Watch a directory for changes
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README.md

Watchgopher Build Status

Watchgopher is a small, lightweight tool that listens to file events in directories and dispatches these events (including event type and file) to commands of your choice to handle them.

Getting Started

  1. Make sure you have Watchgopher installed (see the "Installation" section further down for instructions).

  2. Create a configuration file for Watchgopher to use. Modify this example according to your needs and save it:

    {
       "/Users/mrnugget/Downloads": [
          {
            "run": "/Users/mrnugget/bin/unzipper.rb",
            "pattern": "*.zip",
            "log_output": true
          }
       ]
    }
    
  3. Make sure the specified directory to watch exists and the command is executable. Then point watchgopher to your newly created configuration file:

    $ watchgopher watchgopher_config.json

Watchgopher is now keeping track of all files in the /Users/mrnugget/Downloads directory. As soon as something happens to a file, whose name matches the specified pattern, Watchgopher will pass the type of the event and the absolute path to the file to the specified command.

Creating a new *.zip file in /Users/mrnugget/Downloads will follow in Watchgopher calling this command:

/Users/mrnugget/bin/unzipper.rb CREATE /Users/mrnugget/Downloads/new.zip

Check out the examples directory for a config file and an example script to unzip new *.zip files in a folder.

Installation

Binary Releases

Download one of the pre-built binary releases for Linux or OS X (darwin):

Compiling From Source

Make sure you have Go running on your system and setup. Then use the go command to install Watchgopher and its dependencies:

$ go get -u github.com/mrnugget/watchgopher

Usage

Watchgopher will pass two arguments to every specified command, should a file event happen whose filename matches the specified pattern. Those two arguments will be:

  1. Type of the event (CREATE, MODIFY, DELETE or RENAME)
  2. Absolute path of the file triggering the event

To properly use Watchgopher, your specified commands should take care of those arguments and act accordingly. What those scripts will do is entirely up to them. For a more thorough explanation read this blog post.

Configuration

The basic, required pattern of a Watchgopher configuration file is this:

{
  "[PATH OF DIRECTORY TO WATCH]": [
    {"run": "[PATH OF COMMAND HANDLING THE EVENT]", "pattern": "[FILE NAME PATTERN]"},
    {"run": "[PATH OF COMMAND HANDLING THE EVENT]", "pattern": "[FILE NAME PATTERN]"}
  ],
  "[PATH OF DIRECTORY TO WATCH]": [
    {"run": "[PATH OF COMMAND HANDLING THE EVENT]", "pattern": "[FILE NAME PATTERN]"},
    {"run": "[PATH OF COMMAND HANDLING THE EVENT]", "pattern": "[FILE NAME PATTERN]"},
    ...
  ],
  ...
}

[PATH OF DIRECTORY TO WATCH] is the absolute path of a directory which Watchgopher should keep track of.

Every defined directory can have several rules.

Every rule requires two attributes:

  1. run: Absolute path to command which will handle the event. If the command is in your $PATH you won't need to provide the absolute path, just the name of the command.
  2. pattern: Defines which pattern a filename of an event has to match in order to get dispatched to he "run" command. See this for an explanation of possible patterns.

Every rule can use optional attributes:

  1. log_output: Tells Watchgopher whether to log the output of the specified run command or not. If not specified, the default is false. If it's true, then Watchgopher will log the commands STDERR and STDOUT to its logoutput, prefixed with the commands filename.
  2. change_pwd: If this is true (default, when unspecified, is false) Watchgopher changes the working directory of the executed command to the path of the directory to watch.

Whenever an event is triggered in a directory, watchgopher checks which rules apply to this event (by checking against the pattern). If a rule applies, because the defined pattern matches the file events filename, Watchgopher will dispatch the event to the defined command (run).

Thanks

Thanks to howeyc for building the fsnotify package.

License

MIT, see LICENSE