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@@ -672,7 +672,7 @@ Just like how presentations deprecate, so do UX patterns. There are a plethora o
* **Back Buttons** - Popularized by iOS, back buttons have become popular especially with designed that try to mimic app-like interfaces. Don't use them. Every browser has a native, easily accessible, well integrated back button; one that behaves better than any that could or should be built.
* **Page Preloaders** - Users want to get to a site's content as quickly as possible. If instead of providing it a preloader is put up that is designed to halt a user from getting content until every piece that makes up that content is available, a user is likely to [leave and not come back](#performance)
* **Social Integration** - While social integration is often seen as a great boon, more often than not the plethora of third party logos scattered throughout a page make a site look more like NASCAR than a finely crafted brand. While the effect of this hasn't been thoroughly researched yet, there is one truth; social integration provides free advertising for those social networks and ties the site's branding to those social networks, for better or worse.
- * **Buttons** - Social share buttons are one of the worst additions one can make to a site. Besides being [terrible](http://zurb.com/article/883/small-painful-buttons-why-social-media-bu) for [performance](http://lastdropofink.co.uk/market-places/the-true-cost-of-adding-social-buttons/) (findings suggest that they bloat load times enough to break ideal and maybe even maximum [page load times](#payload-performance)), they have a tendency to add lots of clutter to a page; Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ for the page, the article, the gallery, and each image at a given URL? As pointed out by [Oliver Reichenstein](http://theoatmeal.com/comics/facebook_likes), users who use these social networks already know how to find content and certainly know how to share URLs. In fact, Smashing Magazine removed Facebook buttons from their site and traffic from Facebook increased because [users shared the content organically instead](https://twitter.com/smashingmag/status/204955763368660992). As stated in Oliver's article, and reinforced (humorously) by [Matthew Inman](http://theoatmeal.com/comics/facebook_likes), the best way to increase social traffic to a site is to have good content that people organically want to share, not to have social media buttons.
+ * **Buttons** - Social share buttons are one of the worst additions one can make to a site. Besides being [terrible](http://zurb.com/article/883/small-painful-buttons-why-social-media-bu) for [performance](http://lastdropofink.co.uk/market-places/the-true-cost-of-adding-social-buttons/) (findings suggest that they bloat load times enough to break ideal and maybe even maximum [page load times](#payload-performance)), they have a tendency to add lots of clutter to a page; Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ for the page, the article, the gallery, and each image at a given URL? As pointed out by [Oliver Reichenstein](http://ia.net/blog/sweep-the-sleaze/), users who use these social networks already know how to find content and certainly know how to share URLs. In fact, Smashing Magazine removed Facebook buttons from their site and traffic from Facebook increased because [users shared the content organically instead](https://twitter.com/smashingmag/status/204955763368660992). As stated in Oliver's article, and reinforced (humorously) by [Matthew Inman](http://theoatmeal.com/comics/facebook_likes), the best way to increase social traffic to a site is to have good content that people organically want to share, not to have social media buttons.
* **Login** - While less harmful than social share buttons, social login buttons should be approached with a similar amount of caution, but for different reasons. Social login buttons put security into the hands of a 3rd party and tie users to that 3rd party; if either go down or are compromised for any reason, there is nothing that can be done by a site owner. They also have the possibility of increasing cognitive load by making a user remember which method they used to log in last time. Finally, as MailChimp found out [after they added, then removed social login](http://blog.mailchimp.com/social-login-buttons-arent-worth-it/), that improving failed login attempts is more about good error handling and content than adding social login.
* **Content Pagination** - Users are very comfortable scrolling vertically on a page and have a tendency to get frustrated when content is paginated unnecessarily. Only paginate content if it is absolutely necessary, and even then provide users a way of viewing the full contents on a single page.
* **Content Insertionals** - Seen often in article views, content insertionals are usually links to other tangentially related content in-between paragraphs as a stand-alone paragraph or as non-hyperlink "links" in an article that produce a hover or click modal of other, likewise tangentially related content. These items take the user's attention and prevent them from being immersed in the content.

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