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digitalWrite HIGH & LOW inverted #16

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MutaborLingua opened this Issue May 9, 2016 · 11 comments

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@MutaborLingua

MutaborLingua commented May 9, 2016

Hello!

Let me get this straight. I bought the following board:
http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Free-shipping-NodeMCU-development-board-for-ESP-12E-from-ESP8266-esp-12E-Lua-IoT-programable-wifi/32583355412.html

I use the Arduino IDE, and everything works pretty much fine. I only have one problem:
If i test it for the blink sketch it reads HIGH as LOW and LOW as HIGH.

Example:
[code]
void setup() {
// initialize digital pin 16 as an output.
pinMode(16, OUTPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {
digitalWrite(16, HIGH); // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
delay(1000); // wait for a second
digitalWrite(16, LOW); // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
delay(100); // wait for 1/10 second
}
[/code]

This should do (as far as i know) that the LED is on for 1 second and then have a short pause of 1/10 second.
But what the board is really making is the opposite. The LED is off for 1 second following a short blink 1/10 second and so on...
Am I insane or is this plain inverted?

I'm on a mac with Arduino IDE 1.6.8
I use the following bridge drivers:
https://www.silabs.com/products/mcu/Pages/USBtoUARTBridgeVCPDrivers.aspx

Thank you for answers!

@rickyitexpert

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rickyitexpert commented Jun 19, 2016

Same here

@pamribeirox

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pamribeirox commented Jun 19, 2016

Some of those boards have the LED connected to VCC, probably because the MCU can sink more (the needed) current in the I/O pins at lower level.
This way, the LED only lights in the LOW state of the pin when it outputs about 0V

@tabvn

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tabvn commented Jul 2, 2016

I got the same issue , set LOW led is on.

and digitalWrite(relayPin, HIGH); // Led OFF i tested both on D0// 16 , and D7 // 13

very confusing about this ?

@pathob

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pathob commented Sep 4, 2016

This is the wanted behaviour. If the LED would need a current of 20 mA for full brightness and you would connect the anode of the LED to the GPIO, the GPIO couldn't provide the needed 20 mA, as it can only provide 12 mA.

If you turn it vice versa and connect the cathode to the GPIO and the anode to the main 3.3 volts power supply (which should be able to provide about 800 mA of current), you can reach the full brightness (and save your GPIO). But then, the LED lights up, when the GPIO is set low.

@tabvn

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tabvn commented Sep 5, 2016

Thanks for your information that helped. @pathob

@speeddragon

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speeddragon commented Jan 24, 2017

Just to be clear, is normal for every Digital PIN do be inverted or just the pin LEDs ?

@Trafitto

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Trafitto commented Jul 17, 2017

Same problem with digitalWrite(ledPin, 0); //Turn led ON

@mharmon12

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mharmon12 commented Aug 14, 2017

Very common practice to do this.
An I/O typically sinks more current than it can source.

Find a schematic for the LED on the circuit board you are using and you'll see how it's biased for the I/O.
Writing a "1" to that port doesn't mean turn the LED on, it means write a "1" to that port.

If this is difficult for you to remember then there are ways around the confusion.
I use sharp defines in my code to create pseudonyms to add clarity.

Someone once said that good code reads like a story.

Coding in C is not an elegant story...
The following code looks more like telling your pet to do a trick.
I address my pet (he knows I'm talking to him) then the trick I want the pet to do.

// My pet's name
#define Red_LED 16

// My pets mode
pinMode(Red_LED, OUTPUT);

// Your pet's tricks
#define turn_On 0
#define turn_Off 1

digitalWrite(Red_LED, turn_On);
digitalWrite(Red_LED, turn_Off);

You could get really crazy and write a function...

void RED_LED( string action ){
if( action == "ON" )
digitalWrite(Red_LED, turn_On);
}else{
digitalWrite(Red_LED, turn_Off);
}

RED_LED("ON");
RED_LED("OFF");

I would dig into the pins_arduino.h file and see if there is a definition for the LED on that GPIO and use that reference. It's a good practice to do that because it makes your code more portable.

@NarinLab

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NarinLab commented Sep 15, 2017

How can i make my external led that also connected to GPIO16 turn on and turn off in sync with my internal red led?

My brain can not process this logic. When i set my external led off, my internal led is on... and they both can not do what i say. pinMode(16, OUTPUT) and digitalWrite(16, LOW) also not working, i mean, may be i can turn the external led on just like the internal one by connecting the external led anode to 3.3v rail and cathode to pin 16 with that piece of code, but... its just not working.

Please help me.

@NarinLab

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NarinLab commented Sep 15, 2017

I'm sorry, problem solved. My imperfect sensor in my face didnot see the NodeMCU pin is not really click to breadboard. This silly things make me crazy for six hours.

The code is right, just need to push the Node to breadboard. hahh....

@mharmon12

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mharmon12 commented Sep 15, 2017

Best fix ever!
You have learned more than you know from this exercise.
Thank you for updating.

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