Permalink
Browse files

Fix minor typos

  • Loading branch information...
1 parent 3752e73 commit 3af476719417cfc731f2d7330121f5ab5a8795ae @vhennebert vhennebert committed Jul 5, 2012
Showing with 20 additions and 20 deletions.
  1. +20 −20 article.html
View
@@ -1194,7 +1194,7 @@
<a name="binding">The</a> <code>binding</code> macro
is similar to <code>let</code>,
but it gives new, thread-local values
- to existing global bindings throughout the scopes
+ to existing global bindings throughout the scope's
thread of execution.
The values of Vars bound within the <code>let</code>
vector argument are also used in functions, if they use
@@ -2412,7 +2412,7 @@
which takes one or more values.
</p>
<p>
- There are two ways invoke a static method in a Java class,
+ There are two ways to invoke a static method in a Java class,
shown in the examples below:
</p>
<div class="code">
@@ -2438,7 +2438,7 @@
</pre>
</div>
<p>
- There are two ways invoke an instance method on a Java object,
+ There are two ways to invoke an instance method on a Java object,
shown in the examples below:
</p>
<div class="code">
@@ -3087,12 +3087,12 @@
</p>
<p>
Many Clojure functions return a lazy sequence.
- This is sequence whose items can be the result of function calls
+ This is a sequence whose items can be the result of function calls
that aren't evaluated until they are needed.
A benefit of creating a lazy sequence is that it isn't
necessary to anticipate how many items in it will
actually be used at the time the sequence is created.
- Examples of functions that return lazy sequences include:
+ Examples of functions and macros that return lazy sequences include:
<code>cache-seq</code>, <code>concat</code>, <code>cycle</code>,
<code>distinct</code>, <code>drop</code>, <code>drop-last</code>,
<code>drop-while</code>, <code>filter</code>, <code>for</code>,
@@ -3165,7 +3165,7 @@
when the evaluation results need to be retained.
It holds the head of the sequence
which causes the results to be cached
- and it return the evaluated sequence.
+ and it returns the evaluated sequence.
</p>
<p>
The table below illustrates the options for
@@ -3413,7 +3413,7 @@
instead of printing to <code>*out*</code>.
</p>
<p>
- The <code>printf</code> function similar to <code>print</code>,
+ The <code>printf</code> function is similar to <code>print</code>,
but uses a format string.
The <code>format</code> function is similar to <code>printf</code>,
but prints to a string that is returned
@@ -3466,7 +3466,7 @@
The <code>slurp</code> function reads the entire contents of a file
into a string and returns it.
The <code>spit</code> function
- which writes a string to a given file and closes it.
+ writes a string to a given file and closes it.
</p>
<p>
This article only scratches the surface
@@ -3504,7 +3504,7 @@
</div>
<p>
The ampersand character can be used with destructuring
- to capturing the remaining items in a collection. For example:
+ to capture the remaining items in a collection. For example:
</p>
<div class="code">
<pre xml:space="preserve">
@@ -3779,13 +3779,13 @@
</p>
<h3>Some Fine Print</h3>
<p>
- <code>Symbol</code> objects have a <code>String</code> name and
+ A <code>Symbol</code> object has a <code>String</code> name and
a <code>String</code> namespace name (called <code>ns</code>),
but no value.
The fact that it uses a String namespace name
instead of a <code>Namespace</code> object reference
- allows it to be a namespace that doesn't yet exist.
- <code>Var</code> objects have references to
+ allows it to be in a namespace that doesn't yet exist.
+ A <code>Var</code> objects has references to
a <code>Symbol</code> object (called <code>sym</code>),
a <code>Namespace</code> object (called <code>ns</code>)
and an <code>Object</code> object which is its "root value"
@@ -3865,7 +3865,7 @@
<code>:name</code> is a <code>Symbol</code>
that provides a name for the Var.
<code>:ns</code> is a <code>Namespace</code> object
- that the describes the namespace
+ that describes the namespace
in which the Var is defined.
<code>:macro</code> is a boolean that indicates
whether a Var is a macro
@@ -3979,7 +3979,7 @@
whose arguments are its conditions and return values.
The <code>let</code> special form is used here for efficiency
in the event that the first parameter, <code>number</code>,
- is passed as an expression instead of simple value.
+ is passed as an expression instead of a simple value.
It evaluates <code>number</code> once and then
uses its value in two places within the <code>cond</code>.
The auto-gensym <code>number#</code> is used to
@@ -4531,7 +4531,7 @@
The <code>ref-set</code> function changes
the in-transaction value of a Ref and returns it.
It must be called inside a transaction, otherwise
- an <code>IllegalStateException</code> is throw.
+ an <code>IllegalStateException</code> is thrown.
The change will only be visible outside the transaction
if and when the transaction commits.
This happens when a <code>dosync</code> exits
@@ -5017,7 +5017,7 @@
If the <code>send</code> or <code>send-off</code> functions
are invoked from inside a transaction,
the action isn't actually sent until the transaction commits.
- This is somewhat similar to the calling
+ This is somewhat similar to calling
the <code>commute</code> function on a Ref in the sense that
the calls that determine the value to retain
occur at the end of the transaction.
@@ -5382,10 +5382,10 @@
</div>
<p>
Another important feature of the test library is fixtures.
- They are code that wraps execution of test methods.
+ They are code that wraps the execution of test methods.
Fixtures come in two varieties,
those that wrap the execution of each test method and
- those that wrap execution of the entire run of test methods.
+ those that wrap the execution of the entire run of test methods.
</p>
<p>
To create a fixture, write a function that follows this pattern:
@@ -5693,7 +5693,7 @@
that support capabilities beyond what is in Clojure proper
have been contributed.
Some of these that were not discussed earlier are summarized below.
- In addition, many the known libraries are described at
+ In addition, many of the known libraries are described at
<a href="http://clojure.org/libraries">http://clojure.org/libraries</a>.
</p>
<ul>
@@ -5753,7 +5753,7 @@
of Lisp dialects appealing?</li>
</ul>
<p>
- If you answered "yes" some of these questions then you should
+ If you answered "yes" to some of these questions then you should
consider using Clojure as your next programming language.
</p>

0 comments on commit 3af4767

Please sign in to comment.