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Thank you!

Really, thank you. Thank you for taking some of your precious time helping the Mule ESB project move forward.

This guide will help you get started with Mule ESB's development environment. You'll also find the set of rules you're expected to follow in order to submit improvements and fixes to Mule ESB.

In this guide you will find:


Before you begin

Mule is a powerful and complex project. Before contributing to the Mule source code, it's important to understand the domain of the enterprose integration, Mule ESB from the user point of view and the different mechanisms to extend Mule.

Getting to know better Mule

There are a number of sources you can use to understand better Mule and its forthcoming features:

Visiting the community meeting points

If you are here reading this document, you probably have already in mind a new feature or a bug fix to work on. This is great, however there could be other members of the communiry with the same idea.

Before you begin, please take a few minutes to review community meeting points to make sure someone else hasn't already taken on your challenge:

  1. Review existing JIRAs to see if a bug has already been logged.
  2. Follow the Mule forum chatter to see if anyone else has begun to resolve the problem or initiate the improvement.
  3. Scan StackOverflow to see if there is already a proposed solution for your problem. If, in the above-listed resources, no-one else has initiated your improvement or fix, log the issue by creating a Mule JIRA. JIRA issues a identifier for your issue; keep this handy as you will use it to create a branch later if you decide to fix it yourself.

Understanding the extension mechanisms

Mule ESB has two different extension mechanisms for writting modules and connectors. Avoiding to add functionality to this project and rather use one of those mechanisms to extend Mule is probably the more favorable option.

It is therefor important to understand those two extension mechanisms. The first and more intuitive mechanism for extensions is the Anypoint Connector DevKit, an annotation based framework for easy construction of extesions. The second choice is to extend mule through the Extensions mechanism.

Now we should undestand Mule and the enterprise integration domain. At the same time we should know the different extension mechanisms of Mule.

Setting up the development environment

While getting ready to contribute to any piece of software we will need to install number of prerequisites, we will need also to obtain the preexisting source code there could be. In this section we will follow some installation steps for the prerequisites and also we will download the source code.

Installing Prerequisites

Before you get started, you need to set yourself up with an environment in which to develop Mule. Your dev environment needs three things: a Java SDK, a recent version of Maven, an integration development environment (IDE), and new branch of code to work on.

JDK

  1. If you are working with Windows or Linux, install one of the following Java Development Kits on your local drive. If you are working on a Mac, simply confirm that the JDK shipped with your Mac OS X the following is Java SE Development Kit 7 (also known as Java SE 7u13) or newer using the command java -version, then skip to step 4 below:
  2. Create an environment variable called JAVA_HOME, setting it to the directory in which you installed the JDK.
  3. Update the PATH environment variable so that it includes the path to JDK binaries. Add the following line to the PATH variable:
    • Windows: %JAVA_HOME%/bin
    • Linux or Mac OS X: $JAVA_HOME/bin
  4. If you are using a Mac OS X, examine the contents of the $JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/ security directory to confirm that the following two files are present:

Maven

  1. Download the Maven distribution from the Maven web site, then unpack it to a convenient folder on your local drive.
  2. Create an environment variable called M2_HOME, then set it to the folder into which you unpacked Maven.
  3. Update the PATH environment variable to include the path to Maven binaries.
    • Windows: add the following line to the PATH variable: %M2_HOME%/bin
    • Mac or Linux: add the following line to the PATH variable: $M2_HOME/bin

Getting the Source Code

Mule source code lives on Github. Complete the following procedure to locate the code and get it onto your local drive.

If you're new to Git, consider reading Pro Git to absorb the basics. Just want a Read-Only version of Mule source code?

  1. Create or log in to your github account.
  2. If you haven't already done so, set up git on your local drive.
  3. Navigate to Mule's github page at: https://github.com/mulesoft/mule.git
  4. Click the Fork button at the top right corner of the page, then select your own git repository into which github inserts a copy of the repository.
  5. Prepare to clone your forked Mule ESB repository from your github account to your local drive via a secure file transfer connection. As per git's recommendation, we advise using HTTPS to transfer the source code files to your local drive. However, if you prefer to establish a secure connection for transferring the files via SSH, follow git's procedure to generate SSH keys.
  6. In the command line, create or navigate to an existing folder on your local drive into which you wish to store your forked clone of Mule source code.
  7. From the command line, execute one of the following:
    • For HTTPS: git clone https://github.com/<yourreponame>/mule
    • For SSH: git clone git@github.com:<username>/<repo-name>.git
  8. Add the upstream repository so that you can pull changes and stay updated with changes to the mule-3.x (i.e. master) branch. From the command line, execute one of the following:
    • For HTTPS: git remote add upstream https://github.com/mulesoft/mule.git
    • For SSH: git remote add upstream git@github.com:mulesoft/mule.git

Understanding the build

This is an excelent moment to read the guide to build Mule. A correct understanding of how the Mule project is organized and build is key for a productive development.

We are ready to develop our improvements. However, instead of doing it manually we may want to configure an IDE for better productivity. We will do it in the next section.

Configuring the IDE

This section offers tips for importing and working on Mule source code in Eclipse or IntelliJ IDEA. There are no restrictions on the type of integration development environment you use to develop Mule, we simply chose to discuss the above-listed three as common IDEs.

Working with Eclipse

An open-source integration development platform, use Eclipse to modify or add to your cloned version of Mule source code.

Importing

  1. Download and install Eclipse on your local drive.
  2. From the command line, in the directory into which you downloaded the Mule source code, enter the following command to generate the classpath and project files for each sub-project: mvn eclipse:eclipse.
  3. Before launching Eclipse, make the Maven repository known in Eclipse using the following command: mvn -Declipse.workspace=/path/to/eclipse/workspace eclipse:configure-workspace.
  4. Launch Eclipse, selecting the workspace you just "mavenized".
  5. Select File > Import.
  6. In the Import wizard, click to expand the General folder, then select Existing Projects into Workspace, then click Next.
  7. In the Select root directory field, use the Browse button to navigate to the directory into which you downloaded the cloned fork of Mule source code from your Github account.
  8. Ensure all Projects are checked, then click Finish. Eclipse imports the mule source code.
  9. Open source code files as you need to edit or add content.
  10. Click the **Save icon to save locally.

Debugging

You can debug following these steps. There is also a more in-depth guide avaiable in the Mule documentation site.

  1. In Eclipse, select Window > Open Perspective > Other..., then select Java to open the Java Perspective.
  2. Select File > New > Java Project. You are creating a new project just for launching Mule.
  3. In the New Java Project wizard, select a Name for your project, such as Mule Launcher, then click Next.
  4. In the Java Settings panel of the wizard, select the Projects tab, then click Add.
  5. Click Select All, then click OK, then Finish.
  6. In the Package Explorer, right click your launcher project's name, then select Debug As > Debug Configurations...
  7. In the Debug Configurations wizard, double-click Java Application.
  8. In the Main class field, enter the following content: org.mule.MuleServer
  9. Click the Arguments tab. In the Program Arguments field, enter the following content: -config <path to a Mule config>
  10. Click Apply, then click Debug.
  11. Eclipse requests permission to switch to the Debug Perspective; click Yes to accept and open.

You can now set breakpoints anywhere in any of the Java files in any of the Mule projects in the workspace. When you change java files and rebuild, the debugger hot swaps the rebuilt Java class file to the running Mule server. Note that you only need to follow the procedure above to set your Debug configurations once; thereafter, simply right-click the project name, then select Debug As > Java Application for subsequent debugging.

Debugging Remotely

  1. From the command line, edit the JPDA_OPTS variable in the Mule startup script and specify the debugger port.
  2. Start the Mule server with the -debug switch. The server waits until a debugger attaches.
  3. In the Package Explorer in studio, right-click your Mule source code project's name, then select Debug > Debug Configurations...
  4. Double-click Remote Java Application.
  5. Under Connection Properties, enter a value for Host and Port, then click Apply.
  6. Click Debug. Eclipse requests permission to switch to the Debug Perspective; click Yes to accept and open.

Testing

Use Maven to run unit test on your project using the following command: mvn test.

In addition to the unit tests for each sub-project, the Mule parent project has a separate sub-project containing integration tests. These tests verify "macroscopic" functionality that could not be tested by any single sub-project alone.

Setting Eclipse Startup Parameters

The table below lists a number of command-line parameters you can use to alter Eclipse's startup behavior, if you wish.

Parameter Action
-clean enables clean registration of plug-in (some plug-ins do not always register themselves properly after a restart)
-nosplash does not show Eclipse or plug-in splash screens
-showLocation allows you to explicitly set which JDK to use
-vm examples that come with the full Mule distribution
-vmargs allows you to pass in standard VM arguments

Working with IntelliJ IDEA

Use IntelliJ's IDEA integration platform to modify or add to your cloned Mule source code.

Importing

  1. Download and install IntelliJ IDEA.
  2. Open IDEA, then select File > Open...
  3. Browse to the directory into which you downloaded the Mule source code, then select the pom.xml file.
  4. Click OK. IDEA takes awhile to process all the pom.xml files.
  5. Set the correct source for the JDK on your local drive. Right click the mule-transport-jdbc directory, then select Module Settings > Sources > src > main > jdk6 or jdk7. Repeat this step for test sources, as tests.
Troubleshooting

If you IDEA presents any compilation errors in test classes from the CXF module when you create the project, it is safe to ignore them. Those classes depend on some test classes generated by the Maven build during execution. Right click the error message, then select Exclude from compile. Alternatively, you can run mvn install from the command line to fix the errors.

Debugging Remotely

You can debug following these steps. There is also a more in-depth guide avaiable in the Mule documentation site.

  1. Start the Mule server with the -debug switch. The server waits until a debugger attaches.
  2. In IDEA, select Run > Edit Configurations... to open the Run/Debug Configurations window.
  3. Click Add New Configuration (plus sign), then select Remote.
  4. Enter a name for the configuration, then update the host and port values if required (You can use the default values, localhost:5005, for debugging a local mule instance).
  5. Click OK to start the debugging session.

Testing

Use Maven to run unit tests on your project using the following command: mvn test.

In addition to the unit tests for each sub-project, the Mule parent project has a separate sub-project containing integration tests. These tests verify "macroscopic" functionality that could not be tested by any single sub-project alone.

We finally have everything ready to start writting code. Lets start with the code and also learn how to commit it in the next section.

Developing your contribution

Working directly on the master version of Mule source code would likely result in merge conflicts with the original master. Instead, as a best practice for contributing to source code, work on your project in a feature branch.

Creating your feature branch

In order to create our feature branch we should follow these steps:

  1. From your local drive, create a new branch in which you can work on your bug fix or improvement using the following command: git branch yourJIRAissuenumber.
  2. Switch to the new branch using the followcing ommand: git checkout yourJIRAissuenumber.

Now we should be able to make our very first compilation of the Mule ESB source code. We just need to instruct Maven to download all the dependent libraries and compile the project, you can do so execution the following command Within the directory into which you cloned the Mule source code: mvn -DskipTests install.

Note that if this is your first time using Maven, the download make take several minutes to complete.

** Windows and the local Maven repository **
In Windows, Maven stores the libraries in the .m2 repository in your home directory. For example, C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\.m2\repository. Because Java RMI tests fail where a directory name includes spaces, you must move the Maven local repository to a directory with a name that does not include spaces, such as %M2_HOME%/conf or %USERPROFILE%/.m2

Now that you're all set with a local development environment and your own branch of Mule source code, you're ready get kicking! The following steps briefly outline the development lifecycle to follow to develop and commit your changes in preparation for submission.

  1. If you are using an IDE, make sure you read the previous section about IDE configuration.
  2. Review the Mule Coding Style documentation to ensure you adhere to source code standards, thus increasing the likelihood that your changes will be merged with the mule-3.x (i.e. master) source code.
  3. Import the Mule source code project into your IDE (if you are using one), then work on your changes, fixes or improvements.
  4. Debug and test your local version, resolving any issues that arise.
  5. Save your changes locally.
  6. Prepare your changes for a Pull Request by first squashing your changes into a single commit on your branch using the following command: git rebase -i mule3.x.
  7. Push your squashed commit to your branch on your github repository. Refer to Git's documentation for details on how to commit your changes.
  8. Regularly update your branch with any changes or fixes applied to the mule-3.x branch. Refer to details below.

Updating Your feature Branch

To ensure that your cloned version of Mule source code remains up-to-date with any changes to the mule-3.x (i.e. master) branch, regularly update your branch to rebase off the latest version of the master.

  1. Pull the latest changes from the "upstream" master mule-3.x branch using the following commands:
git fetch upstream
git fetch upstream --tags 
  1. Ensure you are working with the master branch using the following command:
git checkout mule-3.x
  1. Merge the latest changes and updates from the master branch to your feature branch using the following command:
git merge upstream/mule-3.x
  1. Push any changes to the master to your forked clone using the following commands:
git push origin mule-3.x
git push origin --tags
  1. Access your feature branch once again (to continue coding) using the following command:
git checkout dev/yourreponame/bug/yourJIRAissuenumber
  1. Rebase your branch from the latest version of the master branch using the following command:
git rebase mule-3.x
  1. Resolve any conflicts on your feature branch that may appear as a result of the changes to mule-3.x (i.e. master).
  2. Push the newly-rebased branch back to your fork on your git repository using the following command:
git push origin dev/yourreponame/bug/yourJIRAissuenumber -f

Submitting a Pull Request

Ready to submit your patch for review and merging? Initiate a pull request in github!

  1. Review the MuleSoft Contributor's Agreement. Before any contribution is accepted, we need you to run the following notebook script . This script will ask you to login to github and accept our Contributor's Agreement. That process creates an issue in our contributors project with your name.
  2. From the repo of your branch, click the Pull Request button.
  3. In the Pull Request Preview dialog, enter a title and optional description of your changes, review the commits that form part of your pull request, then click Send Pull Request (Refer to github's detailed instructions for submitting a pull request).
  4. Mule's core dev team reviews the pull request and may initiate discussion or ask questions about your changes in a Pull Request Discussion. The team can then merge your commits with the master where appropriate. We will validate acceptance of the agreement at this step.
  5. If you have made changes or corrections to your commit after having submitted the pull request, go back to the Pull Request page and update the Commit Range (via the Commits tab), rather than submitting a new pull request.

Summary

This guide started with pointing to different sources of information around Mule and the Mule's community meeting points on the net. These were useful to understand were Mule is moving to and to have contact mechanisms with the rest of the community for help or discussion.

In order to set up our development environment we got to install some prerequisites. Once we had them ready, we downloaded the source code.

At that point we were almost ready to develop improvements, we just needed to configured our favourite IDE to develop or debug Mule code.

Then we were finally ready to develop our contribution. We created our very own feature branch were we'll develop our improvement, then we learnt how to keep it updated in order to be able to submit a pull request to the main Mule ESB repository

Thank you one more time for taking some time understanding how to contribute to Mule ESB.

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