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<title>What's the difference between like, love, and in-love? </title>
<p>
What's the difference between like, love, and in-love?
</p><p>
How do you know when you <em>love</em> someone instead of just liking them a lot?
</p><p>
How do you know when you're “<em>in</em>-love” with someone instead of just loving them as a person?
</p><p>
I asked a bunch of friends these questions, and got a huge variety of answers:
</p>
<blockquote>
“If I like anything about someone, I like them. If I like everything about someone, I love them. If I like everything about someone and we have great sex, I'm in love.”
</blockquote>
<blockquote>
“Like is liking someone, but conditionally. Love is liking someone unconditionally. In-love is just glorification of a temporary infatuation. Eventually it becomes love.”
</blockquote>
<blockquote>
“This sounds morbid, but I think of it in terms of how I'd react if they died. If I like someone and they died, I'd be sad and cry once or twice. If I love someone and they died, I'd be devastated and cry for days or weeks. If I'm in love with someone and they died, I'd want to die too.”
</blockquote>
<p>
How do <em>you</em> know?
</p><p>
Do other languages have different terms for “love” versus “in love” that make it more poetically distinct?
</p><p>
C'mon songwriters, I know you've thought about this. <img src="http://sivers.org/images/icon_smile.gif" width="15" height="15" alt="smile" />
</p>
<img src="http://sivers.org/images/couple.jpg" width="500" height="400" alt="http://www.flickr.com/photos/adwriter/257937032/" />
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