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<title>Welcome to NodeSchool Ciny</title>
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# NodeSchool Cincy
## thanks for coding with us!
---
## What is NodeSchool?
.center[![nodeSchool](images/nodeschool.png)]
## Check out the [workshoppers](http://nodeschool.io/#workshopper-list)
---
## Everyone is welcome...*except jerks*.
.center[![jerk-panda](images/jerk-panda.gif)]
---
## We have a Code of Conduct that we adhere to.
### Check it out in our Resources repo [https://github.com/nodeschool/cincinnati/blob/master/code_of_conduct.md](https://github.com/nodeschool/cincinnati/blob/master/code_of_conduct.md)
.center[![coc](images/coc.png)]
---
### how to not be a jerk...
# No feigning surprise
The first rule means you shouldn't act surprised when people say they don't
know something. This applies to both technical things ("What?! I can't believe
you don't know what the stack is!") and non-technical things ("You don't know
who RMS is?!").
Feigning surprise has absolutely no social or educational
benefit: When people feign surprise, it's usually to make them feel better
about themselves and others feel worse. And even when that's not the intention,
it's almost always the effect.
As you've probably already guessed, this rule is
tightly coupled to our belief in the importance of people feeling comfortable
saying "I don't know" and "I don't understand."
.tiny-text[via Recurse Center's User Guide https://www.recurse.com/manual#sub-sec-social-rules]
---
### how to not be a jerk...
# No well-actually's
A well-actually happens when someone says something that's almost - but not
entirely - correct, and you say, "well, actually…" and then give a minor
correction.
This is especially annoying when the correction has no bearing on
the actual conversation.
This doesn't mean we're not about truth-seeking or that we don't care about
being precise. Almost all well-actually's in our experience are about
grandstanding, not truth-seeking.
(Thanks to Miguel de Icaza for originally coining the term "well-actually.")
.tiny-text[via Recurse Center's User Guide https://www.recurse.com/manual#sub-sec-social-rules]
---
### how to not be a jerk...
# No back-seat driving
If you overhear people working through a problem, you shouldn't intermittently
lob advice across the room.
This can lead to the "too many cooks" problem, but more important, it can be
rude and disruptive to half-participate in a conversation.
This isn't to say you shouldn't help, offer advice, or join conversations. On
the contrary, we encourage all those things. Rather, it just means that when
you want to help out or work with others, you should fully engage and not just
butt in sporadically.
.tiny-text[via Recurse Center's User Guide https://www.recurse.com/manual#sub-sec-social-rules]
---
### how to not be a jerk...
# Let the learner drive
At times it may be faster when you're helping someone to jump on their keyboard
and just get the task done, but that's no way to learn.
Although at times this
takes a great deal of patience for both parties, in the end, one of the best
ways to learn is by doing. So, unless someone offers their keys up, let them do
the driving.
---
### how to not be a jerk...
# No subtle -isms
Our last social rule bans subtle racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, and
other kinds of bias. This one is different from the rest, because it covers a
class of behaviors instead of one very specific pattern.
Subtle -isms are small things that make others feel uncomfortable, things that
we all sometimes do by mistake.
For example, saying "It's so easy my grandmother could do it" is a subtle -ism.
Like the other four social rules, this one is often accidentally broken. Like
the other three, it's not a big deal to mess up – you just apologize and move
on.
.tiny-text[via Recurse Center's User Guide https://www.recurse.com/manual#sub-sec-social-rules]
---
## We follow these guidelines to have the best coding environment for you *because*...
.center[![kind-smart-important](images/ksi.gif)]
---
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# Join us!
## Slack & Repo & Lead Workshops
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