Want to run an event? #93

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mikeal opened this Issue Dec 1, 2013 · 114 comments

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@mikeal
Member
mikeal commented Dec 1, 2013

Can we use this thread to collect "what you need to know to run a NodeSchool" so that we can link to this on the main website and encourage more people to run local events.

Listening to this podcast is probably a good idea :)

http://www.nodeup.com/fiftyfive

Also read these summary posts from previous events:

http://blog.hood.ie/2013/11/nodeschool-london/
nodeschool/nodeschool.github.io#15

@substack
substack commented Dec 1, 2013

There is now a link at the bottom of http://nodeschool.io pointing to this issue thread. Additionally, if you have a venue booked to run a nodeschool event, state the date and location in this thread to get your event listed on the website and also link to a tweet so you can be retweeted by the nodeschool twitter account.

@rvagg
rvagg commented Dec 2, 2013

Also, we need stickers that can be given out at any of the events, @maxogden & @jlord you guys seem to be king & queen of nerd stickers, can you make this happen?

Perhaps anyone running an event can request to have a batch sent to them, or get the design to be printed locally or whatever. I imagine something about completing NodeSchool: "I attended NodeSchool and survived" or whatever.

@mattcreager

Hey folks, I'm in Halifax, NS and have been pulling together a local JS meetup, I'm considering about making this a regular part of the meetup, perhaps an hour of node school followed by an hour of lightning talks, has anyone got experience with this mix?

@mikeal
Member
mikeal commented Dec 3, 2013

@mattcreager that sounds like what BrooklynJS is planning to soon (layering in NodeSchool before the talks of their regular event). /cc @brianloveswords

@mattcreager

Thanks @mikeal! @brianloveswords will you let me know how it goes?

@donnfelker

FYI - I'm thinking about doing one in Phoenix soon.

@JaimeLynSchatz

Anyone up for an event in the Redmond/Seattle/Eastside area?

@JaimeLynSchatz

I know something folks who want to run an event need to do: 1. Read the thread topic ( ;) mea culpa) and 2. Know where to post things like my misplaced comment above.

@richorama

I plan to help run one in Norwich, UK on 10th March.

http://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/158375062/

If there are some stickers or resources available, that would be great.

@iancrowther
Member

Im up for doing another event in London at Shoreditch Village Hall.
@maxogden any chance you can get in touch on twitter(@iancrowther) with some of the costs/gotchas/who to call?

@sclarson

FYI, we're going to be doing these as a workshop series for the dev meetup in Sioux Falls, SD. We have a mix of designers and developers that are registered.

@maxogden
Contributor

@iancrowther I believe @andrew expressed interest recently in helping run a https://github.com/jlord/git-it workshop (a workshopper by @jlord) in london

I tried to write up the gotchas here: nodeschool/nodeschool.github.io#15

@hackygolucky
Member

Thanks @maxogden!! We've got our first workshop set for the end of February in PDX and you guys documenting all of the adventures will certainly help us avoid the pitfalls.

@iancrowther iancrowther referenced this issue in nodeschool/london Jan 28, 2014
Closed

March Planning #1

6 of 16 tasks complete
@iancrowther
Member

@maxogden So Im doing an event in London on March 12th at Shoreditch Work Village Hall

Can you add me to the ti.to so i can get some tickets in the wild.

example: https://ti.to/nodeschool/london-march-2014

@brianloveswords

Just got confirmation from the space today: I'm gonna be running an event in Brooklyn on Sunday, Feb 23rd at Huge – https://ti.to/nodeschool-nyc/brooklyn-february-2014

@mikeal
Member
mikeal commented Jan 31, 2014

w00t w00t!

@mikeal
Member
mikeal commented Jan 31, 2014

And both of you should add it to node-meatspace :)

https://github.com/knode/node-meatspace

SLACKERS!

@hackygolucky
Member

:D Indeed! I also need to get our ti.to page up because we've got a
nodeschool workshop running Feb. 21 in PDX!!!

Thanks @mikeal

On Fri, Jan 31, 2014 at 11:16 AM, Mikeal Rogers notifications@github.comwrote:

And both of you should add it to node-meatspace :)

https://github.com/knode/node-meatspace

SLACKERS!

Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/nodeschool/discussions/issues/93#issuecomment-33832884
.

@brianloveswords

haha @mikeal DONE.

@sclarson

We had 3 people go through learnyounode in advance to be familiar with the problems and having 26 attendees seemed to keep us busy with initial setup issues for 15-20 minutes. After that people seemed to pair up with those next to them for help and we had very few questions. Everything went very well. From some brief polling the average attendee made it through 2/3rds of learnyounode in 2 hours. Everyone we talked to wanted to do it again in the future to finish learnyounode and move on to some of the other lessons.

@maxogden
Contributor
maxogden commented Feb 1, 2014

@sclarson w00t!

@hackygolucky
Member

Feb. 20, https://ti.to/pdxnode/nodeschool Woohoo! Adding to nodeschool.io and node-meatspace now... \o/

@brianloveswords

:highfive:

@headwinds

Toronto Javascript Hackers present Node School
Tuesday, May 13th / 2014
6:30PM - 9PM

We have a few cool mentors who are all stoked to offer support:

@pnitsch - http://labs.teehanlax.com/
@MikkoH -  http://www.jam3.com/
@adamrhunter - http://splitelement.com/
@pchen - http://karma-laboratory.com

Full Event Info

@adamrhunter

You have the order mixed up. I don't work for Jam3. I work for SplitElement
;)
a.

On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 9:05 AM, brandon flowers notifications@github.comwrote:

Toronto Javascript Hackers present Node School
Tuesday, May 13th / 2014
6:30PM - 9PM

We have few a cool mentors who are all stoked to offer support:

@pnitsch https://github.com/pnitsch - http://labs.teehanlax.com/
@MikkoH https://github.com/MikkoH - http://splitelement.com/
@adamrhunter https://github.com/adamrhunter - http://www.jam3.com/

Full Event Info http://www.meetup.com/torontojshackers/events/164164592/

Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/nodeschool/discussions/issues/93#issuecomment-34061686
.

Adam Hunter
email: arhunter@gmail.com
web: http://www.splitelement.com
LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/adamrussellhunter
Skype: org.pushreset.adam

@headwinds

Yes you do... and do some awesome things there.. like building apps for Orangutans - if you can teach them, we should be easy

@iancrowther
Member

London nodeschool
March 12th
19:00 - 21:00
Shoreditch Works Village Hall.

https://ti.to/nodeschool/london-march-2014

http://lanyrd.com/2014/ldnnodeschool/

@oriolgual

At Barcelona FutureJS we have a call for workshops opened until February 28th, and we'd love someone proposing a Node school event.

@julianduque

NodeSchool Medellin
Date: Feb 22, 2014
Hour: 10am
Address: Calle 8 # 42 - 49
Medellin, Colombia

Hosted by MedellinJS!

@mikeal
Member
mikeal commented Feb 19, 2014

Everyone who has meetups, please send a PR to the nodeschool website and node-meatspace to help promote your event :)

@julianduque

done :)

@Sequoia
Contributor
Sequoia commented Feb 21, 2014

Linked here from nodeschool.io "run a nodeschool event." I'm seeking more information on formats that have worked etc..

Looks like what's needed is

  1. A space
  2. ~1:10 (or greater) "instructors" to learners
  3. ~2 hours

People who have put on this event: is this about right?

I'd like to propose an action item for this ticket: "create wikipage on github or page on nodeschool.io with a brief set of instructions/suggestions for holding a nodeschool event." (This thread has useful info but not organized.) I'm happy to do this once I've run an event- is there someone who's done this who's willing to write up a bullet list of stuff to have and/or planning tips? 👍 nodeschool

@jewkesy
jewkesy commented Feb 23, 2014

Anybody planning to run an event in central England? Really keen to attend

@brianloveswords

Debrief from Brooklyn NodeSchool

image
image

Stats

I neglected to get exact counts, but we had 7 mentors and about 35 students (1:5 ratio). We were scheduled to run from 2:00pm–5:30pm, but we ended up starting a little late (there was some confusion about the start time) and running a little late, so it was actually closer to 2:30pm–6:30pm. Huge graciously supplied bottles of water and fruit during the event, and at around 5:00pm they brought out beers.

What went well

  • In the beginning of the event, I had learners introduce themselves to their tablemates and encouraged them to ask each other for help as much as possible, and I saw a lot of this happening.
  • Our physical setup worked really well. As you can see from the pictures above, we had small tables of 5–6 people (and a few couches off to the side which are not pictured). Mentors were easily able to snake around the tables and get in there to help people, and the table setup encouraged people to help their neighbors.
  • Learning from some advice by @maxogden, I told mentors wander around the room and periodically ask the tables how people were doing, and if anyone needed any help. This helped people feel more comfortable to We also had enough mentors that some were able to camp out at specific tables to be available for questions.
  • About 80% of our learners were working on learnyounode, with a handful working on stream-adventure. This also helped, as the learners working on stream-adventure were encouraged to act as ad-hoc mentors when the other learners at their table got stuck.
  • I don't know how best to capture this, but the atmosphere was relaxed and low pressure. I think we did a good job of framing the event as space for hanging out and co-learning rather than anything super formal & top-down.
  • Huge, our sponsor for location and victuals, was impressed enough with the event that they have asked me to do more, possibly a monthly series.
  • Many of the students came up as they were leaving to thank me and the other mentors, saying how much they learned and how they are looking forward to the next one.
  • One of the learners brought his daughter and I got an awesome email from him afterwards saying how much they both enjoyed the event and how she decided she wants to be a programmer now!
  • We had a diverse group of both mentors and learners.

What could be improved

  • The front door to the building is locked on the weekend (it's a shared office building), which we didn't know. We propped it open, but it closed a few times and I had to go and re-open it. We also didn't have a sign on that exterior door saying something like “nodeschool is here, come to the 2nd floor or tweet at me if the door is locked and you need to get in!“ which might have helped.
  • Confusion about the start time – I sent out an email with the wrong time listed in the subject, and though I quickly sent out a correction email, not everyone read the second email, so we had a second wave show up about 30 minutes after the first wave. Thankfully, Huge let us run about an hour later than originally scheduled, so we didn't lose time overall.
  • We didn't have a projector, I think it would have been useful especially in the beginning.
  • I made the event free and Sunday turned out to be the nicest day of the year. Out of the 60 learners registered, ~25 did not show up (and 3 of our mentors bailed last minute, too). I'm ambivalent about this: we did end up with a great mentor–to–learner ratio anyway, and the number of people was just about perfect for the amount of space we had in the main area, but it was also bummer some people who wanted to come couldn't because we were sold out of tickets. I'm thinking about charging a token amount next time to increase commitment (and donating the proceeds).
  • Almost everyone got stuck on the Make It Modular section of learnyounode. I want to think about how to write a new example in the hints section, or maybe even an intermediary lesson.
  • That off-by-one error on the counting lines exercise frustrated a lot of people.
  • We should prepare a form, maybe a google survey, asking students “what did you like, what didn't you like, what could be improved,” etc!
  • I wish we had stickers!!

Conclusion

Everyone had an awesome time, and I'm looking forward to the next one! Thanks to my mentor team, @toolness, @sarajo, @johnkpaul, @jcrugzz, @reconbot, @furf and @ameensol! If you have anything you want to add, please feel free!

@hackygolucky
Member

This is awesome, @brianloveswords !!! Looking forward to getting PDXNode's
report out from last week as well.

On Tue, Feb 25, 2014 at 11:07 AM, Brian J Brennan
notifications@github.comwrote:

Debrief from Brooklyn NodeSchool

[image: image]https://github-camo.global.ssl.fastly.net/d983a546d901a6187fa462f7d8aea1c8dbc1cff8/687474703a2f2f64697374696c6c657279696d616765342e616b2e696e7374616772616d2e636f6d2f64306335356261653963643831316533386463343065326437646236626263305f382e6a7067
[image: image]https://github-camo.global.ssl.fastly.net/d875a54fffb2542159f6df0e0cf3a5e01cdc9717/687474703a2f2f64697374696c6c657279696d616765342e616b2e696e7374616772616d2e636f6d2f34373063613965303963633331316533393935363065666362366665393339385f382e6a7067
Stats

I neglected to get exact counts, but we had 7 mentors and about 35
students (1:5 ratio). We were scheduled to run from 2:00pm-5:30pm, but we
ended up starting a little late (there was some confusion about the start
time) and running a little late, so it was actually closer to
2:30pm-6:30pm. Huge graciously supplied bottles of water and fruit during
the event, and at around 5:00pm they brought out beers.
What went well

In the beginning of the event, I had learners introduce themselves to
their tablemates and encouraged them to ask each other for help as much as
possible, and I saw a lot of this happening.

Our physical setup worked really well. As you can see from the
pictures above, we had small tables of 5-6 people (and a few couches off to
the side which are not pictured). Mentors were easily able to snake around
the tables and get in there to help people, and the table setup encouraged
people to help their neighbors.
-

Learning from some advice by @maxogden https://github.com/maxogden,
I told mentors wander around the room and periodically ask the tables how
people were doing, and if anyone needed any help. This helped people feel
more comfortable to We also had enough mentors that some were able to camp
out at specific tables to be available for questions.
-

About 80% of our learners were working on learnyounode, with a handful
working on stream-adventure. This also helped, as the learners working
on stream-adventure were encouraged to act as ad-hoc mentors when the
other learners at their table got stuck.
-

I don't know how best to capture this, but the atmosphere was relaxed
and low pressure. I think we did a good job of framing the event as space
for hanging out and co-learning rather than anything super formal &
top-down.
-

Huge, our sponsor for location and victuals, was impressed enough with
the event that they have asked me to do more, possibly a monthly series.

Many of the students came up as they were leaving to thank me and the
other mentors, saying how much they learned and how they are looking
forward to the next one.

One of the learners brought his daughter and I got an awesome email
from him afterwards saying how much they both enjoyed the event and how she
decided she wants to be a programmer now!

We had a diverse group of both mentors and learners.

What could be improved

The front door to the building is locked on the weekend (it's a shared
office building), which we didn't know. We propped it open, but it closed a
few times and I had to go and re-open it. We also didn't have a sign on
that exterior door saying something like "nodeschool is here, come to the
2nd floor or tweet at me if the door is locked and you need to get in!"
which might have helped.
-

Confusion about the start time - I sent out an email with the wrong
time listed in the subject, and though I quickly sent out a correction
email, not everyone read the second email, so we had a second wave show up
about 30 minutes after the first wave. Thankfully, Huge let us run about an
hour later than originally scheduled, so we didn't lose time overall.
-

We didn't have a projector, I think it would have been useful
especially in the beginning.

I made the event free and Sunday turned out to be the nicest day of
the year. Out of the 60 learners registered, ~25 did not show up (and 3 of
our mentors bailed last minute, too). I'm ambivalent about this: we
did end up with a great mentor-to-learner ratio anyway, and the
number of people was just about perfect for the amount of space we had in
the main area, but it was also bummer some people who wanted to come
couldn't because we were sold out of tickets. I'm thinking about charging a
token amount next time to increase commitment (and donating the proceeds).
-

Almost everyone got stuck on the Make It Modular section of
learnyounode. I want to think about how to write a new example in the
hints section, or maybe even an intermediary lesson.

That off-by-one error on the counting lines exercise frustrated a lot
of people.

We should prepare a form, maybe a google survey, asking students "what
did you like, what didn't you like, what could be improved," etc!

I wish we had stickers!!

Conclusion

Everyone had an awesome time, and I'm looking forward to the next one!
Thanks to my mentor team, @toolness https://github.com/toolness, @sarajohttps://github.com/sarajo,
@johnkpaul https://github.com/johnkpaul, @jcrugzzhttps://github.com/jcrugzz,
@reconbot https://github.com/reconbot, @furf https://github.com/furfand
@ameensol https://github.com/ameensol! If you have anything you want to
add, please feel free!

Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/nodeschool/discussions/issues/93#issuecomment-36045066
.

@mikeal
Member
mikeal commented Feb 25, 2014

@brianloveswords thanks for this amazing write up!

In the beginning of the event, I had learners introduce themselves to their tablemates and encouraged them to ask each other for help as much as possible, and I saw a lot of this happening.

This is a really great practice. We might want to start collecting this stuff in a markdown file somewhere.

Almost everyone got stuck on the Make It Modular section of learnyounode. I want to think about how to write a new example in the hints section, or maybe even an intermediary lesson.

I've noticed this one also has a disproportionate amount of support requests as well. Maybe we should look in to refactoring this. @rvagg what do you think?

Out of the 60 learners registered, ~25 did not show up (and 3 of our mentors bailed last minute, too)

I would love to talk to tito about an "RSVP commitment" feature where we collect credit card information and only charge people if they don't attend.

@julianduque

First NodeSchool @ Medellin

The event was a success!, on our Meetup page we had 30 people registered but only 21 shown up the day of the event. We worked only on learnyounode, next event will be focusing streams-adventure. Only 1 mentor was involved in the event (me :p) but it was an awesome experience :)

Also I'm writing a new workshop, will share more info when gets ready :)

highres_336145142

@SaraJo
SaraJo commented Feb 26, 2014

Yay Medellin!
On Tuesday, February 25, 2014, Julian Duque notifications@github.com
wrote:

First NodeSchool @ Medellin

The event was a success!, on our Meetup pagehttp://www.meetup.com/MedellinJS/events/167090612/we had 30 people registered but only 21 shown up the day of the event. We
worked only on learnyounode, next event will be focusing streams-adventure.
Only 1 mentor was involved in the event (me :p) but it was an awesome
experience :)

Also I'm writing a new workshop, will share more info when gets ready :)

[image: highres_336145142]https://f.cloud.github.com/assets/733877/2266727/d84652aa-9ea1-11e3-87a4-13ccddf445e9.jpeg

Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/nodeschool/discussions/issues/93#issuecomment-36090956
.

Sara J Chipps
862.201.3065
CTO Flatiron School http://flatironschool.com

Blog
http://SaraJChipps.com http://sarajchipps.com/

Projects
http://GirlDevelopIt.com http://girldevelopit.com/
http://Levo.com http://levoleague.com/
http://ElizabethandClarke.com http://elizabethandclarke.com/


No trees were killed in sending this message but a large number of
electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

@buritica

Will be running the first one in Bogota in April when i'm down there for a few days. Looking for a venue right now, tentative dates are 11 or 12 of April. @brianloveswords how long was the event?

@brianloveswords

@Buritica official run time was 2pm–5:30pm, but some people showed up at 2:30pm and some people stuck around until ~6:30pm, so about 2.5–3 hours.

@hackygolucky
Member

Portland’s first nodeschool.io workshop

A great turnout, a few hiccups, lessons learned.
nodeschoolers
ON PLANNING
The charge was led by PDXNode. We were fortunate enough to have 10 mentors, many our own PDXNode organizers and others who were fantastic community members willing to step up for mentor roles. We built a plan of attack by doing a little homework.

A huge thanks to everyone who contributed to conversations in in this very room for insight on how we could avoid some of the pitfalls of prior workshops and were able to offer an awesome experience to our students. After reading this and recognizing what would suit our strengths, we decided on group sizes of 18 to maximize mentor-to-student ratio. The mentors were asked to familiarize themselves with the workshops being offered in order to be the most help on-site.

We chose to kick-off nodeschool in Portland by offering three workshops concurrently: Learn You The Node.js For Much Win!, async You, and Functional JavaScript. We ran out of space for Learn You Node in a few days’ time. Functional JavaScript(18) and async You had a smaller following at 12. We were super fortunate to have only 3 no-shows from our rsvp list. I wonder now if that was out of how small we kept the ticket offering in the first place.

The attendee breakdown seemed to filter very well for the workshops. All three workshops seemed to attract new-to-node and new programmers alike. We had a 1:6 gender ratio for turnout. I’d like this to be better, but we have to be more cognizant and deliberate in our outreach in order to make that happen.

Quickleft was amazing and immediately responsive in supplying our students with food and drinks to keep them energized through the evening. Urban Airship was kind enough to provide us with a common space and breakout rooms to allow for flexibility in the learning environment. Our sponsors helped provide a really solid first offering.

ON LEARNING
We kicked off the event at 6pm.

Welcome! Get comfy, grab some pizza, and take a seat. If you don’t already have it, hop on our wifi and get the registered workshop installed on your laptop while we get situated and make friends. If you don’t know how to make that happen, find one of our smiling mentors and we’ll get you set up. This soft install start allowed us to mitigate wifi trouble for a little while.

We’re all here to learn. We have a code of conduct. It’s mostly, ‘Don’t be a jerk.” My name is Tracy. Find me if you need to talk about anything. The other mentors are happy to help, too.

The mentors lined up, introduced themselves, and then we did the wave. Yup, the wave. It was mostly to shake things out and let the students know we’re a bunch of dorks and there’s absolutely no reason to fear asking questions from us. Keep it silly.

We’re going to be peer learning. When we break off into smaller groups, make sure and say hi to the few people sitting around you. They are probably new to this. They are happy to try and help. Be loud. Ask questions. Raise your hand. Most important, be kind. Even our mentors had hiccups trying these workshops. It isn’t easy!

We moved out to our breakouts and the students jumped right in.

From Wraithan, one our mentors:

Last week I got to participate in the first PDX Nodeschool event. I joined as a mentor and helped out in the Functional Javascript room. It was a lot of fun to teach students the value of using recursion and callbacks over traditional imperative programming. We had students that started as low as not even having node installed but all got at least 4-5 questions through it in about 1.5-2 hours. The session came to a natural close about 15 minutes before we were supposed to clear out. It was a great experience and I can't wait to mentor at another.

MISTAKES WERE MADE
The eternal struggle of wifi haunts us at our events. We’ll have to continue to prioritize finding ways to not need wifi as much as possible during events. We were forced to ask students to drop off the network so that others could access it when needed. For future events, we plan on adding a call for thumbdrives donated by a sponsor. We’d love to be able to offer small storage take home drives that just contain the evening’s workshops on them. I had the MDN archived from a wifi-less flight I had taken recently.

While the air was chill and students were helpful, it was still a pretty quiet evening. The students were pretty helpful to one another. The intermediate attendees naturally paired up with a neighbor and helped out, calling mentors over for more clarification rather than help with the problems themselves. I’ve considered a more interactive approach for the next workshop--the intention being to encourage everyone, especially newcomers, to speak code and work through a problem together. After there's time for everyone to work on an exercise, a few students at a time get up and walk through their solution--or the lackthereof.

We also didn’t do proper introductions to the format of the command line interface after the break-off into each individual workshop. The Functional JavaScript mentors outlined the first few steps on the whiteboard. We should have been consistent. Our assumption that everyone was already comfortable with it made this less accessible than intended.

We were a bit haphazard with sponsorships. We went back and forth on whether we should charge for registration to keep rsvps compliant. We planned this event pretty quickly, which didn’t allow for us to prepare our in-progress prospectus for financial help. Fortunately for us, amazing sponsors like QuickLeft stepped up immediately to make the event more comfortable.

ENOUGH OF THAT. IT WAS AWESOME.
We had a ton of excitement generated from nodeschool. Our students can’t wait for the next workshop night and were already reporting back on finishing what they’d started. Many jumped into other workshops on their own the weekend after. We had an even more successful Code & Learn/Nodebots night this week thanks to enthusiasm and confidence built from nodeschool.

One of our mentors, Dave Justice, wrote a tutorial after “students were digging around for Async docs and were continually being booted off of the WiFi.” We ended up getting a quick resource on how to help handle offline development for future events!

This wouldn’t have been possible without our sponsors. We’re lucky to have companies that see value in community. Everyone had an awesome time, and I'm looking forward to the next one! Thanks to the mentors who made this rock: @nvcexploder, @nrn, @justinabrahms, @jarofghosts, @wraithan, @chrisdickinson, @jondlm, @meandavejustice, and @dlmanning!

STAY TUNED! Next NODESCHOOL APRIL 24th

@xMartin xMartin referenced this issue Mar 2, 2014
Closed

OpenTechSchool #221

@elf-pavlik

@brianloveswords what do you think about issuing Open Badges for people who participated in workshops? 🏆

@maxogden
Contributor
maxogden commented Mar 2, 2014

@elf-pavlik it's been planned for a while but nobodys implemented it yet. see https://gist.github.com/toolness/6527882 for some technical details

@maxogden
Contributor
maxogden commented Mar 2, 2014

I just put together a new page on the nodeschool site:

http://nodeschool.io/host

It has a compilation of stuff from this thread and other places. Feel free to send PRs adding/removing content from there. it also lists all the awesome writeups that are in here.

@hackygolucky @brianloveswords @julianduque thank you so much for the writeups!

@hackygolucky
Member

Nice! Thanks @maxogden for whittling it down to a digestible minimum for
everyone seeking guidance. Y'all make running this a whole lot easier.
On Mar 2, 2014 1:47 PM, "Max Ogden" notifications@github.com wrote:

I just put together a new page on the nodeschool site:

http://nodeschool.io/host

It has a compilation of stuff from this thread and other places. Feel free
to send PRs adding/removing content from there. it also lists all the
awesome writeups that are in here.

@hackygolucky https://github.com/hackygolucky @brianloveswordshttps://github.com/brianloveswords
@julianduque https://github.com/julianduque thank you so much for the
writeups!

Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/nodeschool/discussions/issues/93#issuecomment-36468335
.

@elf-pavlik

@maxogden nice! I thought more in direction of issuing badges in semi-automated way by people who organize workshops and based on feedback from mentors... if people RSVP using Mozilla Persona it all could boil down to just few clicks to confirm issuing badges in the end of an event. Soon I may need to put together anyhow some self-hosted workshop organizing app with support for issuing Open Badges, maybe also playing there using RSVP explained in Integration of Hydra into Schema.org, if someone would like to team up on doing that I could try to give it higher priority! Maybe @xMartin & Open Tech School crew?

@olizilla
olizilla commented Mar 7, 2014

Sinfo nodeschool

http://xxi.sinfo.org/index.php/home/schedule/workshops/nodejs-workshop

  • 30 RSVP'd and 35 turned up!
  • 4 mentors (@olizilla @alanshaw @cwaring & last minute super bonus help from @diasdavid)
  • 1.5 hours long (5:30pm - 7pm)
  • Pair programming
  • Total epic win!
  • 97% did learnyounode
  • 3% did levelmeup
  • Highest score: http collect
  • Everyone got at least as far as filtered LS

As people arrived we introduced ourselves and got them all to install node and learnyounode. We'd asked everyone to install node before arriving but about 20% hadn't. Took about 15mins to get everyone in and ready to roll.

We forked the nodeschool site and served it from a laptop, complete with direct downloads to zips of the workshoppers, just in case of grand internet fail. Wireless isolation was sidestepped via the wonders of http://localtunnel.me/

We did a bit of an experiment and asked them all to pair program. We had a terminal on the projector and demonstrated how to install learnyounode, run it and then worked through the HELLO WORLD challenge, keeping the tone suitably silly and friendly (there may have been some dancing to the Rocky theme tune). We deliberately got it wrong the first time so we could show how to use the verify and run commands to help debug, and demonstrating how to pair program at the same time.

We didn't strictly enforce pairing, but it seemed to work really well as ruse to get people helping each other. The room was never silent, and as people were talking already, they seemed comfortable asking questions when they got stuck. For the most part, having 2 brains on a workshopper meant there were fewer people getting stuck. There were still a couple of lone wolves, who didn't want to pair, so we made sure to check in on them regularly as we buzzed around the room.

The issues we faced were really down to people not reading the workshoppers, the most common stumbling blocks were:

  • Passing arguments to solutions. About 50% thought they had to find a file and pass it as to their solution when running it. It'd be a good idea to explain how workshopper works at the beginning
  • Off by one on the newline counting. Event though the solution explains it...
  • The mismatch between path.extname returning the file extension with a ".", and the extension passed to Filtered LS not.

Far from problems, I think they are representative of issues a developer will face, so I don't think we need to make any changes to the workshoppers, it's just worth giving mentors the heads up on the common pitfalls.

We had a bunch of ubuntu install issues, but easily remedied by following the steps in: https://github.com/joyent/node/wiki/Installing-Node.js-via-package-manager#wiki-ubuntu-mint-elementary-os

Everyone left happy and looking forward to trying more workshoppers. Thanks for all the write ups, they really help, and, GO NODESCHOOL!

nodeschool-sinfo-xxi

@cwaring
cwaring commented Mar 7, 2014

SINFO appendix \o/

I've uploaded some pictorial evidence from our SINFO Nodeschool. The pair programming worked out brilliantly.

@richorama

Report from our Norwich nodeschool event, from a small corner of England.

We had 30 attendees, but only 2 mentors (we're not in Oakland you know - node.js experience is scarce!). This ratio worked, but for the mentors it was a non-stop 4 hours!

We ran the event from 12:30 to 4:30 pm, which included a 10 minute introduction at the start, and at 15 minute wrap up at the end.

We moved tables and chairs around to create small groups, and to encourage collaboration and discussion. This seemed to work, and people worked together in some cases.

Four or five people completed 'learnyounode'. Others were keen to finish the lessons at home.

I noticed that people with no (or little) JavaScript experience struggled with some of the lessons, particularly when async was introduced. I found myself explaining the concept of a callback several times. The idea of passing a function around was a lot for people to get their heads around, especially when the example shows an anonymous function declared in the argument. It made more sense to people when you create a function called callback, and pass a reference to that in.

I think a 'learnyoujavascript' would have been valuable for these people. Perhaps I should have pointed them to a JavaScript tutorial or book prior to the workshop.

The feedback was very positive on the quality of the tutorial package, people were impressed with how sophisticated the testing was on verify

We had a couple of technical issues with laptops, and I ended up lending my laptop to someone as we couldn't get learnyounode to work (I'll report the issue separately). I suggest organisers have a couple of spare machines just in case.

We had to ask for more power sockets. I would suggest organisers bring a few spare 4 way adaptors.

Everyone enjoyed the afternoon, everyone learnt something, and I think everyone said they'd like to attend a future nodeschool event!

photo

@hackygolucky
Member

I think there's been a number of people that would have -loved- to have a
learnyoujavascript. Maybe we should consider building a new workshop :D

Great feedback! And here, here! Two mentors with 30 students is an insane
and awesome effort @richorama

On Wed, Mar 12, 2014 at 3:50 AM, Richard Astbury
notifications@github.comwrote:

Report from our Norwich nodeschool event, from a small corner of England.

We had 30 attendees, but only 2 mentors (we're not in Oakland you know -
node.js experience is scarce!). This ratio worked, but for the mentors it
was a non-stop 4 hours!

We ran the event from 12:30 to 4:30 pm, which included a 10 minute
introduction at the start, and at 15 minute wrap up at the end.

We moved tables and chairs around to create small groups, and to encourage
collaboration and discussion. This seemed to work, and people worked
together in some cases.

Four or five people completed 'learnyounode'. Others were keen to finish
the lessons at home.

I noticed that people with no (or little) JavaScript experience struggled
with some of the lessons, particularly when async was introduced. I found
myself explaining the concept of a callback several times. The idea of
passing a function around was a lot for people to get their heads around,
especially when the example shows an anonymous function declared in the
argument. It made more sense to people when you create a function called
callback, and pass a reference to that in.

I think a 'learnyoujavascript' would have been valuable for these people.
Perhaps I should have pointed them to a JavaScript tutorial or book prior
to the workshop.

The feedback was very positive on the quality of the tutorial package,
people were impressed with how sophisticated the testing was on verify

We had a couple of technical issues with laptops, and I ended up lending
my laptop to someone as we couldn't get learnyounode to work (I'll report
the issue separately). I suggest organisers have a couple of spare machines
just in case.

We had to ask for more power sockets. I would suggest organisers bring a
few spare 4 way adaptors.

Everyone enjoyed the afternoon, everyone learnt something, and I think
everyone said they'd like to attend a future nodeschool event!

[image: highres_341026882]https://f.cloud.github.com/assets/353138/2395665/a18a3d2c-a9cc-11e3-8823-a49a1724567f.jpeg

Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/nodeschool/discussions/issues/93#issuecomment-37395477
.

@maxogden
Contributor

NodeSchool JSFest 2014 at Joyent In San Francisco

For JSFest @mikeal scheduled 3 separate nodeschool events over 2 days. Each was around 4 hours long and happened in a conference room at Joyent Inc in the SF financial district.

screen shot 2014-03-12 at 4 47 31 pm
screen shot 2014-03-12 at 4 47 37 pm

We didn't have a ton of space so we opened up 30 attendee spots and 15 mentor spots for each workshop.

Day 1 (2 back to back workshops): 15-20 attendees showed up, 5 mentors
Day 2 (1 morning workshop): 10 attendees, 4 mentors

Both days were really, really awesome. These were the smallest and longest workshops that I've hosted, and everyone got to know each other and establish a pretty good atmosphere/rapport.

photo 1029

We had a great group of attendees that ranged in experience. Because of the small size I had people do a round of "icebreaker" intros where they said their name, where they were from and what their programming history and aspirations were. It worked well and gave others a nice reference point to make small talk about later in the workshops.

We had some college students that were totally new to JS all the way up to one woman who is the author of a JavaScript book (and wanted to get into Node)!

The first day we did Learn You Node in the morning and Stream Adventure in the afternoon. @substack came by for Stream Adventure and helped facilitate. The majority of attendees stayed all day and continued working on Learn You Node during the second half of the day. Mentors were kept busy with lots of good discussions. Some attendees needed more explanations of JS concepts than others. I'd like to throw another +1 on the pile re: needing a intro JS workshopper.

photo 1025

Day 2 had less people (understandable - the weather was amazing outside and Fluent Conf also started that day). In spite of the small size it was actually better than day 1 IMO because we copied the Sinfo nodeschool and tried out their pairing technique.

We split attendees up into random pairs and dove into Level Me Up. The atmosphere on day 2 was incredible! Lots more overhearing of conversations and a better ambient noise level. We had an even number of attendees so nobody had to go it alone. From what I can tell everyone had a great experience in their pairs. Nobody had LevelDB experience and going through it with a partner didn't seem to detract in any way.

photo 1051

Lessons Learned

  • We should have paired from the start, and only done one day. Two days was a bit taxing on me in terms of time commitment.
  • Small groups are just as awesome as large groups
  • Ice breakers are worth it. Lots of great friendships were formed
@eugeneware

👍 on the intro to JS workshopper. Even amongst those who had some JS experience I was surprised at how many people had never heard or had used .forEach() or .map().

Dealing with the weird JS function scoping around for loops was quite tricky to explain too.

A JS for cats workshopper tool would be really cool.

And yes, the pairing thing was very successful. It definitely reduced the need for so many mentors as they were more effectively solving problems on their own, which was awesome to watch.

It was also great to see many people attend all 3 of the workshops too. People really want to learn this stuff!

@olizilla

Go Norwich! Go JSFest!

@maxogden... first nodeconf, now this... I think @mikeal is trying to test your workshopper endurance limits. Next up: a 4 day nodeschool marathon, teaching bytewiser to a crowd of assembled deer and bobcats, as a walker creek warm up gig.

@jasonrhodes

This thread is amazing. Thanks to everyone for sharing their experiences here. I'm getting started planning our first nodeschool event in Baltimore and the information here has been a huge help so far.

If any of you have specific thoughts or want to follow our issue#1 planning discussion and offer advice, please feel free: baltimorenodeschool/baltimorenodeschool.github.io#1

Alternately, I think it would be great if any of you who have run events so far have gathered any quotes from attendees about how easy it was, how much they learned, etc. and posted them back here. I am focusing on getting a high turnout of people new to programming or new to Javascript and I think having testimonials from previous events would be a huge help, and probably to others starting events as well.

Thanks again, everyone!

@richorama

@jasonrhodes there may be some comments from attendees you could harvest from here: http://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/158375062/

@marxian
marxian commented Mar 13, 2014

After mentoring in Norwich I'd certainly echo the need for a nodeschool javascript workshopper. I spent at least as much time helping developers with language concepts as with node concepts. For the Java, .NET and C# folk I encountered it felt like what was needed was the "Functional Javascript" workshop but starting a couple of steps closer to the ground.

One or two were drawn to the event by excitement about node and went away additionally delighted by liberation from C-style loops...

I'd probably also have adjusted our table layout a little too. Anything that can maximise the number of immediate neighbours an attendee has will increase the quantity (and quality) of learning. In retrospect I think pairing is the way to go.

@sclarson

We had a typical classroom layout with everyone facing the same direction
and pairing with neighbors when they wanted. Next time we're going to
rearrange the tables so that pairs of tables face one another. We're
probably also going to encourage pairing a lot more. Especially those new
to JavaScript.

On Thu, Mar 13, 2014 at 4:09 PM, Rupert Redington
notifications@github.comwrote:

After mentoring in Norwich I'd certainly echo the need for a nodeschool
javascript workshopper. I spent at least as much time helping developers
with language concepts as with node concepts. For the Java, .NET and C#
folk I encountered it felt like what was needed was the "Functional
Javascript" workshop but starting a couple of steps closer to the ground.

One or two were drawn to the event by excitement about node and went away
additionally delighted by liberation from C-style loops...

I'd probably also have adjusted our table layout a little too. Anything
that can maximise the number of immediate neighbours an attendee has will
increase the quantity (and quality) of learning.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/nodeschool/discussions/issues/93#issuecomment-37587141
.

@maxogden
Contributor

Found this event through twitter, it wasn't on the nodeschool.io site but happened a couple days ago in Wisconsin! http://www.meetup.com/milwaukeejs/events/168041402/

@jarrettch

Any experiences of people having trouble getting mentors, and what they'd do differently? I'm thinking of planning an event in LA but given my lack of javascript experience relative to some who have facilitated nodeschool events elsewhere I'm wondering if I should find mentors before trying to secure a venue and whatnot.

Are most mentors friends/acquaintances or do they randomly sign up after an event is announced? Obviously spreading the word is key but I'd hate to spread the word and end up the only "mentor."

@hackygolucky
Member

@jarrettch we've leaned heavily on our local nodejs user group organizers for mentoring and they've been fantastic. If there isn't one in LA, I would suggest seeking help from JSLA. Met a couple of folk at nodeconf last year from that group and they were amazing.

@jarrettch

@hackygolucky thanks for the tips! Unfortunately it appears the So Cal node.js Meetup is inactive, but JS.LA is definitely active. Maybe I can convince them to put one together.

@mikeal
Member
mikeal commented Apr 3, 2014

@jarrettch you should reach out to @emkay, he's down in the LA scene. Also, if you're light on mentors you should definitely go with the pairing setup that @maxogden mentioned earlier, it encourages the attendees to help each other a lot more.

@emkay
Member
emkay commented Apr 7, 2014

@jarrettch js.la is planning one now. :)

@jarrettch

@emkay yeah, I reached out to Carlo last week and he told me about it. Thanks! Looking forward to it!

@julianduque

NodeSchool Medellin v2 - Streams Adventure!

Event was awesome and people from the local community was really happy with this new edition of NodeSchool \o/.

Attendance was limited to 30 people due to space limitations but around 70 people registered to the event, next time we will see if we can do like two events in a day or weekend to educate all the people.

Only 1 mentor was available (me) but plan is to have more people mentoring, good thing was that attendees paired with others and together they figured it out the solutions.

And we gave some home made swag provided by a member of the local maker community.

Thanks to Atom House and MedellinJS community :)

@hackygolucky
Member

Oh man, awesome!

On Sun, Apr 13, 2014 at 5:49 PM, Julian Duque notifications@github.comwrote:

NodeSchool Medellin v2 - Streams Adventure!

Event was awesome and people from the local community was really happy
with this new edition of NodeSchool \o/.

https://camo.githubusercontent.com/fc74d7aac728578c59db43170fc0b2e71032dd32/68747470733a2f2f7062732e7477696d672e636f6d2f6d656469612f426c43594d5074494541414d53314f2e6a7067

Attendance was limited to 30 people due to space limitations but around 70
people registered to the event, next time we will see if we can do like two
events in a day or weekend to educate all the people.

https://camo.githubusercontent.com/8247fa10bf2e02349eb78bd6702c6eba23f7a41f/68747470733a2f2f7062732e7477696d672e636f6d2f6d656469612f426c434c6d4e4449414141324a35792e6a70673a6c61726765

Only 1 mentor was available (me) but plan is to have more people
mentoring, good thing was that attendees paired with others and together
they figured it out the solutions.

And we gave some home made swag provided by a member of the local maker
community.

https://camo.githubusercontent.com/780f1c1ea9861b31fae6c65e2b058b428486685b/68747470733a2f2f7062732e7477696d672e636f6d2f6d656469612f426c436b466e70495941414e434d722e6a7067

Thanks to Atom House http://en.atomhouse.co/ and MedellinJShttp://www.meetup.com/MedellinJS/events/175162032/community :)

Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHubhttps://github.com/nodeschool/discussions/issues/93#issuecomment-40325669
.

@maxogden
Contributor

nodeschool Tour of Norway just wrapped up last night! check out the awesome page that the web rebels made for it (with photos of each event): https://www.webrebels.org/tour

@iancrowther
Member

@maxogden - tour of Norway looked like great fun.. to be fair webrebels looks solid too!

@hayeah
hayeah commented Jun 10, 2014

NodeSchool Chengdu had 40 people showing up, and 6 coaches. Despite our inexperience in hosting events, the attendants learned some NodeJS, and asked for follow up events. We used Learn You Node.

Chengdu is a metrapolis in central China, pop. 14 million, known for pandas, silk, and its fiery cuisine. Nowadays it has a vibrant and growing gaming industry. Come visit!

I am writing this wrap-up so next time I can avoid the same noob mistakes. Perhaps other organizers in China can use my plan as a starting point.

Attendents

By professions (vagrant is a joke category... ):

By tech background:

The Venue

We borrowed Hoolai Games' office space in software park.

  • Plenty of chairs and table space
  • Lots of power plugs
  • Air conditioned and well-lit
  • Whiteboard & projector available
  • Wifi

Preparation

We asked attendents to install NodeJS and NodeSchool before the event. We also told them that if they don't know how, don't worry about it. Just come and we'll help them setup.

As other NodeSchool evenets had warned, we expected wifi to be flaky at best. So I made the followings available on a USB drive:

  • VirtualBox installers for Windows and OSX.
  • Virtual Machine with NodeSchool and Sublime editor (ubuntu 12.04).
    • Built with VirtualBox.
    • Exported to ".ova" format, which is compatible with VirtualBox and VMWare.
    • The exported VM image is about 1G.
    • The running image requires 512MB of RAM.
  • Screencast explaining how to use the Virtual Machine.

Also, following Max Ogden's idea, I made a static website running on local network with basic information about NodeSchool. The USB drive's content is available for download via the static site as well.

If you want the VM image, email me. I'll find a place to upload it. The screencast I made is in Chinese.

The Schedule

  • 1:45pm - Arrival
  • 2:00pm -> 2:10pm - Introduction to event and coaches.
  • 2:10pm -> 2:40pm - Lightning Talks.
  • 2:40pm -> 3:00pm - NodeSchool Demo
  • 3:00pm -> 3:15pm - Attendents Pairing
  • 3:15pm -> 5:00pm - NodeSchool
  • 5:00pm -> 5:30pm - Wrap-up

Problems

Stupid mistakes were made...

  • No Mac adapter for projector... so the talks and demo (except one) were canceled.
  • Brought home-baked cookies, but forgot to hand them out.
  • Event was initially announced with a different venue. Confusion and frantic notifications days before the event.
  • Email delivery to Chinese mail services (QQ, NetEase, etc.) is flaky.

Things To Improve

  • Don't change venue (duh).
  • Should've asked for phone numbers, and send SMS for reminders.
  • Use multiple channels to send reminders: email, sms, wechat group.
  • Bring more USB drives in a file system format that both Mac and Windows can read.
  • Although we encouraged pairing, most people didn't. Only people who came with real-life friends or co-worker paired.
  • It would've been helpful to record screencasts that solves the first 2 challenges, to show people how to interact with the nodeschool program.
  • Didn't close the event well. Haphazardly said, "ok guys, event's over. Feel free to stay or chat."
  • Some people didn't interact with their table mates much.
  • Would be nice to have schwags to hand out...
  • Would be nice to showcase some cool nodejs projects, because while many people have heard of "high-concurrency" and "async", they don't know what to build with NodeJS.

Checklist

Here's a checklist I'd use next time for hosting NodeSchool:

Pre-Planning

  • Go through this thread to learn from other NodeSchool organizers
  • Add your event to the NodeSchool spreadsheet

Choose a venue

  • Does the projector work?
  • Enough power plugs?
  • Wifi?
  • Enough chairs and tables?
  • How many people can it fit?
  • Is the venue publicly accessible? (keycard?)
  • Are there other things going on? (Cafe? People working?)

Announcement - (2 weeks in advance)

  • Create event announcement
    • Date and time
    • Contact info of organizer
    • Venue
    • Fee (or say "free")
    • Event size limit
    • Level of experience required (or say "none")
    • Equipment required (laptop. Mac or Windows)
    • The announcement: gist
  • Sign up form should ask for:
    • Name
    • email
    • Phone number
    • Level of NodeJS experience
    • Level of JavaScript experience
    • Why do you want to attend (interesting insight here)
  • Ask local community to retweet event
  • Find volunteers to help

Preparation

  • NodeSchool VM
  • Screencast to demo how to use VM
  • Screencast to demo NodeSchool
  • VM & videos on USB drives

Reminder - (2 days in advance)

  • Ask attendents to install NodeSchool
  • Direction/Map to event venue
  • Reminder of event time
  • Ask attendents to arrive 15 minutes early
  • Invitation to join a chat group of some sort (WeChat in China)

Day of Event

  • Arrive 30 minutes earlier
  • Post wifi & password on the wall
  • Post local IP of event web site
  • Give out cards for people to write their names on
  • Help early arrivers to install environment if necessary
  • Demo NodeSchool live
    • show how to run an exercise
    • show how to debug
    • show how to open documentation locally
    • show how to use dependencies preinstalled by learnyounode
  • Announce that screencasts are available on event site

Wrap up

  • Take a group photo
  • Encourage people to stay around and chat

Thanks

Thanks to all the attendents who came, and the coaches for their time and patience:

@jlord
jlord commented Jun 10, 2014

@hayeah That's a great write up, thank you!

@hackygolucky
Member

Holy smokes @hayeah that's a very helpful post!!!

On Tue, Jun 10, 2014 at 9:13 AM, Jessica Lord notifications@github.com
wrote:

@hayeah https://github.com/hayeah That's a great write up, thank you!


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub
#93 (comment)
.

@mikeal
Member
mikeal commented Jun 10, 2014

@hayeah this is one of the best writeups I've seen yet!

We should take a lot of these points and work them in to a checklist that can help organizers.

@brianloveswords

@hayeah woo, this is awesome!

NodeSchool Chengdu had 40 people showing up, and 6 coaches. Despite our inexperience in hosting events, the attendants learned some NodeJS, and asked for follow up events.

Congrats! If people are asking for follow-up events, you are doing something right.

Brought home-baked cookies, but forgot to hand them out.

Aww bummer – but that's rad that you made cookies :)

@mikeal – A general checklist definitely sounds like a good idea to me.

@eddieajau

👍 @hayeah - great write-up. I'd see if you can add that as a "How to run your own Node School event" page on https://github.com/nodeschool/nodeschool.github.io

@hayeah
hayeah commented Jun 11, 2014

@brianloveswords thanks for the kind words : ) Hopefully next time we can do a better job.

@eddieajau @mikeal I guess I'll go ahead and create a checklist page for "How to run nodeschool event". Then you guys can add more stuff to it as appropriate.

@hybrisCole

Hey :),

Just wanted to share some nice pics from our Costa Rican nodeschool event that happened today :)

http://www.meetup.com/costaricajs/photos/22683872/#377534292

The attendants were really excited and they are definitely going to finish all the exercises!

@rsoares
rsoares commented Jul 16, 2014

Hey!
So me and a couple of fellows are planning to run a nodeschool event in the south of Portugal, as part of our local tech meetup. I wanted to add the event to the nodeschool spreadsheet but it seems that's read only. Who can I reach to help me with this?

Thanks :)

@maxogden
Contributor

@jlord is the owner of the spreadsheet

@jlord
jlord commented Jul 16, 2014

@rsoares I just changed it so that anyone with the link can now edit ✏️ 🎉

@rsoares
rsoares commented Jul 16, 2014

Yay! Thanks @jlord and @maxogden!

@ralucas
Member
ralucas commented Jul 17, 2014

Hi guys,
Wanted to see if anyone had any suggestions on how to reach out to a wider audience? Like to see more people that may be interested in it, but don't know about the meetup page or nodeschool.io. Thanks.

Richard

@sclarson

Local universities, and asking meet up members to tell coworkers has had
great results for us.

I haven't tried it but you could also try cold contacting all the
developers you can find in your area on Linked In. I'd be more happy to be
told about user groups than I am to talk to more recruiters.

Members of our group have also contacted HR reps and dev managers at
companies and asked them to inform their people about it with varying
amounts of success.

On Wed, Jul 16, 2014 at 7:53 PM, Richard Lucas notifications@github.com
wrote:

Hi guys,
Wanted to see if anyone had any suggestions on how to reach out to a wider
audience? Like to see more people that may be interested in it, but don't
know about the meetup page or nodeschool.io. Thanks.

Richard


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub
#93 (comment)
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@gsf
gsf commented Jul 30, 2014

LibertyJS NodeSchool

the room

At LibertyJS last weekend here in Philadelphia we held a NodeSchool workshop in the morning. We had around 25 students and 3 mentors. We were lucky to have a beautiful space and no internet issues to speak of.

Recap

We started with a quick introduction of the mentors, then we checked general experience levels with Node around the room. There were 2 or 3 people who were familiar with Node at each cluster of tables already, so we left people sitting where they were. Then we dove into the "Hello World" exercise of learnyounode just to make sure everyone had the necessary pieces installed and understood how to progress through the workshopper menu.

The more experienced people mostly tackled the ExpressWorks and Stream and Browserify Adventure workshops while everyone else made their way through Learn You The Node.js For Much Win! The mentors circled, answering questions and encouraging people to talk to their neighbors. This really worked out well. For example, one student with a Windows machine wasn't too familiar with cmd, but a couple of other Windows users were able to get him all set up.

second pic of people

Conclusions

I don't have much in the "lessons learned" department because the event went really well thanks to the awesome workshops and the other writeups here. We had wise mentors, a nice mix of levels among the students, and a good atmosphere for learning and meeting people. While the official NodeSchool time was only a couple of hours in the morning, a number of people continued with their workshops in the afternoon during the open hack time. The essence of this tweet by @samuelcouch was echoed by many: "After playing with @nodejs a lot on Saturday at #libertyjs I'm excited to learn more about it. Pretty neat stuff!"

Thanks to @pselle and @jsacra for running Philadelphia JavaScript Developers and setting up LibertyJS, and thanks to my fellow NodeSchool mentors @nathanbowser and @cheyner.

@maxogden maxogden referenced this issue in nodeschool/oakland Aug 7, 2014
Closed

let's set up a recurring oakland nodeschool! #1

@orliesaurus

Just a heads up - we're running NodeSchool in London September the 10th more info on the london repo

@uptownhr

I ran a workshop not too long ago and thinking about running one on google hangout. Has anyone tried a workshop on google hangout before? Would love to hear some feedbacks and see if it worked out well or if others just think its a bad idea. Please let me know.

thanks.

@maxogden
Contributor

First Ever NodeSchool Taiwan

@substack, @jlord, @mafintosh and @watson and I are in Taipei this week for the JSDC conference. I met with @cfsghost at the Node.js Party last week (Node.js Party is the name of the Node.js meetup in Taipei) and we set up a Taiwan chapter for NodeSchool.

Then with only 24 hours notice (!!!) @clonn and the JSDC team got 60 attendees to come to the first dedicated NodeSchool Taiwan event. It was hosted in partnership with the Mozilla Taiwan Community Space in Taipei. They have a awesome event space next door to their regular community space that they rented out for the evening so we could hold all of the NodeSchoolers.

jpeg

The event went from 7 - 10pm. We started with me doing a intro to nodeschool and learnyounode, which was live translated into Chinese. I also showed people http://generalhenry.com/ as a fallback in case they couldn't get learnyounode installed.

After a few minutes @substack mentioned that he had recently found the javascripting workshop by @sethvincent, so we decided to tell attendees about it. Sure enough a lot of attendees lacked a lot of JS experience and immediately switched from learnyounode to javascripting.

Two women who attended, who both work at http://womany.net/, a lifestyle blog for women in Taiwan, stayed late and finished the javascripting workshop and are now planning on starting a regular class to get more women in Taiwan into web development by hosting javascripting workshops as a sort of gentle introduction to nodeschool in general.

I also tried a new technique that worked pretty well: using stickers as bait to get people to register on the Taiwan NodeSchool Team. Basically we announced that if you want NodeSchool + GitHub stickers you can come up to the front and enter your GitHub username into my laptop. I had them enter it into the 'Invite or add users to this team' field of the Taiwan team page under the NodeSchool org on GitHub. This page is not publicly viewable for some reason (I emailed GitHub today to ask why this is) but it looks like this:

screen shot 2014-10-14 at 4 24 53 pm

Now we have ~50 (43 plus 9 pending invitations) people on the Taiwan team, which means they can use the nodeschool/taiwan repo as a discussion board to talk about nodeschool stuff and plan future events in Chinese.

Also I spent yesterday hacking on localization for the nodeschool website, and @cfsghost translated it to Traditional Chinese today!

bz4d-q2cqaaqjfg

Also a lot of attendees had a hard time with learnyounode due to language barriers so some of the attendees started translating learnyounode to Traditional Chinese as well. There is this thread about translation support in learnyounode which suggests forking and translating today, and in the future @rvagg + the other maintainers will figure out a way to let the user easily switch languages.

The work in progress zh-tw version of learnyounode is at: https://github.com/cfsghost/learnyounode/tree/tanslation-zh-tw/exercises

@jasonrhodes

Awesome work, everyone! Great story and lots of great results!

On Oct 14, 2014, at 4:31 AM, Max Ogden notifications@github.com wrote:

First Ever NodeSchool Taiwan

@substack, @jlord, @mafintosh and @watson and I are in Taipei this week for the JSDC conference. I met with @cfsghost at the Node.js Party last week (Node.js Party is the name of the Node.js meetup in Taipei) and we set up a Taiwan chapter for NodeSchool.

Then with only 24 hours notice (!!!) @clonn and the JSDC team got 60 attendees to come to the first dedicated NodeSchool Taiwan event. It was hosted in partnership with the Mozilla Taiwan Community Space in Taipei. They have a awesome event space next door to their regular community space that they rented out for the evening so we could hold all of the NodeSchoolers.

The event went from 7 - 10pm. We started with me doing a intro to nodeschool and learnyounode, which was live translated into Chinese. I also showed people http://generalhenry.com/ as a fallback in case they couldn't get learnyounode installed.

After a few minutes @substack mentioned that he had recently found the javascripting workshop by @sethvincent, so we decided to tell attendees about it. Sure enough a lot of attendees lacked a lot of JS experience and immediately switched from learnyounode to javascripting.

Two women who attended (they both work at http://womany.net/, a lifestyle blog for Women in Taiwan, stayed late and finished the javascripting workshop and are now planning on starting a regular class to get more women in Taiwan into web development by hosting javascripting workshops as a sort of gentle introduction to nodeschool in general.

I also tried a new technique that worked pretty well: using stickers as bait to get people to register on the Taiwan NodeSchool Team. Basically we announced that if you want NodeSchool + GitHub stickers you can come up to the front and enter your GitHub username into my laptop. I had them enter it into the 'Invite or add users to this team' field of the Taiwan team page under the NodeSchool org on GitHub. This page is not publicly viewable for some reason (I emailed GitHub today to ask why this is) but it looks like this:

Now we have ~50 (43 plus 9 pending invitations) people on the Taiwan team, which means they can use the nodeschool/taiwan repo as a discussion board to talk about nodeschool stuff and plan future events in Chinese.

Also I spent yesterday hacking on localization for the nodeschool website, and @cfsghost translated it to Traditional Chinese today!

Also a lot of attendees had a hard time with learnyounode due to language barriers so some of the attendees started translating learnyounode to Traditional Chinese as well. There is this thread about translation support in learnyounode which suggests forking and translating today, and in the future @rvagg + the other maintainers will figure out a way to let the user easily switch languages.

The work in progress zh-tw version of learnyounode is at: https://github.com/cfsghost/learnyounode/tree/tanslation-zh-tw/exercises


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub.

@emkay emkay referenced this issue in nodeschool/los-angeles Oct 21, 2014
Closed

November 8th Planning #1

5 of 7 tasks complete
@emkay
Member
emkay commented Oct 22, 2014

Hey did anyone ever make NodeSchool stickers?

@finnp
Member
finnp commented Oct 22, 2014

@emkay We printed some for NodeSchool Berlin (nodeschool/berlin#3). Also @maxogden printed some with the logo (see tweet)

@emkay
Member
emkay commented Oct 22, 2014

Hey all, I made this https://github.com/emkay/all-the-workshops for quickly making *.tgz files with bundled dependencies in case wifi breaks at events and we had to throw them up on the local network or do the USB stick shuffle. Haven't tested it out at a real event yet, but will do so at our event coming up. Probably better ways to do this.

@maxogden maxogden referenced this issue in nodeschool/newsletter Oct 28, 2014
Closed

newsletter #1 #1

@maxogden
Contributor

First ever NodeSchool Tokyo

Today I helped run a NodeSchool event at the NodeFest.jp conference in Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan.

img_7003

It is a two track conference, and we had 2 hours in one of the tracks dedicated to the NodeSchool.

To prepare, I forked learnyounode, browserify-adventure and levelmeup, added @martinheidegger and @yuskesh as collaborators and then they translated the challenges to Japanese.

I simply forked, renamed e.g. learnyounode to learnyounode-jp, and then published each one to npm. So now you can npm install learnyounode-jp (or the other two as well) and it installs the Japanese version of learnyounode.

screen shot 2014-11-15 at 2 34 21 pm

At first there was a bug in workshopper that wasn't calculating widths correctly for multibyte wide characters but I fixed it in a PR:

Before:

screen shot 2014-11-14 at 4 17 59 pm

After:

screen shot 2014-11-14 at 4 17 35 pm

We had around 5 mentors, and they all spoke Japanese except for me :P As a result I wasn't as helpful, but the other mentors were. I did a 10 minute introduction at the beginning and it was live translated by @martinheidegger. In the introduction I explained NodeSchool, showed how to install learnyounode-jp and then did the first two challenges. This is an idea I stole from NodeSchool London. In the past I only showed the Hello World challenge but they show Baby Steps as well, and it really makes a difference.

It was really difficult to get attendees to pair program or raise their hands, so we had to individually ask all attendees if they had any questions to get them to ask for assistance.

In general we have a lot of work to do to make multi language support in workshoppers better. I've opened another issue here to discuss it more:

nodeschool/organizers#64

@martinheidegger
Contributor

NodeSchool Osaka Kick-Off

Yesterday I kicked off the first NodeSchool in Osaka. Because I organised it, it also lay upon me to hold the introduction. This meant that people had to sit through my broken japanese (not as good as I should be). As far as I could tell I faired okay but: who knows...

2014-12-04 20 50 32_cut

From the 31 people that signed up 25 showed up which is not all bad considering a quite cold thursday evening and after hours. We had 5 mentors which were busy most of the time and unlike the silence in Tokyo we managed to raise the interaction level somehow. A few even worked together!

Location

We had enough space, power outlets and projectors at the kindly shared meeting room of FirstServer who avidly supports the Osaka'n Node community.

Unfortunately the wifi just flatlined before anything had even started (broken router). We helped ourselves with mobile internet (broadly available in japan) and it went surprisingly well. All of the people were able to use to the only workshop that was entirely translated to japanese (learnyounode-jp) and even some necessary node installations worked just fine (4G for the win).

Extras

I prepared NodeSchool stickers and entrance signs that were recieved welcoming. Since they were on my own dime I asked people for a little support. The request was kindly answered:

nodeschoolosa1_2

Preparation

For the workshop we finished translating the learnyounode-jp workshopper that has been used in Tokyo which was necessary. Some of the members had serious struggles when they tried the english workshoppers thus we think improving the translation really would help a lot. Due to a last minute change in the translation one of the topics was broken when the school started. We had to hot-fix it.

I was about to setup USB sticks as well but my spare time ran out. They would have been massively helpful. Next time I will take proper time to prepare usb sticks (Sorry @hayeah for taking up your time).

We used doorkeeper (japanese version of meetup, quite useful actually) to organise the event and think we will do so again in future.

Success

One member managed to finish 10 steps of learnyounode. He got a hug from me and applause from the others. We are looking forward to a leaderboard. Of the people that attended most finished at least 3 steps on their own, fairly many achived 5. This number looks low but considering that more than 50% of the people hadn't installed node yet it seems okay.

@kamiyam had the great idea to explain the 5 first steps of learnyounode at the end. Very useful and a great ending.

Technical Issues

I am not sure if its an issue only I have but the colors of the code-coloring have been proven unreadable on a Projector. Shouldn't this be brighter?

screenshot 2014-12-05 02 34 47

The current fork system for the translations has been botherful to some people since they forgot to add the -jp at the end. They ended up with the english version and struggle with it until I recognised it.

Questions

During the presentation we were explicitly asked for a 'socket.io' workshopper. I asked for one in the workshopper issue board. Unless someone else takes this on I promised to work on it before the next event in january.

Lessons Learned

  • Prepare USB sticks (its not optional!)
  • Check that the air conditioning (heating) is set to a level where students dont have it too hot/cold.
  • 2 hour events might be too short for japanese to get anywhere will stick with the 3 hour length for now.
  • Always test the most common workshopper before class.
@mikeal
Member
mikeal commented Dec 5, 2014

I want one of those stickers so bad :)

@denzelwamburu

I Want to host a node event at my campus,i love the web and hardware a lot and i wanna teach other guys around here the same thing.The issue is that i have no experience with running node events and i haven't been into one either :( and to be frank i don't know where to start

@martinheidegger
Contributor

@denzelwamburu First step would be to open a new issue in this issue tracker in which you tell people where you want to have a meetup and that you need help with (x), (y), (z)

@denzelwamburu

@martinheidegger let me try that

@iancrowther
Member

in lieu of an issue link..

@denzelwamburu book a room, setup a http://ti.to for tkt reg and plug the link around campus... leave a printout in the computer labs or something.. keep it small 5-10 and you'll figure out your own style and format :-) good luck!

@denzelwamburu

There hasn't been such an event around here before and people are familiar to such events either.It's kind of a marginalized place with slow internet connectivity plus other minor challenges here and there but people love tech a lot.I will try starting small.Of course i will let you know.
Cheers.

@emilyrose

I'm interested in working on a nodeschool course around hardware hacking with Spark hardware. Is there an existing nodeschool like this in the bay area?

@nvcexploder

That sounds rad! We need to start one in Portland too! :D

On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 9:26 AM, E̵̘̳̘̝ṃ̟͈͙̗̹͘i͖͇ḷ͚͔̱̰̠y͜
̩̲͕R̮̜͓̫o͉̣̦̘̖̖ͅs̫̣͜e̼͖̹̩͉͉͠ notifications@github.com wrote:

I'm interested in working on a nodeschool course around hardware hacking
with Spark hardware. Is there an existing nodeschool like this in the bay
area?


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub
#93 (comment)
.

@maxogden
Contributor

@emilyrose the SF nodeschool just got off the ground, and they are doing a mighty fine job if I do say so myself http://nodeschool.io/sanfrancisco/

@emilyrose

@maxogden ah, this is perfect. thank you! 😸

@RichardLitt
Member

This thread is immense and unwieldy. How do you feel about me going through, picking out all of the relevant points of advice, compiling a document, and then using that as a pointer for people? We can continue discussion here, or in smaller, more pointed issues.

@RichardLitt RichardLitt referenced this issue in nodeschool/organizers May 3, 2015
Closed

Structuring Post-school Write Ups #209

@mikeal
Member
mikeal commented May 4, 2015

@RichardLitt most of the advice was already picked out by @maxogden and documented here http://nodeschool.io/host.html

@RichardLitt
Member

@mikeal Cool. I saw that; I got the impression I was supposed to read this entire thread before hosting a NodeSchool, or add an update in here about how mine went. The discussion in nodeschool/organizers#209 might fix that impression. Or a tag on that page saying you don't have to read this whole thing.

@maxogden
Contributor
maxogden commented May 5, 2015

@richardlitt +1 to condensing this thread down into a smaller list of
awesomeness. the host.html page is pretty light and could use more content

On Mon, May 4, 2015 at 6:03 PM, Richard Littauer notifications@github.com
wrote:

@mikeal https://github.com/mikeal Cool. I saw that; I got the
impression was supposed to read this entire thread before hosting a
NodeSchool, or add an update in here about how mine went. The discussion in
nodeschool/organizers#209
nodeschool/organizers#209 might fix that
impression. Or a tag on that page saying you don't have to read this whole
thing.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub
#93 (comment)
.

@itopa
itopa commented Feb 27, 2016

I need to re-activate Nodeschool Lagos (which has been inactive). I spoke to the organizer and he's okay with me going ahead. However, I need help to reset user and start putting information on the web site. Can anyone help with advise?

@SomeoneWeird
Member

@dipolediamond can you confirm you're okay with this?

@SomeoneWeird
Member

@nodeschoolbot add-user itopa

@nodeschoolbot

I have added @itopa to the chapter-organizers team.

@a0viedo a0viedo referenced this issue in nodeschool/organizers Mar 25, 2016
Closed

New Chapter for Panama City, Panama #335

@werose
werose commented Sep 19, 2016

+1

@Sequoia Sequoia closed this Sep 19, 2016
@Sequoia Sequoia locked and limited conversation to collaborators Sep 19, 2016
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