No description, website, or topics provided.
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
pypki2
pypki2config
pypki2pip
tests
.gitignore
LICENSE
README.md
mypki.example
setup.cfg
setup.py

README.md

pypki2

pypki2 attempts to make it a bit easier to access PKI-enabled services with Python. Conceptually, this is very similar to the Ruby MyPKI package, and is intended to use the same ~/.mypki configuration file.

There are two modes where pypki2 can be used: unpatched and patched.

Unpatched Mode (Config Mode)

Unpatched mode in pypki2 mainly provides convenience functions around the .mypki config.

Get an SSLContext

If you have your own code and you just want to pass along an SSLContext based on the .mypki config (eg. for urlopen(), or for the requests package), then all you have to do is the following:

import pypki2config
ctx = pypki2config.ssl_context()
resp = urlopen(https_url, context=ctx)
...

You can override the protocol with the following. The default is PROTOCOL_SSLv23.

import pypki2config
import ssl
ctx = pypki2config.ssl_context(protocol=ssl.PROTOCOL_SSLv3)  # SSLv3 not recommended
...

Patched Mode

Patched mode in pypki2 basically "monkey-patches" the built-in HTTPSConnection class with a new loader that uses the PKI configuration in ~/.mypki. If the .mypki file is missing, or the paths to the PKI files are missing from .mypki, then the user is prompted and the values are stored for future use; ideally the user should only have to deal with this once. Likewise, the user is prompted for their PKI password, which only resides in memory and is never placed in permanent storage (nor should it be).

All it takes to activate patched mode is the following code:

import pypki2

You can turn patch mode off with:

pypki2.unpatch()

And you can turn patch mode back on again with:

pypki2.patch()

You can check if patch mode is enabled with:

pypki2.is_patched()

Note that patch(), unpatch(), and is_patched() are not even remotely thread-safe. If you're doing creative things with threads, it's probably best to use unpatched mode and explicitly pass SSLContext objects.

Patched Mode Examples

Simply fetching a URL

The most basic form of request can just use urlopen. Python automatically uses the HTTPSConnection for URL's that start with https:, so you don't have to do anything special after you import pypki2.

Python 3.4+
import pypki2

from urllib.request import urlopen

resp = urlopen('https://your.pki.enabled.website/path/to/whatever')
print(str(resp.read(), encoding='utf-8'))
Python 2.7.9+
import pypki2

from urllib2 import urlopen

resp = urlopen('https://your.pki.enabled.website/path/to/whatever')
print(resp.read())

Sending requests to more complex PKI-enabled services

Some more complex services use cookies to track PKI sessions, so you have to add support for cookies in your URL opener. Thankfully, this is fairly straight forward. Notice that the HTTPSHandler does not require any parameters because it uses HTTPSConnection, which has been overwridden by pypki2.

Python 3.4+
import pypki2

from urllib.request import build_opener, HTTPCookieProcessor, HTTPSHandler, Request

opener = build_opener(HTTPCookieProcessor(), HTTPSHandler())
req = Request('https://your.other.pki.enabled.website/path/to/whatever')
resp = opener.open(req)
print(str(resp.read(), encoding='utf-8'))
Python 2.7.9+
import pypki2

from urllib2 import build_opener, HTTPCookieProcessor, HTTPSHandler, Request

opener = build_opener(HTTPCookieProcessor(), HTTPSHandler())
req = Request('https://your.other.pki.enabled.website/path/to/whatever')
resp = opener.open(req)
print(resp.read())

High Performance Connections

In some cases where you'll be communicating with a server at high speed, it can be helpful to hold onto your HTTPSConnection object rather than reconnecting each time. Since pypki2 simply overrides the SSLContext creation and leaves everything else alone, you can still use HTTPSConnections directly as documented in Python standard library reference. It's also worth mentioning that by default, Python sets the protocol to HTTP 1.1, which is suitable for connection reuse. Examples follow...

Python 3.4+
from http.client import HTTPSConnection
import pypki2

my_connection = HTTPSConnection('your.pki.enabled.service')
my_queries = [ ... ]
my_results = []

for query in my_queries:
    my_connection.request('GET', '/rest/endpoint/'+query, headers={'accept': 'application/json'})

    try:
        resp = my_connection.getresponse()
    except Exception as e:
        print(e)
        break

    my_results.append(resp.read())

my_connection.close()
Python 2.7.9+
from httplib import HTTPSConnection
import pypki2

my_connection = HTTPSConnection('your.pki.enabled.service')
my_queries = [ ... ]
my_results = []

for query in my_queries:
    my_connection.request('GET', '/rest/endpoint/'+query, headers={'accept': 'application/json'})

    try:
        resp = my_connection.getresponse()
    except Exception as e:
        print(e)
        break

    my_results.append(resp.read())

my_connection.close()

Overriding the protocol

Some recalcitrant servers require a very specific SSL protocol version. For these difficult times, pypki2 allows you to pass a specific protocol via the context keyword passed to ssl.SSLContext. Note that pypki2 will create a new SSLContext instance containing your PKI info, but it will use the protocol you specified in the SSLContext instance you created to pass to HTTPSHandler. This makes more sense in the examples below...

Python 3.4+
import pypki2
import ssl

from urllib.request import build_opener, HTTPCookieProcessor, HTTPSHandler, Request

opener = build_opener(HTTPCookieProcessor(), HTTPSHandler(context=ssl.SSLContext(ssl.PROTOCOL_SSLv3))
req = Request('https://your.difficult.pki.enabled.server/path/you/really/need')
resp = opener.open(req)
print(str(resp.read(), encoding='utf-8'))
Python 2.7.9+
import pypki2
import ssl

from urllib2 import build_opener, HTTPCookieProcessor, HTTPSHandler, Request

opener = build_opener(HTTPCookieProcessor(), HTTPSHandler(context=ssl.SSLContext(ssl.PROTOCOL_SSLv3))
req = Request('https://your.difficult.pki.enabled.server/path/you/really/need')
resp = opener.open(req)
print(resp.read())

pip Wrapper

This package also provides a wrapper for pip's main() function, which can be useful when you need to install packages from within your code. Note that this feature only works if you have the OpenSSL package available. Here's an example:

import pip
import pypki2pip

index_url = 'https://your.pki.enabled.pip.server/simple/'
extra_index_url = 'http://pypi.python.org/pypi/'
trusted_host = 'pypi.python.org'
package_name = 'awesomepackage'

pypki2pip.pip([
    'install',
    '-vvv',
    '--index-url={0}'.format(index_url),
    '--extra-index-url={0}'.format(extra_index_url),
    '--trusted-host={0}'.format(trusted_host),
    '--user',
    '--allow-external={0}'.format(package_name),
    '--timeout=30',
    '--retries=20',
    '--allow-unverified={0}'.format(package_name),
    package_name
])

Pypki2pip will automatically fill in the --client-cert= and --cert= parameters with info from your .mypki file. You'll only have to enter your PKI password once; normally pip requires you do enter your password multiple times as it steps through the installation transactions with the server.

Windows Configuration

Since Windows does not define a standard HOME environment variable, you must set the MYPKI_CONFIG environment variable in Control Panel yourself. It needs to define a location where pypki2 can store a configuration file. For example, many corporate environments have a network drive for each user, such as H:\ or M:\johndoe\private. Just set MYPKI_CONFIG to the path for your particular environment. You can find the environment variable dialog box by searching for 'environment' in the Control Panel window.

Note: On Linux/MacOS, you can set MYPKI_CONFIG if you want pypki2 to store your .mypki configuration file somewhere other than your HOME directory.