fact, there are two adjustments which can be made to the Final Grades.
-
-<OL>
-<LI>If a teacher's grade needs to be added then the piece of work can be
- graded by going
- to the teacher's Management screen for assignment and clicking on the link &quot;Student
- Submissions for Assessment&quot;. Any otherstanding submissions can be graded. Once this has
- been done then move the assignment back to Phase 3 and re-calculate the Final grades. In a
- similar way any assessments which have not been graded can be graded from the Management
- screen.
-<LI>If it is desired to use a different weighting scheme then the assignment should be moved
- back to Phase 3 and link &quot;Calculate Final Grades&quot; can be clicked and the new
- weights entered. After the grades have been re-calcualted the assignment should be moved
- to Phase 4 to make the new grades available.
-</OL>
-
-</P>
View
14 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/graded.html
@@ -1,14 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>A Graded Peer Assignment</B></P>
-
-<P>This shows the grades and comments made on the submitted piece of
- work. You can if you wish reply to this assessment and choose not to
- accept it (at this stage). If that is the case, please enter your reply in the
- box at the foot of the page giving the reason why you are not happy with
- the assessment. Then click on the button at the foot of the page and
- choose NO when asked whether you are happy with this assessment.
-
-<P>If, on the other hand. you are happy with the assessment simply
- click on the button at the foot of the page and then click on YES when
- asked whether you are happy with this assessment.
-
-</P>
View
32 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/grading.html
@@ -1,32 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Grading of Peer Assignments</B></P>
-
-<P>For ease of grading a Peer Assignment is divided into a number of
- assessment &quot;elements&quot;. Each element covers
- a particular aspect of the assignment. Depending on the type of assessment,
- for each element you should
-<OL>
-<LI>Enter a Grade by clicking in the appropriate button or selecting an appropriate
- number from the drop down menu.
-
-<LI>Enter an explaination of why you gave that grade in the Feedback box. If
- you feel that the reason is obvious then leave the box empty. Note, however,
- that the teacher may look at your assessment and may well query a grade
- if there is no explaination.
-</OL>
-
-<P>In other type of asessments, you are asked to determine if various items
- are present or absent, in others you are asked to choose which statement best
- fits the peice of work. In both of these assignments you can adjust the grade
- somewhat as you see fit.
-
-<P>The last box on this form allows you to make a general comment on the
- work. This should justify your assessment. It should be polite and as far as
- possible constructive. Your assessment will be shown to the student who
- produced the piece of work.
-
-<P>You have a limited period of time, typically half an hour, in which to
- change your mind and alter your grades or comments. Once that period
- is over the person whose work you are assessing is notified about the assessment.
- At that stage you can view your assessment but you cannot change it.
-
-</P>
View
20 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/gradingassessments.html
@@ -1,20 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Grading the Student Assessments</B></P>
-
-<P>This screen is used to enter the teacher's grade for the assessment made
- by the student during the submission and assessment phase of the assignment. A relatively
- simple grading is used, the score out of 20. The treacher can decide what is
- being graded and the relative scores from the instructions given to the students
- before the assignment started. For example, at a higher level the students may be
- required to give critical comments, at an intermediate level the students may be
- required to point out strengths and weaknesses, and at a lower level the students
- may be simply pointing out errors and inaccuracies.
-
-<P>If available the Teacher's own assessment is shown before that of the
- student so an easy comparison can be made. The teacher's own
- comments can act as a kind of benchmark.
-
-<P>The grades of assessment is
- saved by clicking on the apprpriate button at the foot of the page. There is a
- chance to repeat the grading within the &quot;editing&quot; period. Once that
- time has elapsed the grade is made available to the student.
-</P>
View
73 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/gradingstrategy.html
@@ -1,73 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Grading Strategy</B></P>
-
-<P>A workshop assignment is quite flexible in the type of grading scheme used. This can be:
-
-<OL>
-<LI><B>No grading:</B> In this type of assignment the teacher is not
- interested in quantative assessment from the students at all. The students
- make comments of the pieces of works but not grade them. The teacher,
- however, can, if desired, grade the student comments. These
- &quot;grading grades&quot; form the basis of the students' final grades.
- If the teacher does not grade the student assessments then the assignment
- does not have any final grades.
-
-<LI><B>Accumulative grading:</B> This is the default type of grading.
- In this type of assignment the grade of each
- assessment is made up of a number of &quot;assessment elements&quot;.
- Each element should cover
- a particular aspect of the assignment. Typically an assignment will have
- something between 5 to 15 elements for comments and grading, the
- actual number depending on the size and complexity of the assignment. A peer
- assignment with only one element is allowed and has a similar assessment
- strategy to the standard Moodle Assignment.
-
-<P>Elements have the following three features:
-<OL>
-<LI>The DESCRIPTION of the assessment element. This should clearly state what
- aspect of the assignment is being assessed. If the assessment is qualatative
- it is helpful to give details of what is considered excellent, average
- and poor.
-
-<LI>The SCALE of the assessment element. There are a number of prefined
- scales. These range from simple Yes/No scales, through multipoint scales to
- a full percentage scale. Each element has its own scale which should be choosen
- to fit the number of possible variations for that element. Note that the scale
- does NOT determine the element's importance when calculating the overall
- grade, a two point scale has the same &quot;influence&quot; as a 100 point
- scale if the respective elements have the same weight...
-
-<LI>The WEIGHT of the assessment element. By default the elements are given the same
- importance when calculating the overall grade of the assignment. This can be
- changed by giving the more importance elements a weight greater than one, and
- the less important elements a weight below one. Changing the weights does NOT
- effect the maximum grade, that value is fixed by the Maximum Grade parameter
- of the peer assignment. Weights can be assigned negative values, this is an
- experimental feature.
-</OL>
-
-<LI><B>Error Banded Grading:</B> In this type of assignment the submissions are
- graded on a set of Yes/No scales. The grade is determined by the &quot;Grade
- Table &quot; which gives the relationship between the number of
- &quot;errors&quot; and the suggested grade. For example an assignment may have six
- significant items which should be present, the Grade Table will give suggested
- grades if all are present, one is absent, if two are absent, etc. The individual
- items can, if desired, be given weighting factors if some items are more important
- than others. The number of &quot;errors&quot; is a weighted sum of the items not
- present. By default each item is given a weight of one. The grading table is likely
- to be non-linear, for example
- the sugested grades may be 90%, 70%, 50%, 40%, 30%, 20%, 10%, 0%, 0%, 0% for
- an assignment with 10 items.The assessor can adjust the suggested grade by up
- to 20% either way to give the submission's final grade.
-
-<LI><B>Criteria Grading:</B> This is simpliest type of assessment to grade (although
- not necessarily the most straightforward to set up). The submissions are
- graded against a set of criteria statments. The assessor choses which statement
- best fits the piece of work. The grade is determined by a &quot;Criteria
- Table&quot; which gives the suggested grade for each criterion. For example
- an assignment may be set up with, say, five criteria statements and the assessors
- must then choose one of the five statements for each of their assessments. As with
- the Banded assignment the assessor can adjust the suggested grade by up to
- 20% to give the final grade.
-</OL>
-
-</P>
View
13 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/includeself.html
@@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Including Self in the Assignment</B></P>
-
-<P>A peer graded assignment can optionally include the student's own work
- in the set of pieces each student is asked to grade. This will mean that if, say, the
- number of peer assessors is 5, then each student will be asked to grade 6
- pieces of work, one of them being their own work.
-
-<P>If the number of peer assessors is set to zero and the include self option
- is turned on then the assignment becomes a self-graded assignment. This
- may or may not include the teacher's grading depending on whether that
- option is set or not.
-
-</P>
View
4 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/index.html
@@ -1,4 +0,0 @@
-<p>Workshop</p>
-<ul>
- <li>novo m&oacute;dulo em desenvolvimento...
-</ul>
View
58 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/managing.html
@@ -1,58 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Managing a Workshop Assignment</B></P>
-
-<P>A Workshop Assignment is more complex than an ordinary assignment.
- It involves a number of steps or phases. These are
-<OL>
-<LI>The assessment of the assignment should be broken into a number
- of assessment ELEMENTS. This makes the grading of an assignment less
- arbitary and gives the students a framework on which to make assessments.
- The teacher has the role of setting up the assessment elements thus making a
- grading sheet. (See that page for more details.)
-
- <P>With the assessment elements set up the teacher will normally submit a
- small number of example pieces of work. These are practice pieces for the
- students to assess before preparing their own pieces of work. However,
- before the assignment is made available to students, these example
- pieces should be assessed by the teacher. This provides the students
- with not only examples for the assignment but also specimen assessments
- on those examples.
- <P>The submission of example pieces of work by the teacher is optional
- and for certain assignments may not be appropriate.
-
-<LI>The assignment is now opened to the students. If the teacher has set up
- example pieces of work the students can be asked to assess a number of these.
- In this case, the teacher must grade these assessments and the students must
- reach a satisfactory standard before they are allowed submit their own work.
- Here, a &quot;satisfactory standard&quot; has been set at 40%. Once a student
- has &quot;passed&quot; the required number of assessments they are free to
- submit their own work.
- <P>When a student submits a piece of work the teacher can, if desired assess that
- work. This assessment can be incorporated into the student final grade. These
- assessments, if they are required, can take place either during the submission
- phase of the assignment or after the submission deadline.
- <P>If the assignment incorporates peer assessment, students who have submitted
- work are shown other students' work to assess. When they have made an assessment
- their peer can see that assessment (but the other student cannot comment on it.)
- The teacher, however, can, if desired, grade the assessment and that score is taken
- forward towards the student's final grade.
-
-<LI>After the deadline has passed, the teacher moves the assignment to the next phase
- where further submissions and assessments by students are not allowed. The teacher
- can, if wished, grade the peer assessments made by the students. This is not really
- necessary as provided a reason number of assessments have been made on each
- submission the &quot;grading performance&quot; of each student can be
- determined from the relative scores. The teacher now calculates the final grades
- of the students. These final grades are normally made up of three components,
- teacher's grade of the student's work, mean peer grade of the student's work
- and the student's grading performance. The last can include the mean &quot;grading
- grade&quot; entered by the teacher against a student's comments. These three
- components are given weights by the teacher before the calculation of the final
- grades takes place.
-
-<LI>The final phase of the assignment is entered to allow the students to see their
- final grades. The teacher can, be desired, backtrack the assignment to allow some
- adjustment of, say, the weights used in the final grade calculation, the revised
- grades can then be shown to the students.
-</OL>
-
-</P>
View
13 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/nassessmentsofstudentsubmissions.html
@@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Number of Assessments of Student submissions</B></P>
-
-<P>This number determines whether the students are asked to peer assess
- other students' work. If it is
- not zero then each student is offered that number of pieces
- of work from other students. After assessment the originator of the work
- can view the comments and possibly the grade given by their peer.
- (The peer assessment process may be iterative depending on the setting of
- &quot;Agree Assessments&quot; option.) The teacher can also,
- if desired, grade these assessments and those grades can be used in the calculation of
- the final marks. The student is shown the teacher's comments and grade
- for each of their assessments if available.
-</P>
View
10 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/nassessmentsofteachersexamples.html
@@ -1,10 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Number of Assessments of Teacher's Examples</B></P>
-
-<P>This number determines whether the students are asked to assess
- any example peices of work before submitting their own work. If it is
- not zero then each student must assess that number of example pieces
- of work to a satisfactory level. This means that the teacher must grade
- these assessments before the student can submit work. The student is
- shown the teacher's comments and grade for each of their
- assessments.
-</P>
View
15 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/nelements.html
@@ -1,15 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Number of Comments, Elements, Bands or Criteria</B></P>
-
-<P>The number entered here determines how many items will be used in
- the assessments. Depending on the type of grading strategy, this number
- gives the number of comments, assessments elements, bands or criteria
- to be used in the assessments. Typically an assignment will have
- something between 5 to 15 assessment items, the
- actual number depending on the size and complexity of the assignment.
-
-<P>All assessments have a General Comments field. For a &quot;No
- Grading&quot; assignment the value given here determines the
- number of additional comment areas. It can be specified as zero and results
- in the assessment having only a single General Comments area.
-
-</P>
View
30 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/numberofassessors.html
@@ -1,30 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Number of Peer Assessors</B></P>
-
-<P>A peer graded assignment will normally have around 3 to 8 peer
- assessors. That is, in the peer grading phase, each student will be
- asked to grade this number of pieces of work from the other students
- in the class. The larger the assignment is, in terms of content, the
- smaller this number should be, else the grading burden on the
- students becomes onerous. However, each student should see sufficient
- examples to gain an insight into what constitutes a good piece of work
- and a poor piece of work. Further for the grading performance of a
- student to be assessed meaningfully the greater the number of peer
- gradings the better. This performance is unlikely to be valid if only three
- or four gradings are done by each student.
-
-<P>Provided there is enough pieces of work submitted (actually 10 or
- more), the system will allocate each student at least one &quot;good&quot; and
- at least one &quot;poor&quot; piece of work. However, this can only be done if the
- teacher has graded the pieces of work BEORE the allocation of (peer) grading
- work is done. The teacher does NOT, however, have to grade all the
- pieces of work, a sample is sufficient. Further, the teacher's gradings need
- NOT be the final gradings, a preliminary grading is good enough. Note,
- however, that if the option to show teacher's gradings is turned on,
- these gradings will be shown to the students at the end of the submission
- phase.
-
-<P>The number of peer assesors can be zero. In which case the assignment
- becomes either a self-graded assignment if that option is turned on, or
- a normal teacher-graded assignment.
-
-</P>
View
19 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/resubmit.html
@@ -1,19 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Resubmitting assignments</B></P>
-
-<P>By default, students cannot resubmit assignments, they are allowed only one submission.</P>
-
-<P>If you turn this option on, then students will be allowed to submit more than one piece of work
- to this assignment. This may be useful if the teacher wants to encourage students to do better
- work by an iterative process.</P>
-
-<P>The assessment of submissions is allocated on the basis of the number of assessments a piece
- of work has had. Thus new submissions from a student are likely to be candidates for peer
- assessment. However, if a student resubmits a number of pieces of work in quick succession then
- they are all equally likely to be assessed. The assignment does NOT give priority to the newest
- submission.
-
-<P>When the student's final grade is calculated the submission with the highest grade is used. Here
- highest grade means the weighted combination of the teacher's grade and the peer grade if
- both are available.
-
-</P>
View
12 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/selfassessment.html
@@ -1,12 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Self Assessment</B></P>
-
-<P>A workshop assignment can optionally include the student's own work
- in the set of pieces each student is asked to assess. This will mean that if, say, the
- number of student pieces of work each student has to assess is set at 5, then
- each student will be asked to assess 6 pieces of work, one of them being their own work.
-
-<P>If the number of student pieces of work is set to zero and the self assessment option
- is turned on then the assignment becomes a self-graded assignment. This
- may or may not include the teacher's grading depending on the teacher's decision.
-
-</P>
View
15 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/showinggrades.html
@@ -1,15 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Hiding the Display of Grades</B></P>
-
-<P>This option can be used in a workshop assignment where there
- must be agreement between the students on each assessment .
- The default value is to show the student whose work is being
- assessed both the comments and the grades in the peer assessments. This
- may lead to more disputes than when the option is turned on and the
- assessments are shown without the grades.
-
-<P>If the option is taken to hide grades in the peer assessments the
- grades are revealed once agreement has been reached. This agreement
- will, of course, have been made only on the comments. If these comments
- do not reasonably match the grades then the student whose work is being
- assessed may well appeal to the teacher.
-</P>
View
11 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/specimen.html
@@ -1,11 +0,0 @@
-<p align="center"><b>Specimen Assessment Form</b></p>
-
-<p>This page shows shows the details of the actual form used to grade
- your assignment. It will be used by the teacher to grade your work. Further,
- in a peer graded asignment, the same form will be used by yourself and
- your fellow students to grade the submitted pieces of work.</p>
-
-<p>Please note that although you can change the grades on
- this form these changes are NOT saved. This is simply a specimen form,
- but a very similar form will be used by the teacher and possibly by you
- during this assignment.</p>
View
13 lang/pt_br/help/workshop/teachersgradings.html
@@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
-<P ALIGN=CENTER><B>Display of Teacher's Grades</B></P>
-
-<P>A peer graded assignment can optionally make the teacher's comments
- and grades available to the student's. If desired, these are shown after the
- submission deadline, or later if the grades are not available then. The teacher's
- comments and grades may well help the students when making their own
- (peer) assessments on other student's work.
-
-<P>Note that even when the peer grading is done anonymously, the
- teacher's grades are always shown to the students with the teacher's
- name and, if available, their photo.
-
-</P>

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