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<title>Does quantity + learning = quality? </title>
<p>
I've challenged myself to <strong>write something of value every day</strong> on my blog, now.
</p><p>
It was inspired by <a href="http://sethgodin.typepad.com/">Seth Godin</a>, but also by this excerpt from the book <a href="http://www.kk.org/cooltools/archives/000216.php">Art and Fear</a>:
</p>
<blockquote><p>
The ceramics teacher announced he was dividing his class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio would be <strong>graded solely on the quantity of work they produced</strong>, all those on the right <strong>graded solely on its quality</strong>.
</p><p>
His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would weigh the work of the “quantity” group: 50 pounds of pots rated an A, 40 pounds a B, and so on. Those being graded on “quality”, however, needed to produce only one pot - albeit a perfect one - to get an A.
</p><p>
Well, come grading time and a curious fact emerged: <strong>the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity!</strong>
</p><p>
It seems that while the “quantity” group was busily churning out piles of work - and learning from their mistakes - the “quality” group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay.
</p></blockquote>
<p>
Is there something in your life that you're trying to perfect?
</p><p>
Have you tried a quantity approach instead?
</p><p>
(Just make sure to learn from your mistakes.)
</p>
<img src="http://sivers.org/images/lanterns.jpg" width="500" height="313" alt="http://www.flickr.com/photos/7455207@N05/3001727087/" />