This repository has been archived by the owner. It is now read-only.
Permalink
Browse files

blog: Minor tweaks to style and some data conversion cleanup

  • Loading branch information...
isaacs committed Jun 22, 2012
1 parent 38250f9 commit ff2a1b86c31d481917b942ff62492365b7801cd1
Showing with 8 additions and 3 deletions.
  1. +3 −0 doc/blog.html
  2. +4 −2 doc/blog/npm/managing-node-js-dependencies-with-shrinkwrap.md
  3. +1 −1 tools/blog/generate.js
View
@@ -9,6 +9,9 @@
#column1 h1 {
clear:both;
}
+ #colum1 {
+ font-size: 14px;
+ }
#column1 li, #content h1 + p {
color:inherit;
font-family: inherit;
@@ -5,8 +5,10 @@ status: publish
category: npm
slug: managing-node-js-dependencies-with-shrinkwrap
-<p><div style="float:right;text-align:center;margin:5px;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/luc_viatour/4247957432/"><img class="size-medium wp-image-652" style="border:1px #000000 solid;" title="Web" src="http://dtrace.org/blogs/dap/files/2012/02/web-300x300.jpg" alt="" width="250" height="250" /></a>
-Photo by Luc Viatour (flickr)</div>Managing dependencies is a fundamental problem in building complex software. The terrific success of github and <a href="http://npmjs.org/">npm</a> have made code reuse especially easy in the Node world, where packages don&#039;t exist in isolation but rather as nodes in a large graph. The software is constantly changing (releasing new versions), and each package has its own constraints about what other packages it requires to run (dependencies). npm keeps track of these constraints, and authors express what kind of changes are compatible using <a href="http://npmjs.org/doc/semver.html">semantic versioning</a>, allowing authors to specify that their package will work with even future versions of its dependencies as long as the semantic versions are assigned properly.
+<p style="float:right;text-align:center;margin:5px;"><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/luc_viatour/4247957432/"><img class="size-medium wp-image-652" style="border:1px #000000 solid;" title="Web" src="http://dtrace.org/blogs/dap/files/2012/02/web-300x300.jpg" alt="" width="250" height="250" /></a><br>
+Photo by Luc Viatour (flickr)</p>
+
+<p>Managing dependencies is a fundamental problem in building complex software. The terrific success of github and <a href="http://npmjs.org/">npm</a> have made code reuse especially easy in the Node world, where packages don&#039;t exist in isolation but rather as nodes in a large graph. The software is constantly changing (releasing new versions), and each package has its own constraints about what other packages it requires to run (dependencies). npm keeps track of these constraints, and authors express what kind of changes are compatible using <a href="http://npmjs.org/doc/semver.html">semantic versioning</a>, allowing authors to specify that their package will work with even future versions of its dependencies as long as the semantic versions are assigned properly.
</p>
<p>This does mean that when you &quot;npm install&quot; a package with dependencies, there&#039;s no guarantee that you&#039;ll get the same set of code now that you would have gotten an hour ago, or that you would get if you were to run it again an hour later. You may get a bunch of bug fixes now that weren&#039;t available an hour ago. This is great during development, where you want to keep up with changes upstream. It&#039;s not necessarily what you want for deployment, though, where you want to validate whatever bits you&#039;re actually shipping.
View
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ var output = path.resolve(process.argv[3]);
var template = path.resolve(process.argv[4]);
var config = {
- postsPerPage: 5
+ postsPerPage: 4
};
console.error("argv=%j", process.argv)

0 comments on commit ff2a1b8

Please sign in to comment.