New issue

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community.

By clicking “Sign up for GitHub”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy statement. We’ll occasionally send you account related emails.

Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account

Added PlusCode functionality to search #1818

Closed
wants to merge 1 commit into
base: master
from

Conversation

Projects
None yet
@jguthrie100
Contributor

jguthrie100 commented Apr 11, 2018

Implements #1807

Added PlusCode functionality to search
- Added PlusCode gem to Gemfile
- Implemented PlusCode search route
- Added tests
@jguthrie100

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@jguthrie100

jguthrie100 Apr 11, 2018

Contributor

Sorry, didn't see: tomhughes@2e0a2c6

Contributor

jguthrie100 commented Apr 11, 2018

Sorry, didn't see: tomhughes@2e0a2c6

@tomhughes

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@tomhughes

tomhughes Apr 12, 2018

Member

Sorry yes I have already knocked this, but I still haven't decided whether to offer it up or not as people are divided on whether it's a good idea.

Member

tomhughes commented Apr 12, 2018

Sorry yes I have already knocked this, but I still haven't decided whether to offer it up or not as people are divided on whether it's a good idea.

@jguthrie100 jguthrie100 deleted the jguthrie100:add_open_location_code branch Apr 26, 2018

@jguthrie100

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@jguthrie100

jguthrie100 Apr 26, 2018

Contributor

Seems like a good idea to me. Helpful to people who use PlusCodes and totally non-disruptive for people who don't..

Contributor

jguthrie100 commented Apr 26, 2018

Seems like a good idea to me. Helpful to people who use PlusCodes and totally non-disruptive for people who don't..

@govvin

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@govvin

govvin Jul 13, 2018

I would find this useful. OpenLocationCodes (or PlusCodes, as Google would like to call it) is already supported in the OsmAnd app.

govvin commented Jul 13, 2018

I would find this useful. OpenLocationCodes (or PlusCodes, as Google would like to call it) is already supported in the OsmAnd app.

@woodpeck

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@woodpeck

woodpeck Jul 13, 2018

Contributor

Helpful to people who use PlusCodes and totally non-disruptive for people who don't.

This is not correct. Endorsing a certain addressing system and thereby helping to make it popular can have a big impact on people who don't (want to) use it. Your reasoning could be used to support rolling out support for a proprietary addressing system ("doesn't hurt people who don't use it") and before you know it, 13 states in Africa have switched their addressing to the proprietary vendor and you've been one of the enablers.

We need clear guidelines like these rules covering the inclusion of tile layers for the support of third-party geocoders/search engines before we consider adding them.

I am not against adding support for OpenLocationCodes, as I think they would likely clear any sensible rules that we set up, but I don't want to add support "just like that" because before you know it you'll have three peddlers of proprietary addressing systems complaining "why not me".

Contributor

woodpeck commented Jul 13, 2018

Helpful to people who use PlusCodes and totally non-disruptive for people who don't.

This is not correct. Endorsing a certain addressing system and thereby helping to make it popular can have a big impact on people who don't (want to) use it. Your reasoning could be used to support rolling out support for a proprietary addressing system ("doesn't hurt people who don't use it") and before you know it, 13 states in Africa have switched their addressing to the proprietary vendor and you've been one of the enablers.

We need clear guidelines like these rules covering the inclusion of tile layers for the support of third-party geocoders/search engines before we consider adding them.

I am not against adding support for OpenLocationCodes, as I think they would likely clear any sensible rules that we set up, but I don't want to add support "just like that" because before you know it you'll have three peddlers of proprietary addressing systems complaining "why not me".

@sommerluk

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@sommerluk

sommerluk Jul 13, 2018

before you know it, 13 states in Africa have switched their addressing to the proprietary vendor

A valid concert. Many African countries do not have a working address system in use. Most streets don’t have names and even when they have names, the houses don’t have house numbers. There are some efforts for example in Benin, with financial support from France, to create public address systems (street names + house numbers based on mathematical measurement) but they are limited to some of the bigger cities. On the other hand, online-ordering and logistics are growing a lot currently in these countries, including small villages. So the post company of Ivory Coast is working since two years with what3words, which is proprietary and creates a vendor-look-in and can only be used by authorized apps and so on – something that in my opinion is not really helpful for the development in Ivory Coast.

sommerluk commented Jul 13, 2018

before you know it, 13 states in Africa have switched their addressing to the proprietary vendor

A valid concert. Many African countries do not have a working address system in use. Most streets don’t have names and even when they have names, the houses don’t have house numbers. There are some efforts for example in Benin, with financial support from France, to create public address systems (street names + house numbers based on mathematical measurement) but they are limited to some of the bigger cities. On the other hand, online-ordering and logistics are growing a lot currently in these countries, including small villages. So the post company of Ivory Coast is working since two years with what3words, which is proprietary and creates a vendor-look-in and can only be used by authorized apps and so on – something that in my opinion is not really helpful for the development in Ivory Coast.

@jguthrie100

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@jguthrie100

jguthrie100 Jul 13, 2018

Contributor

something that in my opinion is not really helpful for the development in Ivory Coast.

From a wholly academic perspective its maybe bad for a lock-in technology to be used for a public service, but I bet for the guy sitting in his house in the middle of a slum on the outskirts of Abidjan, and the postman looking to deliver his new microwave, its an absolute godsend, whether its proprietary or not!

If its so bad for public services to use proprietary technology then its up to the opensource standards community to come up with a better alternative, of which I'm not sure there are any that can rival what3words!

Contributor

jguthrie100 commented Jul 13, 2018

something that in my opinion is not really helpful for the development in Ivory Coast.

From a wholly academic perspective its maybe bad for a lock-in technology to be used for a public service, but I bet for the guy sitting in his house in the middle of a slum on the outskirts of Abidjan, and the postman looking to deliver his new microwave, its an absolute godsend, whether its proprietary or not!

If its so bad for public services to use proprietary technology then its up to the opensource standards community to come up with a better alternative, of which I'm not sure there are any that can rival what3words!

@woodpeck

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@woodpeck

woodpeck Jul 13, 2018

Contributor

The proprietary systems are not brilliant inventions or engineering feats; the only thing that sets them apart is their marketing and sales budget. Which they have precisely because they promise big profits down the line. Profits that the happy guy with his microwave will be paying for, one way or the other. Hence any rules about adding address/geocoding providers we come up with must include an open source requirement so that we don't become complicit to exploitation.

Contributor

woodpeck commented Jul 13, 2018

The proprietary systems are not brilliant inventions or engineering feats; the only thing that sets them apart is their marketing and sales budget. Which they have precisely because they promise big profits down the line. Profits that the happy guy with his microwave will be paying for, one way or the other. Hence any rules about adding address/geocoding providers we come up with must include an open source requirement so that we don't become complicit to exploitation.

@dieterdreist

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@dieterdreist

dieterdreist Jul 13, 2018

dieterdreist commented Jul 13, 2018

@sommerluk

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@sommerluk

sommerluk Jul 13, 2018

a better alternative, of which I'm not sure there are any that can rival what3words!

Well, in countries where much more than half of the territory do not have neither Internet coverage nor even mobile phone coverage and many villages not even electric power supply (they charge their smartphones – yes, they have smartphones – with photovoltaic) PlusCodes seem to be clearly the better choice than what3words – also from a technical point of view: No need for neither a 10 MB word database that works only for a particular language nor for an Internet connection. Instead light code that works also on older smartphones.

sommerluk commented Jul 13, 2018

a better alternative, of which I'm not sure there are any that can rival what3words!

Well, in countries where much more than half of the territory do not have neither Internet coverage nor even mobile phone coverage and many villages not even electric power supply (they charge their smartphones – yes, they have smartphones – with photovoltaic) PlusCodes seem to be clearly the better choice than what3words – also from a technical point of view: No need for neither a 10 MB word database that works only for a particular language nor for an Internet connection. Instead light code that works also on older smartphones.

@sabas

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@sabas

sabas Jul 31, 2018

I attended the Plus Codes presentation at SotM by @drinckes (there was also @janetchapman); it could be good to support this coding since it has an open license and as far as I understood is used in some places.
Apart the 'long' version, I wonder if it would be worth to support also the short version (this would need to resolve the name part to nominatim to calculate the area code I think).

It's already supported in GMaps and Maps.me.

sabas commented Jul 31, 2018

I attended the Plus Codes presentation at SotM by @drinckes (there was also @janetchapman); it could be good to support this coding since it has an open license and as far as I understood is used in some places.
Apart the 'long' version, I wonder if it would be worth to support also the short version (this would need to resolve the name part to nominatim to calculate the area code I think).

It's already supported in GMaps and Maps.me.

@Vaomatua

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@Vaomatua

Vaomatua Aug 9, 2018

The potential for Plus Codes is great, the addresses for every location on earth already exist, they can be derived offline, are concise, and recognizable. I've looked at many systems and feel that Plus Codes is the first one I've studied that makes sense anywhere in the world.
The Tanzania Development Trust has calculated the Plus Codes for 17 million building points in Tanzania. We did a test upload in the Zeze village as a way to see how it could work in OSM.

zeze

Vaomatua commented Aug 9, 2018

The potential for Plus Codes is great, the addresses for every location on earth already exist, they can be derived offline, are concise, and recognizable. I've looked at many systems and feel that Plus Codes is the first one I've studied that makes sense anywhere in the world.
The Tanzania Development Trust has calculated the Plus Codes for 17 million building points in Tanzania. We did a test upload in the Zeze village as a way to see how it could work in OSM.

zeze

@woodpeck

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@woodpeck

woodpeck Aug 9, 2018

Contributor

Frankly, this is the worst idea I have heard in years. Plus codes can be computed from coordinates, and coordinates can be computed from plus codes. The way to add plus codes to OSM is not adding plus code tags to objects in OSM (and you have added THREE of them). What you have done here is the informational equivalent of adding a "latitude" and "longitude" tag to every building. Please do not do that again.

Contributor

woodpeck commented Aug 9, 2018

Frankly, this is the worst idea I have heard in years. Plus codes can be computed from coordinates, and coordinates can be computed from plus codes. The way to add plus codes to OSM is not adding plus code tags to objects in OSM (and you have added THREE of them). What you have done here is the informational equivalent of adding a "latitude" and "longitude" tag to every building. Please do not do that again.

@Vaomatua

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@Vaomatua

Vaomatua Aug 9, 2018

Interesting perspective @woodpeck . If the tools existed to help people in Africa communicate their location easily this wouldn't be necessary. As it is, this is a better option that anything that exists, and certainly better than doing nothing.

Vaomatua commented Aug 9, 2018

Interesting perspective @woodpeck . If the tools existed to help people in Africa communicate their location easily this wouldn't be necessary. As it is, this is a better option that anything that exists, and certainly better than doing nothing.

@woodpeck

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@woodpeck

woodpeck Aug 9, 2018

Contributor

I think we may be miscommunicating. Can you explain in which way the plus codes that you have imported to OSM are used by the people in Africa? Are you loading the data from OSM onto a device that is not plus code capable, or are you printing the plus codes on maps, or what is the use case? What I want to say is that there is no use case that I can think of where it makes sense to have the data in OSM.

If someone wants to know their plus code, either they have access to the OSM web site or an offline app, which would mean the plus code can be computed by the OSM web site or the offline app. Or they do not have access to the OSM website or an app, in which case the plus code stored in OSM doesn't help either! Same situation if someone is given a plus code and wants to know where it is...

Contributor

woodpeck commented Aug 9, 2018

I think we may be miscommunicating. Can you explain in which way the plus codes that you have imported to OSM are used by the people in Africa? Are you loading the data from OSM onto a device that is not plus code capable, or are you printing the plus codes on maps, or what is the use case? What I want to say is that there is no use case that I can think of where it makes sense to have the data in OSM.

If someone wants to know their plus code, either they have access to the OSM web site or an offline app, which would mean the plus code can be computed by the OSM web site or the offline app. Or they do not have access to the OSM website or an app, in which case the plus code stored in OSM doesn't help either! Same situation if someone is given a plus code and wants to know where it is...

@jguthrie100

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@jguthrie100

jguthrie100 Aug 9, 2018

Contributor

What OSM needs really is a Right Click -> Get Lat/Lon and Right Click -> Get PlusCode

And @Vaomatua , I think what @woodpeck means is that the PlusCodes shouldn't need to be saved as Tags on the building itself. (which is really painstaking if you have to manually work out the PlusCode for every single object you add to OSM!)

In theory, you should be able to just right click on the building and the PlusCode is automatically generated using the lat/lon coords, which means the mappers don't need to do anything!

Contributor

jguthrie100 commented Aug 9, 2018

What OSM needs really is a Right Click -> Get Lat/Lon and Right Click -> Get PlusCode

And @Vaomatua , I think what @woodpeck means is that the PlusCodes shouldn't need to be saved as Tags on the building itself. (which is really painstaking if you have to manually work out the PlusCode for every single object you add to OSM!)

In theory, you should be able to just right click on the building and the PlusCode is automatically generated using the lat/lon coords, which means the mappers don't need to do anything!

@dieterdreist

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@dieterdreist

dieterdreist Aug 9, 2018

dieterdreist commented Aug 9, 2018

@jguthrie100

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@jguthrie100

jguthrie100 Aug 9, 2018

Contributor

If PlusCodes get implemented, then the PlusCode should be dropped in there too then!

Contributor

jguthrie100 commented Aug 9, 2018

If PlusCodes get implemented, then the PlusCode should be dropped in there too then!

@RobJN

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@RobJN

RobJN Aug 9, 2018

The proprietary systems are not brilliant inventions or engineering feats; the only thing that sets them apart is their marketing and sales budget. Which they have precisely because they promise big profits down the line.

Um, you've lost me on that one @woodpeck. What big profits? "Plus codes are free. There are no licensing fees or other costs. The technology is open-sourced." This isn't W3W!

As @drinckes says: It takes a lot of money to countries to go about naming all their roads. Plus codes is available for free now (and always) and it doesn't prevent a government from naming all their roads and creating a postal address system when time and money allows.

See Doug's full talk from SotM 2017 here:
https://2017.stateofthemap.org/2017/open-source-street-addresses/

RobJN commented Aug 9, 2018

The proprietary systems are not brilliant inventions or engineering feats; the only thing that sets them apart is their marketing and sales budget. Which they have precisely because they promise big profits down the line.

Um, you've lost me on that one @woodpeck. What big profits? "Plus codes are free. There are no licensing fees or other costs. The technology is open-sourced." This isn't W3W!

As @drinckes says: It takes a lot of money to countries to go about naming all their roads. Plus codes is available for free now (and always) and it doesn't prevent a government from naming all their roads and creating a postal address system when time and money allows.

See Doug's full talk from SotM 2017 here:
https://2017.stateofthemap.org/2017/open-source-street-addresses/

@simonpoole

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@simonpoole

simonpoole Aug 9, 2018

Contributor

The other issue is that they use Latin script letters which is a non-starter for anything intended for global use.

Contributor

simonpoole commented Aug 9, 2018

The other issue is that they use Latin script letters which is a non-starter for anything intended for global use.

@RobJN

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@RobJN

RobJN Aug 9, 2018

Yeah, don't put them in the database as key=value tags. Implement the ability to search them in Nomination (as per the PR). It sounds like OSMAnd, MapsMe and GoogleMaps have already done this. Why not Nominatim too?

The other issue is that they use Latin script letters which is a non-starter for anything intended for global use.

Um, but so does every url (or has that changed now). Sounds like an excuse in my opinion.

RobJN commented Aug 9, 2018

Yeah, don't put them in the database as key=value tags. Implement the ability to search them in Nomination (as per the PR). It sounds like OSMAnd, MapsMe and GoogleMaps have already done this. Why not Nominatim too?

The other issue is that they use Latin script letters which is a non-starter for anything intended for global use.

Um, but so does every url (or has that changed now). Sounds like an excuse in my opinion.

@RobJN

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@RobJN

RobJN Aug 9, 2018

Also a good tweet on addresses (or the lack of them) from SotM:

Geoffrey [@kateregga1] from @mapuganda sharing about mapping in Northern Uganda. Refugees describe their address based on the nearest water tank “I live in tank 11”. #sotm
https://twitter.com/mapkibera/status/1023913370972372992

I don't know if @kateregga1 saw the Plus Codes lightning talk (or the 2017 talk), but it would be nice to get his view as plus codes seem like they could help improve that situation.

RobJN commented Aug 9, 2018

Also a good tweet on addresses (or the lack of them) from SotM:

Geoffrey [@kateregga1] from @mapuganda sharing about mapping in Northern Uganda. Refugees describe their address based on the nearest water tank “I live in tank 11”. #sotm
https://twitter.com/mapkibera/status/1023913370972372992

I don't know if @kateregga1 saw the Plus Codes lightning talk (or the 2017 talk), but it would be nice to get his view as plus codes seem like they could help improve that situation.

@simonpoole

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@simonpoole

simonpoole Aug 9, 2018

Contributor

@RobJN why would you "Implement the ability to search them in Nomination" that makes 0 sense, if you have a plus code you simply convert it to the grid square/centroid coordinates no searching necessary or even possible.

Another way of looking at it is simply a reduced precision coded format for coordinates.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internationalized_domain_name for i18n domain names, a different problem, but not an excuse to repeat the same mistakes.

Contributor

simonpoole commented Aug 9, 2018

@RobJN why would you "Implement the ability to search them in Nomination" that makes 0 sense, if you have a plus code you simply convert it to the grid square/centroid coordinates no searching necessary or even possible.

Another way of looking at it is simply a reduced precision coded format for coordinates.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internationalized_domain_name for i18n domain names, a different problem, but not an excuse to repeat the same mistakes.

@RobJN

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@RobJN

RobJN Aug 9, 2018

Why not Nominatim too?

Sorry I got this wrong. It looks like the PR is to add them direct to the OSM.org search as a new provider alongside nominatim. My bad for not understanding the technical side properly.

RobJN commented Aug 9, 2018

Why not Nominatim too?

Sorry I got this wrong. It looks like the PR is to add them direct to the OSM.org search as a new provider alongside nominatim. My bad for not understanding the technical side properly.

@sabas

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@sabas

sabas Aug 10, 2018

Sarah has said this shouldn't be implemented by Nominatim, see openstreetmap/Nominatim#914

sabas commented Aug 10, 2018

Sarah has said this shouldn't be implemented by Nominatim, see openstreetmap/Nominatim#914

@drinckes

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@drinckes

drinckes Aug 10, 2018

Hi - I'm the lead of the plus codes project. I was at SotM this year in Milan but had to unexpectedly leave early, I was hoping to have some of this discussion in person but unfortunately it didn't work out.

@woodpeck makes a good point - the plus code is just a formatting of the lat/lng so it doesn't need to be stored with the object*. What could be worth storing or associating with the object is the locality, because computing the "best" locality associated with a point can be expensive. (It isn't necessarily the closest, because you want to respect country and state borders, and you might have a tiny village close and a large city slightly further, but the city may make more sense.)

Of course, that assumes the plus code address is the center of the object. But you might want it to indicate the doorway, or the drive way (if it's a long way off the road). In that case you will want the code separate but I agree that will be a nice to have.

@simonpoole makes the good point that plus codes are based on latin characters. We were worried about this, so did some surveys with people in different script countries, and most of them made the point that @RobJN made - basically "umm, how do you think we type www.google.com?" We launched the codes in Maps on Android a year ago, and we see high usage in non-latin script countries (arabic, cyrillic, japanese etc). At the moment, our thoughts are that there is more to be gained by having a single, consistent script for the code part, but at least we can reconsider this in the future.

I would love to see search support in OSM web, and especially in geocoders (so that not everyone has to implement it in their front end). The challenge for geocoders is that they don't turn an address into a location, so much as into the best matching object in their database. A plus code like "27W4+MR Kintampo" is an exact location (8.046747, -1.742878), but geocoders return a nearby road or even just a locality.

I'd be excited to see geocoders consider this problem, not just for support of plus codes, but also to support the kinds of address that are really common in poorly addressed areas - like "50m past the bus stop", "kilometer 10, MG road" etc.

It's going to be a long time before any of us map every building in the world. It would be great if someone in Paraguay, Mali, Canada, or anywhere, can get their plus code address, tell it to someone else and that person can get to the location, using any map app, and without having to wait for someone to add their building to maps.

drinckes commented Aug 10, 2018

Hi - I'm the lead of the plus codes project. I was at SotM this year in Milan but had to unexpectedly leave early, I was hoping to have some of this discussion in person but unfortunately it didn't work out.

@woodpeck makes a good point - the plus code is just a formatting of the lat/lng so it doesn't need to be stored with the object*. What could be worth storing or associating with the object is the locality, because computing the "best" locality associated with a point can be expensive. (It isn't necessarily the closest, because you want to respect country and state borders, and you might have a tiny village close and a large city slightly further, but the city may make more sense.)

Of course, that assumes the plus code address is the center of the object. But you might want it to indicate the doorway, or the drive way (if it's a long way off the road). In that case you will want the code separate but I agree that will be a nice to have.

@simonpoole makes the good point that plus codes are based on latin characters. We were worried about this, so did some surveys with people in different script countries, and most of them made the point that @RobJN made - basically "umm, how do you think we type www.google.com?" We launched the codes in Maps on Android a year ago, and we see high usage in non-latin script countries (arabic, cyrillic, japanese etc). At the moment, our thoughts are that there is more to be gained by having a single, consistent script for the code part, but at least we can reconsider this in the future.

I would love to see search support in OSM web, and especially in geocoders (so that not everyone has to implement it in their front end). The challenge for geocoders is that they don't turn an address into a location, so much as into the best matching object in their database. A plus code like "27W4+MR Kintampo" is an exact location (8.046747, -1.742878), but geocoders return a nearby road or even just a locality.

I'd be excited to see geocoders consider this problem, not just for support of plus codes, but also to support the kinds of address that are really common in poorly addressed areas - like "50m past the bus stop", "kilometer 10, MG road" etc.

It's going to be a long time before any of us map every building in the world. It would be great if someone in Paraguay, Mali, Canada, or anywhere, can get their plus code address, tell it to someone else and that person can get to the location, using any map app, and without having to wait for someone to add their building to maps.

@bhousel bhousel referenced this pull request Aug 10, 2018

Open

Improve search #5214

@johnwhelan

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@johnwhelan

johnwhelan Aug 10, 2018

Since OSMand already supports them I think that deals with the religious arguments and adding them to the search would reduce the number of people adding them to the addr: fields in OSM. There is a thread in osm-talk where Frederick has written a fairly long email outlining why adding them separately is a bad idea and I get the impression from his post adding them to the search would be the sensible approach.

So can we just enable this since it is coded already?

Thanks John

johnwhelan commented Aug 10, 2018

Since OSMand already supports them I think that deals with the religious arguments and adding them to the search would reduce the number of people adding them to the addr: fields in OSM. There is a thread in osm-talk where Frederick has written a fairly long email outlining why adding them separately is a bad idea and I get the impression from his post adding them to the search would be the sensible approach.

So can we just enable this since it is coded already?

Thanks John

@RobJN

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@RobJN

RobJN Aug 13, 2018

Over on the ML (and I stress, I have not read it all), @systemed suggests there is sufficient consensus around @tomhughes' implementation. See: https://lists.openstreetmap.org/pipermail/talk/2018-August/081220.html

@woodpeck mentioned the featured tile layer policy. If we assume that as a starting point (i.e. copy-paste) then we tick off all 6 of the "Must" criteria and most of the "Should" list (albeit that the Unique and Interesting aspects could be debated seemingly forever!). The last "Should" item isn't really relevant in this use case.

Based on that, can I be so bold to suggest that this is now ready for inclusion?

RobJN commented Aug 13, 2018

Over on the ML (and I stress, I have not read it all), @systemed suggests there is sufficient consensus around @tomhughes' implementation. See: https://lists.openstreetmap.org/pipermail/talk/2018-August/081220.html

@woodpeck mentioned the featured tile layer policy. If we assume that as a starting point (i.e. copy-paste) then we tick off all 6 of the "Must" criteria and most of the "Should" list (albeit that the Unique and Interesting aspects could be debated seemingly forever!). The last "Should" item isn't really relevant in this use case.

Based on that, can I be so bold to suggest that this is now ready for inclusion?

@sommerluk

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@sommerluk

sommerluk Aug 14, 2018

I’m also in favour of supporting it now.

sommerluk commented Aug 14, 2018

I’m also in favour of supporting it now.

@der-stefan

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@der-stefan

der-stefan Aug 20, 2018

By the way: radio amateurs heavily use a locator system for decades, see Maidenhead Locator System on Wikipedia (also called QTH locator).
OpenTopoMap handles QTH locators for years: https://opentopomap.org/#qth=JN59MO

<troll>Why not map QTH locators additionally to every building in OSM?</troll>

der-stefan commented Aug 20, 2018

By the way: radio amateurs heavily use a locator system for decades, see Maidenhead Locator System on Wikipedia (also called QTH locator).
OpenTopoMap handles QTH locators for years: https://opentopomap.org/#qth=JN59MO

<troll>Why not map QTH locators additionally to every building in OSM?</troll>

Sign up for free to join this conversation on GitHub. Already have an account? Sign in to comment