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Ninject allows you to inject multiple objects bound to a particular type or interface. For example, if we have our IWeapon interface, and two implementations, Sword and Dagger:

public interface IWeapon
{
    string Hit(string target);
}

public class Sword : IWeapon 
{
    public string Hit(string target) 
    {
        return "Slice " + target + " in half";
    }
}

public class Dagger : IWeapon 
{
    public string Hit(string target) 
    {
        return "Stab " + target + " to death";
    }
}

Here we have the Samurai class. You can see that its constructor takes an array of IWeapon. This means an array of the relevant concrete Service Types are generated by Ninject and handed to the Samurai on construction.

public class Samurai 
{
    readonly IWeapon[] allWeapons;

    public Samurai(IWeapon[] allWeapons) 
    {
        this.allWeapons = allWeapons;
    }

    public void Attack(string target) 
    {
        foreach (IWeapon weapon in this.allWeapons)
            Console.WriteLine(weapon.Hit(target));
    }
}

We can create bindings from the IWeapon interface to the Sword and Dagger types.

class TestModule : Ninject.Modules.NinjectModule
{
    public override void Load()
    {
        Bind<IWeapon>().To<Sword>();
        Bind<IWeapon>().To<Dagger>();
    }
}

Finally, a kernel is created with the module we defined above. We ask Ninject for an instance of a Samurai. Now, when you ask the Samurai to attack, you will see it has been given an array of all the types bound to IWeapon.

class Program
{
    public static void Main() 
    {
        Ninject.IKernel kernel = new StandardKernel(new TestModule());
        
        var samurai = kernel.Get<Samurai>();
        samurai.Attack("your enemy");
    }
}

And you’ll see:

Stab your enemy to death
Slice your enemy in half

The kernel also exposes a GetAll method which lets you generate the same output by doing:

class Program
{
    public static void Main() 
    {
        Ninject.IKernel kernel = new StandardKernel(new TestModule());
        
        IEnumerable<IWeapon> weapons = kernel.GetAll<IWeapon>();
        foreach(var weapon in weapons)
            Console.WriteLine(weapon.Hit("the evildoers"));
    }
}

Note that if you remove the foreach above, the objects will never get constructed – the individual results from GetAll() are generated as you iterate over it. (The same applies to using Constructor Injection to get an IEnumerable<T> – each enumeration will synthesize a sequence of objects on demand (i.e., not prior to the call of the constructor).)

Continue reading: Object Scopes

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