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My portfolio website ported to Gatsby/React from plain PHP.
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README.md

Eric Johnson's Portfolio Site, NOW IN REACT!

Introduction

I wanted to do a project in React and I ran across Gatsby, Facebook's React-based static site generator. Gatsby looked like a slick project with a lot of traction, and it seemed like a good fit to convert my portfolio from a PHP architecture to a React architecture.

The conversion to Gatsby/React went relatively smoothly and helped me modularlize my code further. I did run into a couple hiccups when trying to use Sass files which imported other Sass files containing relatively pathed images . I found a solution using a Webpack loader called resolve-url-loader, and I created an issue with the gatsby-plugin-sass plugin.

Local Setup

You can clone this repo and run

  • npm install
  • npm install -g gatsby cli
  • gatsby develop (starts local server)

You may have to update your node/npm to a recent version. Here is a link to Gatsby's docs for further reading/help.

CSS Structure

I used Sass for my CSS pre-processor. I plan to integrate CSS variables in the future, but for now haven't used them.

I decided to try a form of BEM style naming for my CSS classes where I don't extend base classes, but I create mixins. The final CSS is much cleaner and readable using mixins.

For example I created site-wide mixins like

@mixin site__banner
  //...banner css...
  
.site__banner
  @include site__banner()

If you want to just use the default site__banner styles you can use the site__banner class, but if you need to tweak the banner CSS on a particular page, you can do

.about-page__banner
  @include site__banner()
  //...custom css...

I like this approach because it gives you an easily searchable and authoritative source for all the CSS for a particular element. It also avoids a lot of abbreviated modifier CSS classes like site__banner f-large no-bg red. And you can easily override CSS if you need to just by putting it after your includes.

However, I haven't run this method by anyone else, so it could have some fatal flaws that I'm not seeing yet.

React

(more details forthcoming...)

Gatsby

(more details forthcoming...)

Testing

Jest and GhostInspector (more details forthcoming...)

TODO

  • Upgrade to Gatsby 2
  • Convert CSS to Styled Components
  • Responsive images
  • Remove duplicate generated CSS
  • Convert pixels to REMs
  • Accessibility testing/optimization
  • Implement smoother font loading
  • Add variable fonts
  • Improve copy with pull quotes, icons, and other flourishes
  • Add Cypress tests
  • Remove jQuery
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