experiments in human-memorable byte arrays
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remembyte - experiments in human-memorable byte arrays

DISCLAIMER: Much of this is aspirational, all code is alpha at the moment, and until there is a real release, the code might not even build.

The problem: it's really hard to remember 16:27:ac:a5:76:28:2d:36:63:1b:56:4d:eb:df:a6:48 (which happens to represent GitHub's RSA SSH host key fingerprint, at the time of this writing).

remembyte is a set of experients in ways to make this easier. For instance, you might map each byte to emoji, or to an alternating pair of word lists.

This project was born out of a frustration when setting up a new computer for the first time, and a desire to learn some C. For now, it's just for fun.

Features

remembyte is designed to be extensible. Currently it supports connecting to an SSH server and displaying host key fingerprints, or being passed a hex value on the command line. Eventually, it will also support connecting to a TLS server (HTTPS, etc) and displaying TLS certificate fingerprints, being piped a hex value, and possibly being passed a large string containing hex values intermingled with other data that it would parse out.

Its display system is also designed to be extensible. Currently it can display byte array representations of the emoji and PGP wordlist mappings listed above, but eventually I would like to experiment with combinations (noun list, verb list, object list - remember sentences! etc) and other mapping types.

See the todo document for the current status, and a roadmap of planned features.

Building remembyte

There is a default Makefile that may work for you. In that case, simply run make.

If it doesn't, create a new makefile that sets variables and then includes the default makefile, and then tell make to use that file with make -f new_makefile.

See the comments at the top of the default Makefile for more information.

I currently build for clang on Mac OS X and Linux. Eventually, I'd like to find a way to build for multiple platforms and C compilers, including on Windows (for certain) using MSVC (not for certain). I would like to avoid an eldritch ./configure script.

Running remembyte

Run remembyte -h for help.