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ngIRCd - Next Generation IRC Server
http://ngircd.barton.de/
(c)2001-2013 Alexander Barton and Contributors.
ngIRCd is free software and published under the
terms of the GNU General Public License.
-- Commands.txt --
This file lists all commands available on ngIRCd. It is written in a format
that is human readable as well as machine parseable and therefore can be used
as "help text file" of the daemon.
In short, the daemon reads this file on startup and parses it as following
when an user issues a "HELP <cmd>" command:
1. Search the file for a line "- <cmd>",
2. Output all subsequent lines that start with a TAB (ASCII 9) character
to the client using NOTICE commands, treat lines containing a single "."
after the TAB as empty lines.
3. Break at the first line not starting with a TAB character.
This format allows to have information to each command stored in this file
which will not be sent to an IRC user requesting help which enables us to
have additional annotations stored here which further describe the origin,
implementation details, or limits of the specific command which are not
relevant to an end-user but administrators and developers.
A special "Intro" block is returned to the user when the HELP command is
used without a command name:
- Intro
This is ngIRCd, a server software for Internet Relay Chat (IRC)
networks. You can find more information about ngIRCd on its homepage:
<http://ngircd.barton.de>
.
Use "HELP COMMANDS" to get a list of all available commands and
"HELP <command-name>" to get help for a specific IRC command, for
example "HELP quit" or "HELP privmsg".
Connection Handling Commands
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
- CAP
CAP LS
CAP LIST
CAP REQ <capabilities>
CAP ACK <capabilities>
CAP NAK <capabilities>
CAP CLEAR
CAP END
.
List, request, and clear "IRC Capabilities".
.
Using this command, an IRC client can request additional "IRC
capabilities" during login or later on, which influences the
communication between server and client. Normally, these commands
aren't directly used by humans, but automatically by their client
software. And please note that issuing such commands manually can
irritate the client software used, because of the "non-standard"
behavior of the server!
.
- CAP LS: list all available capabilities.
- CAP LIST: list active capabilities of this connection.
- CAP REQ: Request particular capabilities.
- CAP ACK: Acknowledge a set of capabilities to be enabled/disabled.
- CAP NAK: Reject a set of capabilities.
- CAP CLEAR: Clear all set capabilities.
- CAP END: Indicate end of capability negotiation during login,
ignored in an fully registered session.
Please note that the <capabilities> must be given in a single
parameter but whitespace separated, therefore a command could look
like this: "CAP REQ :capability1 capability2 capability3" for example.
References:
- <http://ircv3.net/specs/core/capability-negotiation-3.1.html>
- <http://ngircd.barton.de/doc/Capabilities.txt>
- doc/Capabilities.txt
- CHARCONV
CHARCONV <client-charset>
.
Set client character set encoding to <client-charset>.
.
After receiving such a command, the server translates all message
data received from the client using the set <client-charset> to the
server encoding (UTF-8), and all message data which is to be sent to
the client from the server encoding (UTF-8) to <client-charset>.
.
This enables older clients and clients using "strange" character sets
to transparently participate in channels and direct messages to
clients using UTF-8, which should be the default today.
References:
- IRC+, <http://ngircd.barton.de/doc/Protocol.txt>
- IRC+, doc/Protocol.txt
- NICK
NICK <nickname>
NICK <nickname> [<hops>]
NICK <nickname> <hops> <username> <host> <servertoken> <usermodes> <realname>
.
Set or change the <nickname> of a client (first form) and register
remote clients (second and third form; servers only).
References:
- RFC 1459, 4.1.2 "Nick message" (old client and server protocol)
- RFC 2812, 3.1.2 "Nick message" (client protocol)
- RFC 2813, 4.1.3 "Nick" (server protocol)
- PASS
PASS <password>
PASS <password> <version> <flags> [<options>]
.
Set a connection <password>. This command must be the first command
sent to the server, even before the NICK/USER or SERVER commands.
.
The first form is used by user sessions or (old) RFC 1459 servers,
the second form is used by RFC 2812 or IRC+ compliant servers and
enables the server to indicate its version and supported protocol
features.
References:
- RFC 1459, 4.1.1 "Password message" (old client and server protocol)
- RFC 2812, 3.1.1 "Password message" (client protocol)
- RFC 2813, 4.1.1 "Password message" (server protocol)
- IRC+, <http://ngircd.barton.de/doc/Protocol.txt>
- IRC+, doc/Protocol.txt
- PING
PING <token> [<target>]
.
Tests the presence of a connection to a client or server.
.
If no <target> has been given, the local server is used. User clients
can only use other servers as <target>, no user clients.
.
A PING message results in a PONG reply containing the <token>, which
can be arbitrary text.
Please note:
The RFCs state that the <token> parameter is used to specify the
origin of the PING command when forwarded in the network, but this
is not the case: the sender is specified using the prefix as usual,
and the parameter is used to identify the PONG reply in practice.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.7.2 "Ping message"
- PONG
PONG <target> [<token>]
.
Reply to a "PING" command, indicate that the connection is alive.
.
The <token> is the arbitrary text received in the "PING" command and
can be used to identify the correct PONG sent as answer.
.
When the "PONG" command is received from a user session, the <target>
parameter is ignored; otherwise the PONG is forwarded to this client.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.7.3 "Pong message"
- QUIT
QUIT [<quit-message>]
.
Terminate a user session.
.
When received from a user, the server acknowledges this by sending
an "ERROR" message back to the client and terminates the connection.
.
When a <quit-message> has been given, it is sent to all the channels
that the client is a member of when leaving.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.1.7 "Quit"
- RFC 2813, 4.1.5 "Quit"
- USER
USER <username> <hostname> <unused> <realname>
.
Register (and authenticate) a new user session with a short <username>
and a human-readable <realname>.
.
The parameter <hostname> is only used when received by an other server
and ignored otherwise; and the parameter <unused> is always ignored.
But both parameters are required on each invocation by the protocol
and can be set to arbitrary characters/text when not used.
.
If <username> contains an "@" character, the full <username> is used
for authentication, but only the first part up to this character is
set as "user name" for this session.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.1.3 "User message"
- WEBIRC
WEBIRC <password> <username> <hostname> <ip-address>
.
Allow Web-to-IRC gateway software (for example) to set the correct
user name and host name of users instead of their own.
.
It must be the very first command sent to the server, even before
USER and NICK commands!
.
The <password> must be set in the server configuration file to prevent
unauthorized clients to fake their identity; it is an arbitrary string.
References:
- IRC+, <http://ngircd.barton.de/doc/Protocol.txt>
- IRC+, doc/Protocol.txt
General Commands
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
- AWAY
AWAY [<message>]
.
Provides the server with a message to automatically send in reply to a
PRIVMSG directed at the user, but not to a channel they are on.
.
If <message> is omitted, the away status is removed.
References:
- RFC 2812, 4.1 "Away"
- HELP
HELP [<command>]
.
Show help information for a specific IRC <command>. The <command> name
is case-insensitive.
.
Use the command "HELP Commands" to get a list of all available commands.
The HELP command isn't specified by any RFC but implemented by most
daemons. If no help text could be read in, ngIRCd outputs a list of all
implemented commands when receiving a plain "HELP" command as well as
on "HELP Commands".
ngIRCd replies using "NOTICE" commands like ircd 2.10/2.11; other
implementations are using numerics 704, 705, and 706.
- MODE
MODE <nickname> [{+|-}<mode>[<mode>] [{+|-}<mode>[<mode>] [...]]]
MODE <channel> [{+|-}<mode>[<mode>] [<arg> [<arg> [...]]] [{+|-}<mode>[<mode>] [<arg> [<arg> [...]]] [...]]]
.
Set and get user and channel modes.
.
When no mode parameters are given, the currently set user or channel
modes are returned. Otherwise the modes are adjusted accordingly
and the changes will be reported back to the client.
.
All user and channel "modes" are indicated by single case-sensitive
characters.
.
Please note that a user can only get and set his own modes, and not
all user "levels" are allowed to change all channel modes ...
.
The mode parameters can become quite complex, especially when dealing
with channel modes that require additional arguments:
.
{+|-}<mode(s}> -- set or unset one or more modes.
+<mode(s)> -<mode(s)> -- set some modes and unset others.
+<modes> <arg1> <arg2> -- set (at least) two modes with arguments.
.
Some examples:
.
MODE nick +i -- set user to "invisible".
MODE #chan +tn -- set "topic lock" and "no external messages".
MODE #chan -t +l 50 -- remove "topic lock", set "user limit" to 50.
MODE #chan +ov nick1 nick2 -- set "channel op" and "voice" mode
to nick1 and nick2 in channel #chan.
.
A complete list of all modes supported by ngIRCd can be found online
here: <http://ngircd.barton.de/doc/Modes.txt>.
References:
- RFC 2811, 4. "Channel Modes"
- RFC 2812, 3.1.5 "User mode message"
- RFC 2812, 3.2.3 "Channel mode message"
- <http://ngircd.barton.de/doc/Modes.txt>
- doc/Modes.txt
- NOTICE
NOTICE <target>[,<target>[,...]] <message>
.
Send a <message> to a given <target>, which can be a user or a
channel, but DON'T report any error.
.
The "NOTICE" command exactly behaves like the "PRIVMSG" command, but
doesn't report any errors it encounters (like an unknown <target>).
Please see the help text of the "PRIVMSG" command for a detailed
description of the parameters!
References:
- RFC 2812, 2.3.1 "Message format in Augmented BNF"
- RFC 2812, 3.3 "Sending messages"
- RFC 2812, 3.3.2 "Notice"
- PRIVMSG
PRIVMSG <target>[,<target>[,...]] <message>
.
Send a <message> to a given <target>, which can be a user or a
channel, and report all errors.
.
The <target> must follow one of these syntax variants:
.
- <nickname>
- <channel>
- <user>[%<host>]@<server>
- <user>%<host>
- <nickname>!<user>@<host>
.
If the <target> is a user, a private message is sent directly to this
user; if it resolves to a channel name, a public message is sent
to all the members of that channel.
.
In addition, IRC Ops can use these two forms to specify the <target>:
.
- #<hostmask>
- $<servermask>
.
The <mask> can contain the wildcard characters "*" and "?", but must
contain at least one dot (".") and no wildcard after the last one.
Then, the <message> is sent to all users matching this <mask>.
.
All warnings and errors are reported back to the initiator using
numeric status codes, which is the only difference to the "NOTICE"
command, which doesn't report back any errors or warnings at all.
.
Please note that clients often use "MSG" as an alias to PRIVMSG, and
a command "QUERY <nick> [<message>]" to initiate private chats. Both
are command extensions of the client and never sent to the server.
References:
- RFC 2812, 2.3.1 "Message format in Augmented BNF"
- RFC 2812, 3.3 "Sending messages"
- RFC 2812, 3.3.1 "Private messages"
Status and Informational Commands
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
- ADMIN
ADMIN [<target>]
.
Show administrative information about an IRC server in the network.
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to
a specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network.
The server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.4.9 "Admin command"
- INFO
INFO [<target>]
.
Show the version, birth & online time of an IRC server in the network.
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to
a specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network.
The server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.4.10 "Info command"
- ISON
ISON <nickname> [<nickname> [...]]
.
Query online status of a list of nicknames. The server replies with
a list only containing nicknames actually connected to a server in
the network. If no nicknames of the given list are online, an empty
list is returned to the client requesting the information.
Please note that "all" IRC daemons even parse separate nicknames in
a single parameter (like ":nick1 nick2"), and therefore ngIRCd
implements this behavior, too.
References:
- RFC 2812, 4.9 "Ison message"
- LINKS
LINKS [[<target>] [<mask>]
.
List all servers currently registered in the network matching <mask>,
or all servers if <mask> has been omitted, as seen by the server
specified by <target> or the local server when <target> is omitted.
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to
a specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.4.5 "Links message"
- LUSERS
LUSERS [<mask> [<target>]]
.
Return statistics about the number of clients (users, servers,
services, ...) in the network as seen by the server <target>.
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to
a specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network.
The server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
Please note that ngIRCd ignores the <mask> parameter entirely: it
is not possible to get information for a part of the network only.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.4.2 "Lusers message"
- MOTD
MOTD [<target>]
.
Show the "Message of the Day" (MOTD) of an IRC server in the network.
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to
a specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network.
The server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.4.1 "Motd message"
- NAMES
NAMES [<channel>[,<channel>[,...]] [<target>]]
.
Show the list of users that are members of a particular <channel>
(and that are visible for the client requesting this information) as
seen by the server <target>. More than one <channel> can be given
separated by "," (but not whitespaces!).
.
If <channel> has been omitted, all visible users are shown, grouped
by channel name, and all visible users not being members of at least
one channel are shown as members of the pseudo channel "*".
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to
a specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network.
The server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.2.5 "Names message"
- STATS
STATS [<query> [<target>]]
.
Show statistics and other information of type <query> of a particular
IRC server in the network.
.
The following <query> types are supported (case-insensitive where
applicable):
.
- g Network-wide bans ("G-Lines").
- k Server-local bans ("K-Lines").
- L Link status (servers and user links).
- l Link status (servers and own link).
- m Command usage count.
- u Server uptime.
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to
a specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network.
The server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
.
To use "STATS L" the user must be an IRC Operator.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.4.4 "Stats message"
- TIME
TIME [<target>]
.
Show the local time of an IRC server in the network.
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to
a specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network.
The server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
References
- RFC 2812, 3.4.6 "Time message"
- TRACE
TRACE [<target>]
.
Find the route to a specific server and send information about its
peers. Each server that processes this command reports back to the
sender about it: the replies from pass-through servers form a chain
which shows the route to the destination.
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to
a specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network.
The server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.4.8 "Trace message"
- USERHOST
USERHOST <nickname> [<nickname> [...]]
.
Show flags and the hostmasks (<user>@<host>) of the <nickname>s,
separated by spaces. The following flags are used:
.
- "-" The client is "away" (the mode "+a" is set on this client).
- "+" Client seems to be available, at least it isn't marked "away".
- "*" The client is an IRC operator (the mode "+o" is set).
References:
- RFC 2812, 4.8 "Userhost message"
- VERSION
VERSION [<target>]
.
Show version information about a particular IRC server in the network.
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to
a specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network.
The server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
.
Please note: in normal operation, the version number ends in a dot
(".", for example "ngIRCd-20.1."). If it ends in ".1" (for example
"ngIRCd-20.1.1", same version than before!), the server is running in
debug-mode; and if it ends in ".2", the "network sniffer" is active!
Keep your privacy in mind ...
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.4.3 "Version message"
- WHO
WHO [<mask> ["o"]]
.
Show a list of users who match the <mask>, or all visible users when
the <mask> has been omitted. (Special case: the <mask> "0" is
equivalent to "*")
.
If the flag "o" is given, the server will only return information about
IRC Operators.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.6.1 "Who query"
- WHOIS
WHOIS [<target>] <mask>[,<mask>[,...]]
.
Query information about users matching the <mask> parameter(s) as seen
by the server <target>; up to 3 <masks> are supported.
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to a
specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network. The
server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.6.2 "Whois query"
- WHOWAS
WHOWAS <nickname>[,<nickname>[,...]] [<count> [<target>]]
.
Query information about nicknames no longer in use in the network,
either because of nickname changes or disconnects. The history is
searched backwards, returning the most recent entry first. If there
are multiple entries, up to <count> entries will be shown (or all of
them, if no <count> has been given).
.
<target> can be a server name, the nickname of a client connected to a
specific server, or a mask matching a server name in the network. The
server of the current connection is used when <target> is omitted.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.6.3 "Whowas"
Channel Commands
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
- INVITE
INVITE <nickname> <channel>
.
Invite <nickname> to join channel <channel>.
.
<channel> does not have to exist, but if it does, only members of the
channel are allowed to invite other users. If the channel mode "+i"
is set, only channel "half-ops" (and above) may invite other clients,
and if channel mode "+V" is set, nobody can invite other users.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.2.7 "Invite message"
- JOIN
JOIN {<channel>[,<channel>[,...]] [<key>[,<key>[,...]]] | 0}
.
Makes the client join the <channel> (comma-separated list), specifying
the channel keys ("passwords"). A <channel-key> is only needed if the
<channel> has the mode "+k" set.
.
If the channel(s) do not exist, then they will be created.
.
Using "JOIN 0" parts all channels at once.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.2.1 "Join message" (client protocol)
- RFC 2813, 4.2.1 "Join message" (server protocol)
- KICK
KICK <channel>[,<channel>[,...]] <nickname>[,<nickname>[,...]] [<reason>]
.
Remove users(s) with <nickname>(s) from <channel>(s).
.
There must be either exactly one <channel> parameter and multiple
<nickname> parameters, or as many <channel> parameters as there are
<nickname> parameters. The <reason> is shown to the users being
kicked, and the nickname of the current user is used when <reason>
is omitted.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.2.8 "Kick command"
- LIST
LIST [<channel>[,<channel>[,...]] [<server>]]
.
List all visible <channels> (comma-separated list).
.
If <server> is given, the command will be forwarded to <server> for
evaluation.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.2.6 "List message"
- PART
PART <channel>[,<channel>[,...]] [<part-message>]
.
Leave <channel> (comma-separated list), optionally with sending a
<part-message> to all the other channel members.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.2.2 "Part message"
- TOPIC
TOPIC <channel> [<topic>]
.
Change or view the topic of a channel.
.
The topic for channel <channel> is returned if there is no <topic>
given. If the <topic> parameter is present, the topic for that
channel will be changed, if this action is allowed for the user
requesting it. If the <topic> parameter is an empty string, the
topic for that channel will be removed.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.2.4 "Topic message"
Administrative Commands
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
- CONNECT
CONNECT <server> [<port> [<remote-server> [<my-pwd> <peer-pwd>]]]
.
Instructs the current server, or <remote-server> if specified,
to connect to the server named <server>, which must be configured
in the server configuration file.
.
To use this command, the user must be an IRC Operator. To establish
a connection on a <remote-server>, you must have remote IRC operator
privileges.
.
If <port>, <my-pwd> and <peer-pwd> are given, these values override
the ones specified in the server configuration file.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.4.7 "Connect message"
- DIE
DIE [<message>]
.
Instructs the server to shut down.
.
The optional (and non-standard) <message> text is sent to each client
connected to this server before all connections are closed.
.
To use this command, the user must be an IRC Operator.
References:
- RFC 2812, 4.3 "Die message"
- DISCONNECT
DISCONNECT <server>
.
Disconnect and disable a locally linked server.
.
To use this command, the user must be an IRC Operator.
References:
- This command is not specified in the IRC RFCs, it is an extension
of ngIRCd.
- GLINE
GLINE <nick!user@hostmask> [<timeout> :<reason>]
.
This command provides timed G-Lines (network-wide bans).
.
If a client matches a G-Line, it cannot connect to any server on
the IRC network for <timeout> seconds. When <timeout> is 0, it make
the G-Line permanent.
.
If no <timeout> and no <reason> is given, the G-Line is removed.
.
To use this command, the user must be an IRC Operator.
.
"STATS g" can be used to list all currently active G-Lines.
References:
- This command is not specified in the IRC RFCs, it is an extension
of ngIRCd.
- KILL
KILL <nickname> <reason>
.
Forcibly remove all users with a given <nickname> from the IRC
network and display the given <reason> to them.
.
This command is used internally between servers, too, for example
to disconnect duplicate <nickname>'s after a "net split".
.
To use this command, the user must be an IRC Operator.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.7.1 "Kill message"
- KLINE
KLINE <nick!user@hostmask> [<timeout> :<reason>]
.
This command provides timed K-Lines (server-local bans).
.
If a client matches a K-Line, it cannot connect to this server for
<timeout> seconds. When <timeout> is 0, it makes the K-Line permanent.
.
If no <timeout> and no <reason> is given, the K-Line is removed.
.
To use this command, the user must be an IRC Operator.
.
"STATS k" can be used to list all currently active K-Lines.
References:
- This command is not specified in the IRC RFCs, it is an extension
of ngIRCd.
- OPER
OPER <name> <password>
.
Authenticates a user named <name> as an IRC operator on the current
server/network.
.
This operator <name> must be configured in the server configuration.
.
Please note that <name> is NOT related to a nickname at all!
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.1.4 "Oper message"
- REHASH
REHASH
.
Causes the server to re-read and re-process its configuration file(s).
.
While rehashing, no new connections are accepted, but all already
established connections stay connected.
.
To use this command, the user must be an IRC Operator.
References:
- RFC 2812, 4.2 "Rehash message"
- RESTART
RESTART
.
Restart the server.
.
While restarting, all connections are reset and no new connections
are accepted.
.
To use this command, the user must be an IRC Operator.
References:
- RFC 2812, 4.4 "Restart message"
- WALLOPS
WALLOPS <message>
.
Sends <message> to all users with user mode "+w".
.
To use this command, the user must be an IRC Operator.
References:
- RFC 2812, 4.7 "Operwall message"
IRC Service Commands
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
- SERVICE
SERVICE <name> <reserved1> <distribution> <type> <reserved2> <info>
SERVICE <name> <servertoken> <distribution> {<type>|+<modes>} <hops> <info>
.
Register a new service in the network.
.
The first form is used by directly linked services and isn't supported
by ngIRCd at the moment. The second form announces services connected
to remote "pseudo-servers" ("services hubs").
.
The <distribution> and <type> parameters are ignored by ngIRCd.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.1.6 "Service message"
- RFC 2813, 4.1.4 "Service message"
- SERVLIST
SERVLIST [<mask> [<type>]]
.
List all IRC services currently registered in the network.
.
The optional <mask> and <type> parameters can be used to limit the
listing to services matching the <mask> and that are of type <type>.
.
Please note that ngIRCd doesn't use any service types at the moment
and therefore all services are of type "0".
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.5.1 "Servlist message"
- SQUERY
SQUERY <target>[,<target>[,...]] <message>
.
Send a <message> to a given <target> IRC service, and report all
errors.
.
The "SQUERY" command exactly behaves like the "PRIVMSG" command, but
enforces that the <target> of the <message> is an IRC service.
Please see the help text of the "PRIVMSG" command for a detailed
description of the parameters!
.
If a user wants to interact with IRC services, he should use "SQUERY"
instead of "PRIVMSG" or "NOTICE": only "SQUERY makes sure that no
regular user, which uses the nickname of an IRC service, receives
the command in error, for example during a "net split"!
References:
- RFC 2812, 2.3.1 "Message format in Augmented BNF"
- RFC 2812, 3.3 "Sending messages"
- RFC 2812, 3.3.2 "Notice"
- SVSNICK
SVSNICK <oldnick> <newnick>
.
Forcefully change foreign user nicknames. This command is allowed
for servers only.
.
The "SVSNICK" command is forwarded to the server to which the user
with nickname <oldnick> is connected to, which in turn generates a
regular "NICK" command that then is sent to the client, so no special
support in the client software is required.
References:
- ngIRCd GIT commit e3f300d3231f
Server Protocol Commands
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
- CHANINFO
CHANINFO <channel> +<modes> [[<key> <limit>] <topic>]
.
CHANINFO is used by servers to inform each other about a channel:
its modes, channel key, user limits and its topic.
.
The CHANINFO command is allowed on server-links only.
References:
- IRC+, <http://ngircd.barton.de/doc/Protocol.txt>
- IRC+, doc/Protocol.txt
- ERROR
ERROR [<message> [<> [...]]]
.
Inform a client or a server about an error condition. The first
parameter, if given, is logged by the server receiving the message,
all other parameters are silently ignored.
.
This command is silently ignored on non-server and non-service links
and shouldn't be used by regular IRC clients.
.
The ERROR message is also sent before terminating a regular client
connection.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.7.4 "Error message"
- METADATA
METADATA <target> <key> <value>
.
The METADATA command is used on server-links to update "metadata"
information of clients, like the hostname, the info text ("real name"),
or the user name.
.
The METADATA command is allowed on server-links only.
References:
- IRC+, <http://ngircd.barton.de/doc/Protocol.txt>
- IRC+, doc/Protocol.txt
- NJOIN
NJOIN <channel> [<mode>]<nick>[,[<mode>]<nick>[,...]]
.
The NJOIN command is used on server-links to add users with <nick>
and <mode> to a <channel> while peering.
.
The NJOIN command is allowed on server-links only.
References:
- RFC 2813, 4.2.2 "Njoin message"
- SERVER
SERVER <servername> <info>
SERVER <servername> <hopcount> <info>
SERVER <servername> <hopcount> <token> <info>
.
The first form registers the local connection as a new server in the
network, the second (RFC 1459) and third (RFC 2812) form announce a
new remote server in the network.
.
The SERVER command is allowed on unregistered or server-links only.
References:
- RFC 1459, 4.1.4 "Server message"
- RFC 2813, 4.1.2 "Server message"
- SQUIT
SQUIT <server> <comment>
.
Disconnects an IRC Server from the network.
.
This command is used on server-links, but can be used by IRC Operators
to forcefully disconnect servers from the network, too.
References:
- RFC 2812, 3.1.8 "Squit"
- RFC 2813, 4.1.6 "Server quit message"
Dummy Commands
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
- SUMMON
SUMMON <user> [<target> [<channel>]]
.
This command was intended to call people into IRC who are directly
connected to the terminal console of the IRC server -- but is
deprecated today. Therefore ngIRCd doesn't really implement this
command and always returns an error message, regardless of the
parameters given.
References:
- RFC 2812, 4.5 "Summon message"
- USERS
USERS [<target>]
.
This command was intended to list users directly logged in into the
console of the IRC server -- but is deprecated today. Therefore ngIRCd
doesn't really implement this command and always returns an error
message, regardless of the parameters given.
References:
- RFC 2812, 4.6 "Users"
- GET
GET [...]
.
Fake HTTP GET command. When received, the connection is shut down
immediately again to protect against crazy web browsers ...
References:
- ngIRCd GIT commit 33e8c2480649
- POST
POST [...]
.
Fake HTTP POST command. When received, the connection is shut down
immediately again to protect against crazy web browsers ...
References:
- ngIRCd GIT commit 33e8c2480649