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<title>Double-speed! Half-speed! Up an octave! Down an octave! </title>
<h3>Singing:</h3>
<p>
I used to take voice lessons from <a href="http://www.warrensenders.com/">Warren Senders</a>.
</p><p>
For each lesson, I'd bring in one song I was trying to improve.
</p><p>
First, I'd sing it for him as-is.
</p><p>
Then he'd say, “OK - <strong>now do it up an octave</strong>.”
</p><p>
“Uh... up an octave?”
</p><p>
“Yes! Go! 1.. 2.. 3.. 4..”
</p><p>
I'd sing the whole song again, in screeching squeaking falsetto, sounding like an undead cartoon mouse. But by the second half of the song, it was almost charming.
</p><p>
Then he'd say, “OK - <strong>now do it down an octave</strong>.”
</p><p>
“Down an octave? But I don't think I can!”
</p><p>
“Let's try! Go! 1.. 2.. 3.. 4..”
</p><p>
Have you ever tried to sing lower than your voice really goes? Mine sounded like a garbage disposal or lawn mower, but he kept saying, “Pitch!” - and the point was the control of the vocal chords down in that chaotic range and the intense focus it takes to hear the pitch in a creak.
</p><p>
Then he'd say, “OK. Back to normal pitch, but <strong>double-time! 1!2!3!4!</strong>”
</p><p>
I'd sing the whole song twice as fast, which brought out different rhythmic phrasing and articulation challenges.
</p><p>
Then he'd say, “OK. Relax. Now do it <strong>half-speed. 1 . . . 2 . . . 3 . . . 4 . . .</strong>”
</p><p>
Singing a song half-speed really brings a microscope to its details!
</p><p>
<strong>Now sing it like Bob Dylan. Go! Now Björk. Go! Tom Waits! Go!</strong>
</p><p>
<strong>Now sing it like I just woke you up at 4am. Now like it's a chant at a football game!</strong>
</p><p>
We'd end with me singing the song at its original speed in my normal voice, like I did the very first time. But of course it sounded different - like seeing your home town after being away for years.
</p><p>
If you care about a song, it's worth an hour of experimentation. Realizing <strong>the initial choices you made are just one of many</strong> brings all kinds of weathered wisdom and perspective to your song.
</p>
<hr /><h3>Business:</h3>
<p>
<strong>I'm taking an entrepreneurship class now</strong>. I've never studied business before.
</p><p>
<strong>We analyzed a business plan for a mail-order pantyhose company.</strong>
</p><p>
After reading the whole thing, I felt like my old voice teacher:
</p><ul>
<li>“OK - <strong>make a plan that only requires $1000.</strong> Go!”</li>
<li>“Now <strong>make a plan for 10-times as many customers</strong>. Go!”</li>
<li>“Now <strong>do it without a website</strong>. Go!”</li>
<li>“Now <strong>make all your initial assumptions wrong, and have it work anyway</strong>. Go!”</li>
<li>“Now <strong>show how you would franchise it</strong>. Go!”</li>
</ul>
<p>
You can't pretend there's only one way to do it! <strong>No business goes as planned</strong>, so make 10 radically different plans.
</p><p>
Realizing <strong>the initial choices you made are just one of many</strong> brings all kinds of weathered wisdom and insight into your business.
</p>
<hr /><h3>Life:</h3>
<ul>
<li>Now you're living in New York City, obsessed with success. Go!</li>
<li>Now you're a free spirit, backpacking around Thailand. Go!</li>
<li>Now you're a confident extrovert and everyone loves you. Go!</li>
<li>Now you're married and your kids are your life. Go!</li>
<li>Now you spend a few years in relative seclusion, reading and walking. Go!</li>
</ul>
<p>... bringing all kinds of weathered wisdom and perspective into your life.</p>
<img src="http://sivers.org/images/hair.jpg" width="377" height="500" alt="" />
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